Translational inhibition due to CHEAP RETIN-A the fact that the path of the excitation occurs Br neuron. recurrent inhibition     Carried intercalary brake cells (Renshaw). Axons of buy nolvadex online canada motor neurons often give collaterals (branches), ending with Renshaw cells. Renshaw cell axons terminate on the body or dendrites of the motor neuron, forming inhibitory synapses. Arousal that occurs in motor neurons travel in a straight path to the skeletal muscle, as well as collaterals to inhibitory neurons, which send impulses to motoneurons and inhibits them. The stronger the motor neuron excitation, the more excited Renshaw cells and the more intense they exert their inhibitory effect, which protects nerve cells from overstimulation. lateral inhibition    
 

-Masterweb Reports
 
There is no doubt that the Niger Delta region is blessed with natural resources. Apart from oil, the region is also endowed with some of the country’s most fertile land. Ironically, inhabitants of the region are not reaping the fruits of nature’s bounties as much as expected because of years of environmental degradation. Thus, majority of its people are still living and dying in poverty.

 
Assessing the level of poverty among the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria in 2006, the Central Bank of Nigeria, observed that south-south geopolitical zone is the worst hit by poverty among the three zones in southern part of the country. Before the oil boom era, more than 95 per cent of the people in the region were engaged in agriculture. Since Shell first struck oil in Oloibiri in 1956, unquantifiable oil spills have continued to pollute the water and soil while dangerous gases from gas flares poison the air across the region, destroying the livelihoods of fishermen and farmers.

 
To make matters worse, the Nigerian nation had come to depend almost entirely on crude oil for economic survival. The result, of course, is inadequate investment in the agricultural sector. Indeed, annual production of both cash and staple food crops dropped significantly since oil money came into the economic matrix. For example, although Nigeria was the world’s largest cocoa exporter in 1960, cocoa production has since dropped to a dismal 250,000 Metric Tonnes per annum placing her behind Ghana and Cote d’ Ivoire. Similarly, other cash crops such as rubber, palm produce, cotton and groundnuts, which were major foreign exchange earners before oil, have lost their export appeal.

 
Recognizing that Nigeria was once able to produce enough food to feed its people, as well as supply raw materials to local industries and still have enough for export, the Federal Government seems poised for a change of course. According to the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr Akinwumi Adesina, the production of locally milled rice would increase from 2.21 metric tonnes to 6.4 million metric tonnes annually by 2015. To achieve this, he said that the government would attract 100 large rice millers into the country and form cluster rice farms around the mills. Obviously, the high rate of rice importation gives government officials the jitters, considering the country’s ever growing population. Nigeria is not only the largest consumer of rice in Africa; it also eats more than it produces. One can, therefore, understand the minister’s eagerness to turn things around. He has promised to make agriculture earn for the nation what crude oil does at the moment.

 
As part of the efforts to make good this promise, Nigeria recently sealed a deal with a US manufacturing firm, for the production of 300,000 tractors with a view to encouraging large-scale farming. The partnership, involving delegates from USAID and the U.S. Bureau for Food Security (BFS), is expected to attract an investment worth 60 million dollars into Nigeria’s agricultural sector. Dr. Adesina said that the ultimate goal was to create employment for our teeming graduates as it is estimated that roughly 4 .5 million youths were entering our already saturated labour market every year. Another country which has shown interest in the development of modern agriculture in Nigeria is Israel. This is a country that is exporting food and earning as much as $714 million yearly, while Nigeria is spending billions of naira on the importation of food. Interestingly, Israel that is reaping huge sums from the exportation of agricultural produce is in the heart of the desert, unlike Nigeria with abundant fertile land. So, the Jewish State owes its success in agriculture to the deployment of modern technology. They have demonstrated in various spheres of life that technology is the key to economic power in the modern world.

 
Last year, the Israeli ambassador to Nigeria, Mr. Moshe Ram, said he was happy that Israel was collaborating with Nigeria to return the Niger Delta to a major food-producing zone in the country. He recalled that palm produce used to flourish in the region and expressed happiness that Israeli expertise would help to bring back those days of glory.

