Translational inhibition due to CHEAP RETIN-A the fact that the path of the excitation occurs Br neuron. recurrent inhibition     Carried intercalary brake cells (Renshaw). Axons of buy nolvadex online canada motor neurons often give collaterals (branches), ending with Renshaw cells. Renshaw cell axons terminate on the body or dendrites of the motor neuron, forming inhibitory synapses. Arousal that occurs in motor neurons travel in a straight path to the skeletal muscle, as well as collaterals to inhibitory neurons, which send impulses to motoneurons and inhibits them. The stronger the motor neuron excitation, the more excited Renshaw cells and the more intense they exert their inhibitory effect, which protects nerve cells from overstimulation. lateral inhibition    
 

-Masterweb Reports
 
This is not about Charles Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities but about two states that grew from the same source. Delta and Edo States were formerly Bendel State. Before then it was Midwest State. Midwest State was so named on May 27, 1967 when Gowon created twelve states. It was the only region that was not split in that 1967 state creation exercise. In 1963, Midwest Region was created. It remains to date the only constitutionally created state in Nigeria. It was not created via any military fiat.

 
As Midwest State, the state became the pacesetter in Nigeria. The state became synonymous with development. In infrastructure, sports and other areas, the state became number one in the country. When it metamorphosed to Bendel State, the pace never slowed.

 
When twenty one years ago, Bendel State gave birth to Delta and Edo States one had expected the two states to maintain the pace. The relationship between these two states goes even beyond the 1963 creation of Midwest Region. Nearly all ethnic groups in the two states trace their origin to Bini. The language spoken by nearly all the ethnic groups in both states can be traceable too to Bini language. In folk tales too, most of the stories are about the Obas of Benin Empire.

 
Politically too, both states have been moving in the same direction. In the second republic, Bendel state joined the progressives in the West by voting in a Unity Party of Nigeria (UPN) governorship candidate. In 1983, Bendel State went to National Party of Nigeria (NPN).

 
During Babangida’s contraption and democratic experiment, both states went to the Social Democratic Party (SDP). Both states have been moving in the same ideological direction way back in time.

 
In 1999, both states went to the People’s Democratic Party (PDP). In both states for a long period of time, they were condemned to bad leadership and corruption. For ten years, Edo state was in bondage. Development was lacking. There was infrastructural decay. Insecurity became the order of the day. The godfathers were busy helping themselves to state fund. It was ten years of disaster in Edo state. No wonder, the former governor was found guilty of corruption.

 
The case was not different in Delta State. Since 1999, the state has been retrogressing. Roads are in terrible conditions. From Effurun Roundabout to Enerhen Junction, from Enerhen Road to Udu, Refinery Road, there is none to write home about. Asaba is not faring better either. Apart from the new bridge construction going on, Agbor is a forgotten place. Where roads are constructed, it is of very poor quality. Maryam Babangida Way in Asaba is a typical example.

 
The Health is not left out in this rot going on in Delta State. Asaba General Hospital is an eyesore. If the hospital in the state capital is this bad, one can imagine what obtains in the rural areas.

 
Corruption has eaten deep into the system. Delta State awards the most expensive projects in the country and in most cases, the projects are never completed. Oghara power project has not left the drawing board several years after it was awarded and paid for. Asaba Airport has become a drain on the state’s purse. The Airport has gulped several billions of naira and is yet to be completed. N7.4billion was the contract sum for the demolition of hills at the airport. It was meant to be done in ten days. Over two months later, the job has not been completed.

 
Elections in Delta State have been the worst in the country. Results are known even before elections. Thanks to the judiciary, such results are made to stand. Since 1999, those in power have been able to win elections but have not been able to win the hearts of the people.

 
Like Edo State, the former governor of Delta State has been convicted of money laundering charges. It was ten years of bad governance and corruption in Edo State while Delta State has been thirteen years of corruption and bad governance with no end in sight.

 
In 2007, the people of Edo State had had enough. They decided to vote against underdevelopment, corruption and bad governance. Though the mandate was stolen, they were resolute and unbowed. Comrade Oshiomole provided the needed leadership - a quality that has been lacking in Delta State opposition. Almost two years after, Edo people reclaimed their mandate. Since then, Edo State has been on the roller coaster of one success story to the other. The people have never had it so good. While Edo State is on the ascendancy of development, Delta State has been on the ascendancy of corruption.

 
Two weeks ago, Edo people reaffirmed their faith in Comrade Oshiomole by massively voting for him and politically burying the forces of darkness in the state. They defended their votes. They ensured that their votes counted. In spite of some logistic problems in some areas and inclement weather in other areas, the people were never discouraged. They did not want the forces of darkness to eclipse the sun already shinning in the state. Their leader, the Comrade Governor never disappointed them as a leader. He was there with them. The small man with a big heart was like a god to Edo people. He never for once abandoned them. Today, any Deltan that passes through Edo State will be ashamed of his state. With a very small budget Comrade Oshiomole has been able to do what Delta State could not do with its massive budget.

 
Edo and Delta State are twins. Both states have been moving in one ideological direction until recently. Today, Edo State has overtaken Delta State. While Edo State is a reference point of good governance, Delta State has become a reference point of bad governance and corruption. Delta State must move in the right direction.

 
In a Press Statement issued by Delta Rescue Mission (DRM), immediately after the announcement of the Edo Election results, the group has this to say:

 
“The Edo State election is a source of good lesson for the people of Delta State. Since the advent of this democratic dispensation, Delta State has never had it so bad. Some politicians impose themselves through the blessing of the judiciary on the people. Delta State has suffered enough. Seeing the developmental strides in Edo State, one is ashamed to note that Delta State has more resources with little to show for it.

 
No non performing individual or political party can impose itself on the voters if they are determined and focused. This is the lesson from Edo State. It is the will of the people that determines change in democracy. Unlike the bullet in a military era, it is the ballot that becomes the people's potency against the wicked who want to rule by all means. When people are tired of darkness, their appetite for light cannot be silenced anymore. Deltans, let us move towards the light.

 
We were once the Midwest and then Bendel. It is wise to move westwards into the club of focused, visionary and development driven governors. We can do it. Delta Rescue Mission has flagged it off, join us. The time to prepare for that change is now.”

 
I cannot agree more with this statement. Deltans, let us begin to mobilize the people now. Power belongs to the people and not riggers of elections. We must take a cue from Edo State and make our votes count.

 
Eddy Aghanenu
Delta Rescue Mission

-Masterweb Reports
 
The Government of Anambra State has viewed with concern, the unwholesome acts of some miscreants in various parts of the State who engage in the negative conduct of obstructing, disturbing, impeding and generally preventing the needed development and improvement on land throughout the State.