 
In fulfillment of the pledge, the Israeli embassy is collaborating with the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) to rejuvenate and modernize agricultural practices in the oil-producing region. The NDDC has also entered into partnership with other stakeholders in its efforts to reactivate the agricultural potential of the Niger Delta and empower farmers to reclaim their livelihoods.

 
The Managing Director of the commission, Dr.Chris Oboh, said it was very necessary that agriculture was revived to make it a major economic activity in the Niger Delta region. He made the pledge at a ceremony to formally welcome 11 trainees from India, who received specialised trainings on mechanised farming and repair of farm equipment. “We are focused on diversifying our local economy in a manner that will drastically reduce our dependence on oil,” Oboh said.

 
He said the commission would vigorously pursue programmes that would boost agriculture to make it rival the oil sector as a major income earner in the region. Oboh urged the beneficiaries of the training to use their skills and knowledge to further boost the development of agriculture in the region.

 
The NDDC had been running agricultural training programmes in conjunction with Songhai Delta, a reputable capacity building and youth empowerment centre based in Amupke, Delta State. The scheme aimed at training youths in Niger Delta in various aspects of agriculture, took off in January 2008. The NDDC said it has trained over 6,500 youths of the region in various agricultural practices.

 
The commission has promised to increase food supply by building rice processing mills across the oil producing states to produce rice in commercial quantity. According to Dr. Godspower Amadi, NDDC’s deputy director, agric and fisheries, “we started commercial rice farming as far back as 2007 with nine pilot farms in the region. Our giant rice processing plant at Elele Alimini in Rivers State will soon start churning out tonnes of high quality rice.”

 
Today’s farming cannot be anything but science-driven with the requisite technical sophistry. The NDDC is well aware of this fact, hence its contributions to the transition from subsistence farming to modern agricultural practices. Just last year, the interventionist agency donated 27 tractors to the Oil Producers Trade Section (OPTS) group, for delivery to farmer cooperatives in their respective host communities. The OPTS is supported by the major oil companies.

 
Engineer Anthony Abolarin of Total, who received keys to the tractors on behalf of the OPTS members, described the event as unique and monumental. He said that the handing over of the tractors by the NDDC demonstrates the level of understanding and cooperation between the commission and oil companies.

 
It is only through this kind of intervention that the oil producing communities and indeed the entire country can be empowered to meaningfully engage in mechanized agriculture that would make Nigeria to become self-surficient in food production. It will also help the nation to reduce its ever-rising food import bills, which according to the Nigerian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Dr. Dalhatu Tafida, stands at about 10 billion dollars annually.

 
This worrying situation is stirring some state governments into action. The Rivers State government is one of those that have taken up the challenge. According to the Governor, Rt. Hon. Chibuike Rotimi Amaechi, agriculture would be made the mainstay of the state economy in no distant time. Thus, the government has put pen to paper with an Israeli-based firm, LR Group Limited for a multi-billion naira 2000-hectare farm in Etche Local Government. Governor Amaechi said the development was part of the efforts by his administration to shift emphasis from oil-dependent economy to an agro-based economy.

 
The administration of Senator Bukola Saraki and the present government of Abdulfatah Ahmed took Kwara State to a new level of commercial agriculture. Saraki cleared the grounds for agrarian revolution when he invited white Zimbabwean farmers in 2004 to introduce modern technology to farming in the state.

 
Apparently, the message is beginning to sink in. Technology is the key to the agricultural revolution needed to lift Nigeria from the status of a mono-cultural economy.

 
Mr. Ifeatu Agbu ( ifeatuagbu@yahoo.com ) writes from Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

 
*Photo Caption - Map of Nigeria's Niger Delta Region showing Port Harcourt

-Masterweb Reports
 

(Onitsha- Nigeria, 3rd September 2012)-In 2007, Nigeria’s total debt stocks, both domestic and foreign, came down to about $16.5Billion from over $46Billion in 2005. While domestic debt remained at about $13Billion (N1.8trillion, using an exchange of N140.00 per US Dollar), foreign debt was heavily rescheduled downwards to about $3.5Billion from its all time high of $36Billion in 2005, thanks to the sagacity of Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, who led the country out of the external debt burden with the payment of a whopping sum of $12Billion to liquidate the debt of $18Billion. Nigeria’s external foreign exchange reserves as at that time was $60Billion excluding $20Billion in the excess crude oil account. But as at July 2012, the country’s excess crude oil balance and foreign reserve accounts have been depleted to $6.9Billion and $36.93Billion respectively. Globally, as of July 2012, China’s foreign exchange reserves had risen to $3Trillion from $2.3Trillion in 2010 and $700Billion in 2006; the Country of Taiwan under this same period (July 2012) had $391Billion; Brazil $376Billion; South Korea $312.3Billion; Hong Kong $294Billion; Singapore $243Billion; and Indonesia $106Billion (WIKIPEDIA 2012). It is important to point out that Nigeria’s Gross Domestic Product in 1965 was far ahead of those of Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea and Indonesia. For instance, in 1965, Nigeria’s GDP was $5.8Billion whereas those of Indonesia and Malaysia were $3.8Billion and $3.1Billion respectively (source: National Open University of Nigeria 2004). The last time Nigeria recorded federal budget surplus was in 1997 during the Abacha’s inglorious epoch when N37Billion budget surplus was recorded. From the 1999 budget till date including the draft 2013 budget of N4.929Trillion (about $31,5 Billion, using an exchange rate of N155.00 per US Dollar), it has been budget deficits or “loans for budget execution” all through.

 
Today, as at March 2012, Nigeria’s total debt profile, both domestic and foreign, had risen to N6.8Trillion or $44Billion, out of which domestic debts accounted for N5.96 Trillion or $38.3Billion(DMO 2012),from N1.8Trillion or about $13Billion in 2007, while the foreign aspect increased to N919Billion or $5.9Billion from about $3.5Billion(about N495Billion) in 2007. Apart from the foreign debts where the36 States and the FCT have a share of over $2Billion, the N5.96 Trillion domestic debt is solely owed by the Federal Government on behalf of 160 million Nigerians. From records available to Intersociety, the least owing State in Nigeria, domestically, owes at least N2Billion, whether as “loans” or “credit facilities”. While few States such as Anambra have refused to be loan-ridden, many others like Imo and Abia have local debts overhang of over N100Billion and N50Billion respectively. Lagos State also maintains a heavy burdensome foreign debt of over $790Million or about N118Billion and undisclosed domestic debts believed to be running into tens of billions of Naira. Though most of the 36 States in Nigeria shrouded their domestic loans’ status in secrecy, but our findings indicate that 70% of these States owe between N20Billion and N150Billion each to the local lending institutions with very hash borrowing conditions including high interest rates and penalties.

 
Nigeria’s budget policies have remained crudely stagnated and one of the most fraudulent, anti development and anti people in the world. A careful study of the country’s national budget policies sadly shows that 70% to 80% of the annual budgets have consistently been stomached by less than 0.5% of the country’s population particularly the 17,500 top elected and appointed public officers in the country, in the form of “recurrent expenditures”(personnel and overhead costs). There are 13,500 top elected public officials in Nigeria with the 774LGAs (local government areas) accounting for roughly 92% or 12,788, comprising 8,692 LGAs councilors and 3,096 LGAs executives. And there are 4,000 top appointed public officials in the country, bringing the total to 17,500 top public officers managing Nigeria’s public affairs. Further break down shows that there are 1,152 State lawmakers, 469 Federal lawmakers, 72 elected State executives and two elected Federal executives, bringing the total to 1,695 elected State and Federal lawmakers and executives. In the area of top Federal and State appointed public officials in the country, there are 2,592 top State appointed executives, 470 Federal appointed executives and 934 top Federal and State judicial officers, bringing the total to 3,996.There are approximately 24,165 inferior and unconstitutional public aides in Nigeria recruited by the 17,500 top elected and appointed public officials recognized in the Salaries & Allowances amended Act of 2008.Despite the fact that the Act in quote as well as the Constitution of Nigeria 1999 as amended, does not recognize these inferior public aides, their sustenance under “allowance pay” has continued to be borne by Nigeria’s lean public wealth. Between N15Billion and N20Billion is spent annually to maintain these 24,165 inferior public aides. The 12,788 LGA top officials in Nigeria hire about 13,000 inferior aides in the form of “personal assistants” with average monthly “allowance pay” scale of N20, 000/N30, 000 per “PA”. Average of one “PA” is attached to one LGA official.