 
Government also notes that the rascalities of these deviant groups, who operate under one name or the other, have had the undesirable effect of disrupting the activities of genuineinvestors and developers who wish to invest in the State.

 
We now have a law that takes care of this ugly situation. The law prohibits and makes criminal, certain conducts relating to land, some of which are:

 
- Any person selling land not belonging to him, to another person.

 
Any person selling the same parcel of land to two or more different persons.

 
- Any person demanding or collecting any fee not approved by law from any person developing or improving an already existing property in the State.

 
- Any person willfully damaging, destroying, pulling down or removing any beacon or structure on any land belonging to another person.

 
- Any person harassing, obstructing or assaulting any worker in a construction site with the intent to compel the worker or owner of the land to pay an illegal fee.
 

 
 
 
The penalties for these offences as provided by the law, range from four to ten years imprisonment or appropriate fine.
 
Enforcement Committees which will see to the strict implementation of this law are now being set up in all the Local Government Areas of the State.

 
Let me use this occasion to warn all those who have hitherto involved or engaged themselves in the activities which are now criminalized by the Prohibition of Fraudulent Practices on Land and Property Law, to henceforth desist from or put a stop to such unwholesome acts. Such persons, especially the youths, are advised to find other lawful and productive activities to engage in. It is the desire and determination of this Government to ensure and sustain a conducive and peaceful environment for all those engaged in lawful enterprise in this State.

 
Finally, the good people of the State will recall that at the early part of this Government, I had cause to proscribe some organizations in the effort to get rid of dangerous and undesirable elements so as to sanitize the State.

 
Presently, some more groups have emerged with similar negative activities which are inimical to the interest of the State. In this administration’s determination to rid the State of all such undesirable groups and persons who hinder the lawful enterprise of our people, I have today, pursuant to my powers under Section 98(2) of the Criminal Code, Laws of Anambra State, 1991, proscribed some organizations or groups whose activities are deemed dangerous to the good government of the State by declaring them as unlawful societies in Anambra State. Those affected are:

 
(a) Mpiawa-azu group (or by whatever name called);
 
(b) Igbo Youths Organization (or by whatever name called);
 
(c) Ogbaru Youths Organization (or by whatever name called); and
 
(d) All other Local Government Areas Youth Organizations in the State.

 
 
 
 
The legal implication of this Order is that it is now a criminal offence for any person to belong to, associate with, manage or assist in the management of any of the concerned groups or organizations. All Community based youth organizations must be registered with, supervised by, controlled and subjected tothe town union and traditional ruler of that community which must take responsibility for the activities or conducts of their youth organizations. This Government is determined and will continue to strive in its constitutional duty to maintain law and order in Anambra State.
 

 
 
 
Thank you all and may God bless you
 
 
 

–Masterweb Reports
 
Bakassi is situated at the extreme eastern end of the Gulf of Guinea. According to Wikipedia, “Bakassi is the peninsular extension of the African territory of Calabar into the Atlantic Ocean”. The people of Bakassi were originally from Calabar and Akwa Ibom.

 
The first fishing settlement in the peninsular was established by Abasi Eke of Obutong in the 17th century. The peninsular was generally known by the indigenes as Akai Abasi Eke which the British corrupted to Bakassi. The British acknowledged that the area were dependencies of Calabar.

 
The peninsular is very rich in resources. It has abundance of fish. It is also rich in oil. Wikipedia says further that the area is “rich in fish, shrimps, and an amazing variety of other marine life forms. This makes the Bakassi area a very fertile fishing ground, comparable only to Newfoundland in North America and Scandinavia in Western Europe. Most of the population make their living through fishing.” Is it any wonder that the place has been an area of dispute for a very long time?

 
In 1884, agents of the British Queen signed a treaty with the king and chiefs of Old Calabar, making the Old Calabar a British Protectorate. The King and Chiefs of Old Calabar refused to accept some clauses in the treaty which gave the British an unfettered access to Old Calabar territory. In spite of this objection, the British went ahead to sign this treaty on 10th September, 1984. Article v1 of the treaty said the King and Chiefs refused to allow uncontrolled access to their territory.

 
The British went further to sign a treaty with the Kings and Chiefs of Bakassi. The Bakassi kings and chiefs refused to enter a treaty with the British declaring that they were subject to the authority and jurisdiction of the kings and chiefs of Old Calabar.

 
Despite the objection of the Bakassi people, the British went ahead to cede the territory to Germany in a treaty purportedly signed on 11th March, 1913. The territory continued to be part of Nigeria. Even after the plebiscite of 1961 when Southern Camerouns decided to join Cameroun, Bakassi continued to be a part of Nigeria.

 
In 1971 and 1975, Nigeria under General Gowon in not very clear circumstances signed agreement with Cameroun ceding Bakassi to Cameroun. These were the Yaoundé II Declaration of 4 April 1971 and the Maroua Declaration of 1 June 1975, which were devised to outline maritime boundaries. These agreements were however never ratified by the Supreme Military Council (the parliamentary arm of Nigerian military government then). The agreement has therefore no force of law.

 
Nigeria and Cameroun almost went to war in 1981 and early 1990s. The Shagari government and Abacha regime respectively never allowed Cameroun to have her way. Cameroun was forced to retreat.

 
This was the situation before Cameroun went to the International Court of Justice on 29th March, 1994. The outcome of that case was the ICJ judgment of 10th October, 2002, confirming in a curious judgment that Bakassi belongs to Cameroun based on the treaty purportedly signed by Germany and Britain of 11th March, 1913. The judgment went against all that UN stood for. It breached the United States Charter on Human Rights which says in Article 15 that

 
-->[ Everyone has a right to a nationality. ]

 
- -->[ No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality or denied the right to change his nationality. ]

 
The people were never asked to choose where they want to be. Judgments are no longer based on treaties signed without the people’s consent. The judgment also ignored the principle of uti possidetis juris – as you possess, you shall possess henceforth. People who declared that they were under the jurisdiction of Calabar were suddenly asked to leave their kith and kin and be citizens of Cameroun.

 
In the Green Tree Agreement which Obasanjo signed on 13th June, 2006, for reasons best known to him, it was agreed between both countries that rights and freedom of Nigerians left behind will be guaranteed. Today, the reverse is the case. Nigerians are oppressed and discriminated against. Those who left are in refugee camps in their own country in peace time. They are now located at Akpabuyo Local Government, a crop farming environment different from the fish farming environment which they were used to in Bakassi. They were disfranchised during the last general elections.

 
The Bakassi peninsula being a very rich area has been attracting the interest of the international community. France has been the power behind Cameroun’s agitation all along. We can be sure too that France may well be involved in the ICJ judgment.

 
Why Nigeria hurriedly signed the Green Tree agreement can still not be fathomed. She was not obligated to sign that agreement. Examples are bound all over the world of countries that ignore international community without being sanctioned. Israel has been sitting on Arab lands for decades without any sanction. Britain is claiming Falkland Island in the Pacific when it is obvious that that is part of Argentine territory. The US and Russia are still holding firm some Japanese Islands in spite of Japanese opposition.

 
The Nigerian Senate on 22nd November, 2007, that the withdrawal from the peninsular was illegal. A Federal High Court in a judgment also said that the Federal Government should suspend the withdrawal until all resettlement issues have been settled. The Federal Government ignored these and went ahead to handover the territory to Cameroun.

 
Nigeria has ten years to appeal the judgment. The ten years elapses by 10th October, 2012. If by this date, Nigeria never appeals, then Bakassi is gone forever. The implications are serious. The security implications are there. It means that Nigeria’s territorial waters would be reduced. This will be worsened with the National Boundary Commission’s adjustment of the maritime boundary. It will lead to other struggles by the neighbouring countries of Cameroun, Equatorial Guinea and Sao Tome and Principe.

 
Nigeria will become vulnerable to attacks. The economic resources in the area will become free to be plundered especially France and Cameroun. The people of Bakassi will be homeless as where they are even being harboured now is raising tension. Those left in the peninsular are being over taxed, raped, their fishing gears seized from them and social amenities not provided.

 
Nigeria has a very good ground to appeal the ICJ judgment. The people were never consulted before being relocated to another country. Their fundamental human rights have been breached. The cultural affinity between the Bakassi people and Clabar is never in doubt. The treaty which was the basis of the judgment was signed without the people’s consent. The people of Bakassi must not be abandoned. The Nigerian Government has almost abandoned the Bakassi people. They cannot vote. They are still in refugee camps. The Bakassi people were never settled. Today, they have no means of livelihood. Only about a hundred houses were built for a population that Wikipedia estimates to be between 150,000 and 300,000 people.

 
Nigeria must be able to protect her people and territory. Let her start doing that now by appealing the ICJ judgment. No inch of this country must be lost.

 
Eddy Aghanenu

-Masterweb Reports
 
Have you heard the story of sour grapes? It’s basically about a person who desires something badly but failing to get it turns round to condemn it. Although it is just a story some of us are known to have taken this trait to another level such that it keeps recurring and becomes part of their personality.

 
We have many of such characters in Anambra but one of them particularly stands out. He is Chudi Offodile a one-time federal house member. Offodile has elevated this trait to levels unimagined to the extent that it has become a sort of syndrome to him which was aptly portrayed by Joseph Anarado on the back page of This Day newspaper of July 2.

 
Offodile had a largely ineffective representation of his people of Awka North and South federal constituency on PDP platform from 1999 to 2003. PDP even as bad as its members were and are still perceived in Anambra deemed Offodile bad enough not to represent them for a second term. Offodile promptly cross-carpeted to the All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA) to contest for senate. APGA not knowing the kind of person Offodile is and probably buying his yarn that he was muscled out of PDP because of the shenanigans there admitted him and allowed him to use their platform to contest the 2007 senate.

 
Again Offodile lost. His people simply used the opportunity to demonstrate their unhappiness with him for doing nothing for them in his earlier four-year stay in the lower house. Offodile realized too late that party platform could not save him.

 
Offodile indeed has a history of rejection by his people. In 1992 he contested for House of Reps on NRC platform but was floored by a woman from SDP, Ifeoma Chinwuba. He tried again in 1999 when after losing out in the primaries he simulated a riotous situation that enabled him to be declared winner by frightened officials who conducted the primaries. On the day of the election he was arrested by the police and the commissioner of police confirmed that arrest on the local NTA station on allegations of election malpractice. He was later released after his party threw its muscles behind him.

 
He went on to ride on the then formidable PDP rigging machinery to a contrived victory and spent the next four years in the federal house. In 2003 even though he was not the rightful candidate of PDP he still wangled his way to Abuja but eventually got punished for his sins when a tribunal threw him out after two years in the national assembly. Indeed, Offodile’s major achievement as a representative of his people was the building of the most expensive hotel in Awka to feather his own nest. Even his constituents still cannot afford to lodge there. Indeed Offodile belonged to the old destructive order that Obi has sent packing. But I was happy to read Offodile concede that when he said inter alia: ‘Peter Obi brought civility and peace to governance in Anambra State at a time politics in the state had degenerated to dangerous and unacceptable levels.’

 
The above truthful admission must have been as a result of what we commonly call a slip of tongue by Offodile but it just goes to show that Offodile was part of the uncivility and danger that pervaded the state’s politics then and naturally he like others are fighting back against the change agent called Gov Obi.



 
It is noteworthy that while he was joining APGA Offodile praised Obi and his government to high heavens, falling short of branding the governor a Messiah. Yet this is the same governor Offodile later turned round to disparage his achievements after falling out of favour with the party.

 
Like all people jaundiced by hate Offodile in his reaction to Nasir El-Rufai’s tantrums on Anambra State, joined El-Rufai in churning out obvious lies against Gov Obi and Anambra people. The common denominator in both men’s motives was fear of Obi’s soaring profile locally and internationally as a result of his stupendous achievements in a state badly paralysed by maladministration in the recent past.

 
Also both men’s vituperative comments on Obi are clearly driven by fear of what Obi’s rising profile will mean to their ambitions. While El-Rufai sees Obi rightly or wrongly as a big threat to his vice presidential ambition, Offodile sees Obi as a stumbling block to his impending guber ambition. Offodile feels that Obi’s insistence that the next governor should come from the Anambra North senatorial zone could sound the death knell on his candidature as Obi might ‘anoint’ a candidate of his own. So Offodile wants to downplay Obi’s achievements in order to rubbish his own candidate if at all Obi has any such plans.

 
Thus they had gone on to spill obvious lies. But while El-Rufai can be excused for his since he doesn’t hail from Anambra State, Offodile’s is very pathetic as he is supposed to be a son of the soil. That is why some people have termed El-Rufai an ignoramus and Offodile a mischievous person.

 
If not why should El-Rufai term Anambra people as poor and Offodile support him? Why should El-Rufai say Anambra profited from Ngige more than from Obi and Offodile concur? Indeed enumerating what falsehood they churned out is not worth the ink flowing from one’s pen but it will perhaps suffice to give a few examples which will blow their submissions to smithereens; just a few examples.