 
Further, the 2,664 State executives including the country’s 72 governors and deputies hire about 6,000 inferior aides called “senior special assistants”, “special assistants”, “executive assistants” and “personal assistants” with average monthly “allowance pay” scale of N100,000 each, on the premise of two aides per State executive. The 1,152 State lawmakers in the country hire about 2,300 inferior aides called “special assistants” and “personal assistants” with monthly “allowance pay” for each of them ranging from N50, 000 to N100.000. Average of two aides is attached to one State lawmaker. The 472 federal executives including the President and the Vice President hire 960 inferior aides called “ senior special assistants”, “special assistants”, “executive assistants” and “personal assistants” with monthly “allowance pay” ranging from N100,000 to N300,000 for each aide. Average of two inferior aides is attached to a federal executive.The 469 federal lawmakers hire about 950 inferior aides called “senior special assistants”, “executive assistants”, “special assistants” and “personal assistants” with monthly “allowance pay” ranging from N50, 000 to N150.000 per aide. Average of two inferior aides is attached to a federal lawmaker. The 934 Federal/State top judicial officers (justices and judges) hire about 950 inferior aides with monthly “allowance pay” ranging from N50, 000 to N150, 000. Usually, average of one inferior aide is attached to a top judicial officer, but in the case of CJN, CJs, Grand Kadis and Presidents of the Customary Court of Appeal, average of two inferior aides is attached to each of them.

 
According to the Vanguard Newspaper of June 7, 2010, “over 60% of the N31Trillion spent between 2006 and 2010 fiscal years went for recurrent expenditures, out of which N10Trillion was spent to sustain the 17,500 top Nigerian elected and appointed public officials”. Also N12Trillion went for the execution of capital projects and debt servicing, while the remaining N9trillion was spent on overheads and other public/civil servants in the country. Out of the N12Trillion said to have been spent on capital expenditures and debt servicing, over N2Trillion went for debt servicing. This means that only N9Trillion was spent on the execution of capital projects that service Nigeria’s 160million population including her 17,500 top public officials. In the 2010 and 2011 fiscal years, for instance, over N1.1Trillion was spent on Nigeria’s debt servicing particularly on her local debts. In the 2012 budget of N4.877Trillion, a whopping sum of N559.6Billion was earmarked for debt servicing. Nigeria, according to Dr. Ngozi Okonjo- Iweala and the Vanguard Newspaper (11th August 2012),” has made a total budgets of N32.24Trillion between 2005 and 2013”, a period of eight years, yet they have substantially remained “budgets of intestine”, feeding fat less than 1% of the population and starving the remaining 99% of the Nigerian population(160m). The breakdown shows that in 2005, the Federal budget was N1.8Trillion; 2006 N1.9Trillion; 2007 N2.3Trillion; 2008 N3.58Trillion; 2009 N3.76Trillion; 2010 N4.61Trillion; 2011 N4.484Trillion; 2012 N4.877Trillion; and 2013 N4.929Trillion(draft) with a projected revenue of N3.891Trillion and revenue deficit of over N1trillion earmarked for the 2013 draft budget.