 
Let’s just take roads. While Chris Ngige was governor he did roads quite alright but it was the manner they were done that made the difference. Ngige concentrated only on his domain which is Idemili North and South axis, completely neglecting Awka the state capital and the rest of the state. Now, one can ask; of what economic importance were Idemili roads over Awka’s and the commercial cities of Onitsha and Nnewi? What about the food producing areas of Anambra East and West?

 
But when Obi came aboard he spread his dragnet to cover every part of the state, giving every zone a sense of belonging. For the first time the state capital started being developed and today it is not in doubt that any new thing in the state capital was facilitated by Obi. They include the first ever teaching hospital, the workers’ secretariat, the refurbished Ekwueme Square, the first library in the state after the one built in the First Republic in Onitsha, the Zik Avenue, Arthur Eze Road, the GRA extension roads behind government house, the Awka inner ring road, Court Road, Works Road, Majua Road, the state emergency office complex, among others.

 
In Ngige’s time Ngige never thought of these things but preferred to be clannish as he developed only his area. But even at that Ngige had a one-point agenda of just parochial road construction. He did nothing in critical sectors like health, education, commerce and industry, sports, etcetera.

 
But Obi has turned the education sector around by providing schools with computers, buses, generators, boreholes, etc.

 
Obi has okayed the promotion of workers who were told by Ngige when they went to him that it was not their right; Obi has increased their salaries four times; Obi is building the first teaching hospital in the state; he has built the first stock exchange in the state; built the first stadium (Chuba Ikpeazu) in Onitsha and building another one there; he has handed over schools to the missions and given them a ten-year grant to run the schools; he has handed over some mission hospitals back to them and given them money to operate; he gives the 177 communities in the state money every December to tackle security and pressing projects; he has used his security vote to assist the police and other security agencies in the state by providing with over 100 vehicles and equipment; he has constructed over 600 kilometres of roads in the state and built the highest number of bridges in the state than any previous government, transforming Anambra as with the best road network; he has revived the dead transport sector through the ANIDS Mass Transit buses and cars. The list is endless. All these are very verifiable and have been a result of careful and prudent management of the state’s lean resources through the Anambra Integrated Development Strategy that seeks to develop every sector at same time. It is also anchored on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the only state that uses it that way.

 
Obi is now giving 60 secondary schools N20m each to rebuild dilapidated infrastructure, something never dreamt of in the state.

 
The wonder is that Obi has done all this without borrowing a dime from any quarter.

 
Yet El-Rufai and Offodile want us to believe otherwise. This is why their position has been laughed at by everybody. From what has been enumerated here the truth is obvious and the world can see who’s been lying. But as stated earlier some people attack and condemn what is beyong their reach and that is now what is beginning to be seen as the Offodile Syndrome.

 
Obiora Odenigbo

-Masterweb Reports

MEMORANDUM FROM OHANAEZE NDIGBO - On Behalf of The Igbo-Speaking People of Nigeria. BACKGROUND - For our country, with its colonial stamp of 'made in England', the three hundred odd ethnic and sub-ethnic units in this land, brought together by the force of British Imperialism to forge a modern nation, have good cause to thank God for the astonishing abundance of human and material resources bestowed on us. We are still in the process of nation building, struggling to blend together and harmonize our various very rich but differing traditions, customs and cultures. The recognition of the significance of ......Click For Complete Ohanaeze Draft Submission

-Masterweb Reports
 

The Amnesty Programme, introduced by the late President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua, in more ways than one thawed the ice of tension in the oil-rich region of Nigeria. However, it remains a prelude to a comprehensive resolution of the Niger Delta problem, which is lack of development. So, the bottom-line is getting all stakeholders to join in the efforts to rapidly and significantly transform the oil-bearing communities.

 
The way forward, therefore, is to sustain the gains of the amnesty programme by embarking on tangible development projects that would positively change the lives of the people. That would also enlist them as vanguards for the protection of oil installations and vulnerable pipelines crisscrossing the Niger Delta. Even now, the oil industry is being threatened by the activities of criminals who seem to have taken over from where the militants left off.

 
According to Engineer Austen Oniwon, the Group Managing Director of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), thieves are stealing about 180,000 barrels worth of crude oil every day from pipelines and through illegal bunkering in the Niger Delta. So, as it is, high-profile criminals have taken over illegal oil trading activities from militants who hitherto engaged in such acts.

 
Counting the cost in monetary terms, Mr. Mutiu Sunmonu, the Managing Director, Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Limited, said that the country is losing $5bn (N780bn) annually to the oil thieves.

 
Thanks to the amnesty programme, the oil thieves can now be distinguished from the militants, who were genuinely agitating for a fair deal from the Federal Government. This is why no effort should be spared in ensuring that the fruits of the official pardon are fully enjoyed by the people who bear the brunt of oil exploration and exploitation.

 
In order to make things happen as quickly as expected, the development agencies, such as the oil companies, the federal, state, local governments, the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs and the Niger Delta Development Commission, NDDC, must collaborate at different levels and key into the regional development Master Plan already approved by the central government. The NDDC which facilitated the production of the Niger Delta Regional Development Master Plan is well placed to drive the process of its implementation. So far, the commission has been making efforts to build enduring partnerships and embarking on targeted engagements with strategic stakeholders.

 
Recently, the Presidential Monitoring Committee on NDDC held an interactive session with stakeholders in the region where it was agreed that the commission would focus more on completing all on-going projects awarded since its inception. The commission has commenced an audit of ongoing projects across the region to enable it identify the status of such projects in order to prioritize their completion based on available resources. Dr Christian Oboh, the Managing Director of the NDDC, said the commission had reviewed its budgetary system to put all existing projects on the top priority list. “A lot of projects have been awarded since the establishment of the NDDC; we intend to focus on the completion of the projects. Partnership is the new road map that the commission has adopted in project implementation across the states of the Niger Delta”, he said.

 
Dr. Oboh said that with the re-activation of the Advisory Committee of the NDDC, which comprises the governors of oil-bearing states and the principal officers of the commission, it would now be easier for them to interface directly on project planning and implementation. This is the driving force behind the joint effort of the NDDC, Akwa Ibom State Government and Mobil Producing Nigeria Ltd in the quest to complete the Eket-Ibeno Road. The 18 kilometre dual carriage way, with two bridges, is being constructed at the cost of N8.2 billion.

 
Obviously, pleased by the team effort, the Akwa Ibom State Governor, Godswill Akpabio eagerly joined the chief executive officers of NDDC and Mobil to inspect the road project to work out the best way to deliver it on schedule. The governor said that the road was strategic to the operations of Mobil and as such was very important to the state.

 
He was confident that the NDDC, having teamed up with the state government and Mobil, would deliver quality projects. “With the interaction we have had, there is hope for the Niger Delta. The MD of NDDC has shown focus, passion and commitment. For me, this is a turning point”, he said.

 
Such high profile partnership is the way forward for a region that is yearning for rapid development. The NDDC had always joined forces with key stakeholders in confronting the enormous challenge of making a difference in the lives of the people in the remote communities of the Niger Delta. One of such collaborations is in the construction of the 29 kilometre Ogbia-Nembe road, which it is undertaking in partnership with the Shell Petroleum Development Company [SPDC].

 
The N9.6 billion project illustrates the kind of challenges confronting the Niger Delta. It cuts through the swamps with ten bridges and 99 culverts. The terrain is such that four metres of clay soil has to be dug out and then sand-filled to provide a base for the road. It shouldn’t surprise anyone therefore to learn that constructing a road in this tough environment costs twice or thrice of what is required in other parts of the country. This is a project several previous administrations thought was impossible. Now work on the road is progressing appreciably.

 
This is just one of the many mega projects being executed by the interventionist agency with the limited funds at its disposal. Without doubt, the NDDC needs to be adequately funded to enable it deliver on its mandate. All the key stakeholders, which include the Niger Delta Ministry, three tiers of government and the oil companies, have a responsibility to collaborate with the NDDC as the agency driving the implementation of the Regional Development Master Plan.

 
The master plan, which has been generally applauded as a worthy compass for the development of the region, needs to be adequately funded and meticulously implemented in order to translate the lofty plans into tangible projects and programmes. The big ticket projects articulated in the plan require enormous resources to execute.

 
Unfortunately, the Federal Government which is supposed to lead the way in ensuring adequate funding for the commission for many years under the Olusegun Obasanjo administration failed to meet the statutory obligations to the commission. For many years, the interventionist agency was getting only 10 per cent from it instead of the statutory 15 per cent. This resulted in the much-talked about N500 billion debt that the Federal Government is owing the commission.

 
The NDDC Act states clearly how the commission shall be funded. Section 14[2] provides that “there shall be paid and credited to the fund established pursuant to subsection [1] of this section; [a] from the Federal Government the equivalent of 15 per cent of the total monthly allocation due to the member states of the commission from the federation account, this being the contribution of the Federal Government to the commission; [b] three per cent of the total annual budget of any oil-producing company operating onshore and offshore in the Niger Delta area, including gas processing companies; [c] 50 per cent of monies due to member states of the commission from the ecological fund...” and other sources such as grants and loans.

 
Apart from the Federal Government which did not comply with the provisions of the Act during the Obasanjo years, some of the oil companies have also not been paying the three per cent of their annual budget as required by law. Records show that they deduct first charges before calculating the three per cent from the balance. It is more like cutting the nose to spite the face, given that what they spend for the development of the Niger Delta is for their own good at the end of the day.

 
Given the enormous impact of their activities on the environment, the oil companies are expected to be at the forefront in the critical task of remediating, and indeed the comprehensive development of the oil basin that has suffered so much neglect in the past. It is, in fact, in their interest to develop the region where they operate in order to guarantee peace, which is very necessary for them to continue with their business.

 
Recently, the Petroleum Resources Minister, Mrs Diezani Alison-Madueke, blamed International Oil Companies (IOCs) for the underdevelopment of Nigeria's economy. She said that some decisions taken by the oil firms had resulted in a loss of over $300 billion to government coffers. The minister alleged various acts by foreign oil firms that showed intent to “generate their own revenue without paying attention to actions that add value to the over all Nigerian economy.”

 
The oil companies should embrace global best practices in the execution of their business in the Niger Delta. Ultimately, this will enhance their profile and expedite the development process of our country.

 
Ifeatu Agbu

-Masterweb Reports

 
Recent media have been inundated with the gory details of how a member of the Nigerian House of Representatives, Hon. Farouk Lawan of Shanano/Bagwai federal constituency of Kano state allegedly demanded for and received a bribe of $620,000 from Femi Otedola, CEO of Zenon Petroleum and Gas Ltd. Mr Otedola subsequently claimed that this was a sting operation orchestrated by the Nigerian Secret Service to trap the lawmaker in the act by the use of a video recording and marked bills. In a counter argument, Hon. Lawan insists that he on the other hand, played along in order to incriminate Mr Otedola. Actually, according to reports, the sum agreed on was $3 million, with $620,000 being paid as a part-payment, and for the balance to be paid after Zenon was taken off the list of indicted companies in the fuel subsidy report. The essence of this article is not to apportion blame or take sides, but rather to look more closely at the amount of money involved in this scandal.

 
It is by no means the biggest corruption scandal in the country’s history in monetary terms but it will surely rank up there as one of the most audacious. This is due to the fact that Hon. Lawan, who had been charged with the responsibility of investigating the corruption in the petroleum industry, had seemingly discharged his responsibilities without fear or favour, putting up a face of saint-like innocence and brick-like defiance. If it is proved that he is guilty, it would indeed be a sad day for us as a country. However, even if it is not, and it does turn out that the SSS provided the money for this “sting operation” (money which is now missing), how much can $620,000 buy if it were put to productive use? We hear of different amounts of money linked to corruption in Nigeria so often that we have become deadened or immune to the shock of a new scandal. So I decided to get out a notepad and do a little calculation of just how much $620,000 is worth.

 
To start with, based on the older World Bank definition of poverty being the inability to live on equal to or above $1 per day, $620,000 will be able to raise about 21,000 people out of poverty for a month and about 1,700 people out of poverty for a year. It would be sufficient to pay the school fees of about 6,700 children in a year at the primary and secondary levels as well as buy about 20,000 school books at N5,000 a piece. It can provide 23,000 pieces of clothing for children and would be able to pay for the sinking of about 832 boreholes.

 
What is $620,000 worth? It can purchase about 1,000,000 packs of anti-malaria drugs. It can provide anti-retroviral treatment for 4,103 people living with AIDS for one year. It can buy about 8,326 small generators for small and medium scale enterprises. It can also get 2,566 bicycles and 1,998 Innoson motorcycles for transportation of people in the rural areas or for them to start businesses. In addition, it could provide about 1.03 million litres of petrol!

 
Having said the foregoing, it should be noted that $620,000 is only 20% of $3 million. I leave it to your imagination to figure out what this same calculation would have come to, if $3 million was used instead in this analysis. To put things into context, some other recent scandals we have had in the national assembly include $203 million (N32.8 billion) that was allegedly embezzled in the pension scam, $230 million (N37 billion) illegal loan allegedly taken by Bankole and Nafada, and $273,000 (N44 million) bribe allegedly requested by Hon. Hembe. So in conclusion, having seen all this, my question is simple: what are they doing with all this money? 

 
By Chisom Ubabukoh
MSc Development Economics and Policy
University of Manchester
Chislo89@yahoo.co.uk

 
 
 

 -Masterweb Reports
 
Friday, June 15, 2012: In this photo, AFP captures a naked African female migrant described as a prostitute in a series of raids by Israel’s immigration police aimed at rounding up and deporting illegal African immigrants. The scene was recorded on Tuesday near Levinsky Park, in the Mediterranean city of Tel Aviv, where thousands of migrants reside. The question urgently begging for an answer is why was the woman not allowed to put on clothes before her arrest.
 

Israeli authorities on Monday [June 11] rounded up dozens of African migrants slated for deportation, most of them from South Sudan, as the government weighs tough penalties against Israelis who help illegal aliens.
 
The Population and Migration Authority said in a statement that officers arrested 45 migrants from South Sudan, along with three Nigerians, two Ghanaians, two Chinese, one from Ivory Coast, one from the Philippines and one whose nationality is being checked.
 
Israeli public radio said that in at least two cases, during early-morning swoops in the Red Sea town of Eilat, women with young children were picked up as they walked on the streets and were driven away.
 
Journalist and rights activist Toni Lissi told army radio that suspects in the town were picked up on the street, in banks, at their places of work and in door-to-door searches.
 
"The people arrested were taken on buses to detention centres. Their mobile phones were confiscated," she said.
 
"Other immigrants are hiding in their homes, not daring to go out until things calm down,' she said.
 
An Israeli court on Thursday ruled that the lives of an estimated 1500 migrants from South Sudan are no longer at risk in their homeland, clearing the way for their mass expulsion.
 
Israeli daily Haaretz said that a government committee on legislation had approved submission of draft bills which would raise the maximum penalty for Israelis who employed, housed or transported around the country illegal immigrants to five years in prison from two at present.
 
The bill is expected to go to parliament for a preliminary reading this week.
 
The interior ministry says that approximately 60,000 African immigrants have entered Israel illegally, including those from South Sudan, with which Israel has friendly relations.
 
AFP

-Masterweb Reports
 
It is really difficult to understand the motives of Mallam Nasir el-Rufai, the newly assumed do-gooder of the Nigerian polity, for his back page column in the ThisDay of last Friday, June 8th, which he entitled Anambra’s Budget of Misplaced Priorities. According to him, he had previously embarked on the analyses of the 2012 budgets of the other South East states. While it might not be apposite to query what might have warranted this sudden interest of Mallam el-Rufai in the affairs of Igbo people, many of whom he had maliciously and deliberately done in, when he destroyed and appropriated their property and means of existence in the FCT which he re-allocated to himself, his family members and friends, as it is his right and preserve to write on anything that catches his fancy.
 
 
However, querying eyebrows must be raised when he, in the process of discussing the socio and political economy of the area and one of its components, he takes a jolly ride on a road of abuse, distortion of facts and deliberate lies. By tarring Anambra State, its people and governance in such malicious and putrid brushes as he did in his said article, it would be foolish of him to believe that he would go unchallenged.
 
 
On the surface, el-Rufai, gave the impression that he was engaged in an intellectual and analytical treatise, by as usual, employing statistics and data which are not worth the pieces of paper on which they were issued. This is by the very fact that Economics is “a science of the commonsense”, and in daily socio-economic issues that govern human existence, you can tell a blind man that there is no oil in the food, but you definitely cannot tell him that there is no salt there.
 
 
In order to arrive at his real mission of insulting the people and leaders of Anambra State, El-Rufai, back-grounded his treatise with certain tendentious, but highly naive fallacies that he tried to pass off as facts, having laced them with statistics whose veracity fly in the face of commonsense, and which expose at the same time the woeful capacity of the institutions from which such statistics and date emanate. For instance, El-Rufai claimed that the poverty and unemployment levels in Anambra State are crying to the high heavens for deliverance.
 
 
In his words, “unemployment rate in Anambra is among the highest in the South-east zone, at 21.3 per cent, it is higher than the national average of 21.1 per cent”. Because unemployment is always associated with poverty, he then further posits that, “the incidence of poverty in the state is very high – actually disappointing”. He argued further with his weird statistics that, “the South-east has a food poor incidence of 41.0 per cent of which 60.9 per cent is absolutely poor, while 66.5 per cent is relatively poor and 56.8 per cent live under a dollar a day. Anambra has a poverty index of 22.8 per cent, the third highest in the zone, and shares the sixth lowest position in Nigeria with Rivers State which also has 22.8 per cent. About 47.6 per cent of the state’s population is core poor, 45.0 per cent is moderately poor and only 7.4 per cent of the state’s population is classified as none poor.”
 
 
As to Mallam El-Rufai, the spectre of the poverty of Anambra State must be driven home, for whatever reasons, so he lamented what he saw as the paucity of natural resources in the state, and that where they exist in any quantity, they are not exploited, like the oil deposits which he claimed are found in where he described as Ebenebe Ridge. According to him, “Anambra State is not much endowed with mineral resources and the few known to exist are not exploited”. Added to what he saw as the high criminality and dire security situation in the state, El-Rufai, in his copious crocodile tears, urged Anambra and its neighboring Igbo states to “ address the security challenges arising from violent crimes and kidnapping that has scared the elite and investors from the state.”
 
 
El-Rufai’s motives got a bit clearer when he inferred that this ‘sore’ state of affairs in Anambra State are in place or exacerbated by what he saw as the inability of the administration of the Mr. Peter Obi to rise to or overtake those calamitous situations in his state. That motive could not be hidden right from the title of his piece which indicated that the budget made and being executed by the government of the day which places extreme premium on all-round development of the state and its citizens, as misplaced.
 
 
But then, it is not easy to understand Mallam Nasir el-Rufai without understanding the duplicity of his personality and his character as a man whose ego is inversely proportional to his diminutive stature. It beggars understanding as to why el-Rufai suddenly wants Nigerians to start seeing him as the conscience of the public after his dubious performance as the minister of Federal Capital Territory. This is a man who was found guilty of a Senate committee of terrible and unspeakable fraud and told not to hold public office for the next ten years. But then, all that has to wait till the wrap up of this piece, when we shall see what all this has to do to the man’s current quixotic efforts.
 
 
Even if El-Rufai who claims to be a wizard in any new field he blunders into, including when he was undergoing tutelage in development studies during the Obasanjo era when he rubbed shoulders with the likes of Professor Chukwuma Soludo, Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Mrs. Obiageli Ezekwesili, all who have amply extolled the management capacity of Governor Peter Obi and have often given an imprimatur to his development strategies. In fact, el-Rufai is an artful manipulator who twists any position he finds himself, including writing a column in a flagship newspaper, to claim laurels which he does not deserve in any form. I have no business defending Governor Obi, but being the governor of my state at a time when I am well appraised on the situation in my state, as well as the motives of the writer are suspicious, there is no way I can stand by and watch an El-Rufai drag my state, its government and pride to the mud.
 
 
If El-Rufai had ever physically gone to Anambra State, he would have understood the idiocy of the statistics he employed to interpret what he describes as the ‘poverty’ of the people and the state of Anambra. It has been said that there are three types of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics. El-Rufai has proven to be the master of all the variants of lies. Even while informed Nigerians look on, El-Rufai lies about poverty in the state where the per capita standard of living is about the highest in Africa. He describes Anambra State as a ‘rural state’ with a high level of unemployment even as he refuses to acknowledge that more than three-quarters of communities in that state have installed electricity and other forms of amenities by themselves. These are people who build their own roads, secondary schools, hospitals and cottage industries and where no Anambra indigene has been stopped from going to school on account of financial difficulties.
 
 
This is a state where every village has assumed or is assuming an urban status, even as the entire state is growing into a one-town community. If one is driving through the state, it would be difficult to know when one has entered the next local government area. This has been made even more possible through the network of road which has linked or is linking every hamlet in the state. While it is true that the road construction feat was started by Dr. Chris Ngige, it would be stupid not to acknowledge that it was Mr. Peter Obi who has linked all the parts of the state through his array of road networks and bridges which have reached areas which had never dreamt of road communications in their lives. Incidentally, those areas are mostly the hitherto locked out and obscured food baskets of the nation.
 
 
El-Rufai talks about poverty of Anambra people because in his immaturity, he sticks to the classroom definitions of poverty where he divides the amount someone earns over the number of days in the month. That being so, he himself must have been a very poor man too, because hardly can the take-away pay of any public official in Nigerian take him home, and so, if he could garner estates and mansions all over Abuja and the world with his earnings as a minister, then he needs account to Nigerians. Having said so, my people in Anambra State are very communally minded people and as he even acknowledged, we are among Nigeria’s most successful Nigerians materially and professionally. In our system, we speak of “Aku luo uno” doctrine, which translates into the fact that we export all our fortunes home because that is only where we consider them secure and safe from such haters as el-Rufai and friends. They should understand that unlike where he comes from, Igbo fortunes spread to kinsmen.
 
 
El-Rufai might have thought that he succeeded in his ploy, alongside other Igbo haters like Obasanjo, to impoverish Igbo people by destroying all their properties in Igboland and allocating them to his people and himself. It must have been a very sad fact to him that he hardly succeeded and that must have been why he rued, that ’75 percent of the property in Abuja belong to Ndigbo and that FCT qualified to be described as the sixth South East State”. Does El-Rufai know that Anambra investors own about half of those Igbo investments in FCT, and not any of them had stolen the money with which they invested?
 
 
It is foolish to speak of misplaced budgeting in Anambra State because the government of the day did not put more funds in areas that El-Rufai, in his myopia, was informed by his ‘researchers’ to be more beneficial to the people. How is the man supposed to know where the eyes and priorities of the people lie? While the ANIDS development philosophy of government is geared towards spreading investments to all the crannies and circumstances in the state, Anambra people do not expect to be spoon-fed by any government; that is why the likes of El-Rufai would never understand that the so-called unemployment does not mean to an Anambrarian what it means to el-Rufai’s fellow Kaduna citizen. In fact, an Anambra person is not very hot about being employed by the government, as in fact, the concept of Olu Oyibo is not often a very attractive option. In fact, when el-Rufai believes that the government misplaces its priority when it invests less in agriculture than in education or roads, it clearly means he does not understand the Igbo persona.
 
 
It is needless to inform el-Rufai that our people are entrepreneurs and expect the government not to meddle in their lives more than it should. They just expect the government to equip their schools with good teachers and facilities. I did not say that we expect the government to build schools for us because we, have built them through our missions and communities and up till early this year, when Governor Obi handed over more than 1000 primary schools and many secondary schools to their owners, people had grumbled over government messing up things in those schools. A community that built and equipped secondary schools as out 177 communities had done could not be regarded as poor by any stretch of imagination, no matter what the crooked statistics say. In the same token, we expect the government to build our roads and provide policemen and other security officials to watch over and secure our lives and property. And should the appropriate government believes that means doing us a lot of favour, we strive to provide it for ourselves, as we did with the Bakassi Boys.
 
 
It is those states where beggars move around in droves and constitute a menace to daily life that are really poor. Poor people beg; in Anambra, the only beggars we have speak el-Rufai’s language.
 
 
In the next part of this article, I will strive to educate el-Rufai and his misguided analysts on the true nature of the Anambra person when it comes to industry, commerce and entrepreneurship that has made the state the destination of choice by an array of investors, who are genuine and well-meaning. I will also elaborate on the falsity of el-Rufai’s thesis as it concerns the exploitation of natural resources, so as to show how shallow those analyses have been relative to my state.
 
 
It surprises me that a man who flaunts several exposures forgets that in today’s world, intellectual property avails more than all the coal and gold that is under the feet. For, how did Japan become the world’s second largest economy without any discernable natural resources? It might interest the likes of el-Rufai, whose intellect is often questionable, to become aware that the best resource of Anambra State is their bold and bright people, who dare wherever and whenever the need arises.
 
 
I will also make an expose to debunk the wishful thoughts of the el-Rufais of this world that Anambra could be deterred by such bogus analyses of jaundiced writers who are seeking undeserved relevance and attention. I will do that by exposing the fallacies in El-Rufai’s analyses of Anambra’s political economy, concentrating on such factors as his take on criminality, natural resources and the way our people view the current efforts to open Anambra to the world to which our people have always looked. After that, those who do not know el-Rufai as many of us do, would start to have a clearer inkling into the man whose stock in trade is to run with the hare and chase with the hound…
 
So Nasir el-Rufai, keep your powder dry.
 
 
Uche Ezechukwu
 
*Photo Caption - Mallam El-Rufai

 - Masterweb Reports
 

Masterweb News Desk reliably gathered there were no survivors in Dana Air Boeing MD-83, operating as flight 997 that crash in Lagos on Sunday at approximately 3:43 pm (10:43 am ET) local time in Iju Ishaga, a little over 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) north of the airport. The Dana aircraft with 146 passengers and 7 cabin crew, en-route from Abuja to Lagos, crashed into a three-storey building and exploded into flames. The plane first crashed through a furniture store, then into the three-storey residential building next to it. The crash impact extensively damaged the furniture store, but partially on the three-storey building, as the plane’s nose was the only section that penetrated the later structure. Debris from the plane and badly burnt body parts littered the crash site. Ten people were killed on the ground according to reports. Two fire trucks and 50 emergency personnel were on the crash site an hour after the incident.

 
Thousands watched as firefighters battled the flames; some reported burning bodies in the wreckage. Eyewitnesses said they heard passengers crying for help. One eyewitness said: “They were crying, help, help, help but no one could do anything after the plane had crashed. We all rushed to the scene after the plane crashed but we did not know what to do as the smoke was too much for us. Somebody in the crashed plane, we don’t know whether it was a passenger or the pilot, tried to escape, but was burnt to death.”

 
Search by firefighters, residents and rescue workers for bodies and, hopefully, survivors continued through the night and into Monday. More than 80 bodies had been recovered by 1.00 am Monday local time, 10 of which belonged to residents of the building/area.

 
Though Nigeria aviation authorities are still carrying out investigations to determine the cause of the crash, Masterweb Reports reliably gathered both engines of the plane failed as it prepared landing. It is not clear what led to the failure of both engines at the same time, but aviation experts who spoke to Masterweb Reports on condition of anonymity said they did not rule out poor maintenance. Six Chinese nationals were on board the ill-fated flight. The pilot according to confirmed reports was an American and the co-pilot, an Indian. Many rule out human (pilot) error in the crash.

 
Princess Stella Oduah, Nigeria Aviation Minister on Sunday said she was saddened by the crash; in her words, speaking at a news conference at the Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) headquarters said: “Today at 3.43 pm local time , DANA Air flight 0992 from Abuja to Lagos declared an emergency with the Lagos Control Tower at eleven nautical miles to Murtala Muhammed Airport( MMA). A minute later, the aircraft disappeared from the air traffic control radar. The flight was found to have crashed into a residential building at Iju area of Agege with 153 people on board. The police, National Emergency Management Agency ( NEMA), rescue teams from the airport, Lagos State , Ogun State and other agencies were at the crash site within minutes, At this time, no survivor have been found. Our hearts and prayers go out to the families of the passengers and the people on the ground who lost their lives in this tragedy. The Federal Government will ensure that this incident is thoroughly investigated to determine the exact cause of the accident in order to prevent a similar occurrence in the future.”

 
Dana Air had its maiden flight in November 2008 and now operates 18 domestic daily flights to Lagos, Abuja, Port Harcourt and Uyo. In August 2010, U.S. gave Nigeria FAA's Category 1 status, its top safety rating which allowed the nation's domestic carriers to fly directly to U.S. Nigeria’s aviation is not without problems - radar screens may go blank from electric power failure which is rampant in Nigeria, airports inclusive. Sunday crash is the second involving Nigerian planes in two days. On Saturday, a cargo plane belonging to Allied Air overshot the runway in Kotoka International Airport, Ghana, and crashed into a mini bus, killing 10 people. Dana crash is Nigeria's worst aviation disaster since 1992 when a military C-130 went down after takeoff in Lagos, killing all 200 on board.

 
Among the victims of Dana Air flight 997 crash are the Group General Manager, Public Affairs Division of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Dr. Levi Ajuonuma; and Ehime Aikhomu, son of the late ex-military Vice-President Augustus Aikhomu. Below is manifest of Dana flight that crashed in Lagos

 
Onita Jennifer, Ike ochonogo, John Ahmadu, Onyeka Ayene, Hurriya Lawal, Berkisum Yindadi, Ebuka Enuma, Oluchi Onyenyiri, Sunday Enuma, George Moses, Noah Anyene, Kamsi Anyene, Stamford Obruste, Kayinentochi Anyene, Okeke Hope, Rev Ayodeji, Ngozi Cole, Ailende Ehi, Oluwasegun Funmi Abiodun, Shehu Usman, Alade Martins, Onita Josephine, Ike Ochonogo, John Amadu, Aquade Roger, Osunbade Aderoju, Fatokun Anjola, Fatokun Olaoluwa, Ajani Adenike, Ike Abugu, Adijolola Abraham, Otegbeye Adiza, Ehioghae Sonny, Abikale Otatori, Ntoku Charles, Anibaba Tosin, Shobowale Femi, Somolu Oluwafemi, Ariyibi Temitope, Ojugbana Amaka, Ojugbana Xtopher, Muti, Yusuf Ali, Lt Col Chumbo Ochigbo, D Awani, O Awani, N Chidiac, Li Huizhu, Kang Yi, Inuza Ahmed, Fayzal, Mojekwu Adeobi, Ibrahim D, Peter Nosike, Mahmud Aliyu, Nnadi John, Akwezi Elizabeth, Adedunni Dorothy, Maria Okulehi, Jennifer Ibe, Mtshelia Sarah, Onyeagocha Chidinma, Ike Okoye, Amaka Raphael, Garba Abdu, Abdu Aisha, Benson Oluwayemi, Taiwo Lamidi, Awodogan Oluwasanmi, Major Ig Mohammed, Attah Antonia, Li Riu, Ifeanyi Orakwe, Obina Akabueze, Chukwuemeka Okere, Adekunbi Adebiyi, Wasa Ruth, Nabil Garba, Ibrahim Jangana, Okikiolu Olukayode, Komolafe Olugbenga, Dike Chinwe, Olusola Arokoya, Olukoya Banji, Saka Otaru, Yusuf Ibrahim, Ikpoki Abiola, Levi Ajuonuma, Mbang.

 
President Goodluck Jonathan declared a three-day national mourning in memory of the victims of the Dana Air crash. He directed that the national flag be flown at half mast for the three days of mourning. Jonathan also cancelled all public engagements scheduled for Monday. The cause of the Dana Air crash is yet to be determined, but questions are being raised about the age of Dana’s planes. In 2010, Nigeria banned all planes over 20 years old. According to Planespotters.net, the average age of Dana’s fleet of five planes is 21.4 years, its newest plane is 20.9 years old.

 
*Photo Caption – Policemen, firefighters and rescue workers at Dana Air flight 997 crash site, Sunday, June 3, 2012.