 
Further, out of the 2012 budget of N4.877Trillion, only N1.3Trillion was earmarked for capital expenditure, with additional N200Billion from the oil subsidy removal proceeds making the total N1.5Trillion. Sadly and shocking too, only N404Billion or 31% had been released for the execution of capital projects as of the end of July 2012 whereas releases for recurrent expenditure were at over 70%. Nigeria has the lowest public service productivity index in Africa, and by extension, in the whole world. Four out of every five Nigerian public/civil servants are pathologically lazy, unproductive and fraudulent. The job satisfaction index among them is very low and the culture of wealth accumulation is very high. An average Nigerian public/civil servant aspires at all costs to be an expensive property and estate owner, and lives far above his or her income. This explains why the country’s budgets have substantially remained oil, gas and deficit (loan)-based. While oil & gas contributes to 95% of Nigeria’s foreign exchange earnings, it contributes 80% to the country’s annual budgets. In the 2011 budget of N4.484Trillion, a whopping sum of N852Billion was borrowed to finance the budget. In the 2012 fiscal year, N744Billion was borrowed to finance the revenue shortfalls in the year’s budget of N4.877Trillion and in the incoming 2013 draft budget of N4.929Trillion; another whopping sum of N727Billion has been earmarked for borrowing to make up the expected revenue shortfalls. This is in spite of enormous revenue potentials including availability in enormous commercial quantity of roughly 33 solid mineral deposits in the country.

 
It is rudely shocking and disbelieving that the staggering sum of over N1.15Trillion is spent annually on 17,500 Nigerian public managers including their over 24,000 inferior aides, whereas less than 30% of the entire budget is merely allocated for the maintenance of the 160 million Nigerians through the provision and maintenance of critical infrastructures and other social amenities. According to the Nigeria’s Salaries & Allowances amended Act of 2008, N1, 13Trillion is spent on the 17,500 Nigerians annually with over 90% going into allowance packages. Before the 2008 amendment of the Act, N755Billion was spent annually to service these 17,500 top Nigerians. Out of this whopping sum of N1,15Trillion, N592Billion is spent on 12,788 LGAs’ top officials; N300Billion is spent on 2,664 State executives; N98.3Billion is spent 472 federal executives; and N60.4Billion is spent on 469 federal lawmakers excluding the whopping sum of N100Billion spent annually on the so called “constituency projects”. For the 1,152 State lawmakers, N40.9Billion is spent on them; N18.5Billion is spent on 792 State top judicial officers; and N14.8Billion is spent on 142 top federal judicial officers.

 
Apart from this huge public expenditure on the 17,500 top public managers in Nigeria with their over 24,000 inferior aides, many, if not most of them, both past and present have stolen roughly $500billion from the country’s public coffers since 1960. From 1995 when the total stolen wealth was put at $55Billion, it increased to $60Billion in 1999 and quadrupled to $250Billion in December 2006 (Ribadu & EFCC 2007). Malam Nuhu Ribadu and the World Bank also believe that $380Billion and $300Billion respectively had been stolen by Nigerian political criminals between 1960 and 2006. We at Intersociety believe that over $500Billion had been stolen between 1960 and August 2012. The stealing has become a habitual practice in Nigeria’s public governance.

 
The Part Two of this research-statement is being worked on and will be released in coming days.

 
Signed:

 
1. Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman, BOT. International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law, Nigeria +234(0)8033601078, +234(0)8180103912
umeagbalasi@yahoo.com, info@intersociety-ng.org
Website: intersociety-ng.org

 
2. Comrade Justice Ijeoma, Head, Publicity Desk

 
A Research-Statement By Intersociety Nigeria

 
*Photo Caption - Disgraced and Jailed Delta State Governor, James Ibori 

-Masterweb Reports

 
With barely one month to the expiration of the ten-year window of grace allowed by the International Court of Justice for an appeal on the ill-fated judgment on Bakassi, hope seems to be dwindling by the hours as the Nigerian government is yet to make any categorical statement on the Bakassi problem.
 
It could be recalled that after the ICJ judgment in 2002, former president Olusegun Obasanjo had unilaterally signed what is today known as Green Tree Agreement (GTA) on June 12, 2006 with President Paul Biya of Cameroon, under the pruning supervision of representatives of United Kingdom, United States of America, France and Germany, transferring the territory.
 
Initial protest against the ceding:
 
In 2006 shortly after the signing of the Green Tree Agreement in New York, United States of America, some Bakassi indigenes, who foresaw the implications of the ceding, had protested and consequently challenged it at the Federal High Court, Abuja.
 
The plaintiffs were Chief Tony Ene Asuquo, Chief Orok Eneyo, Chief Emmanuel Effiong Etene, Ndabu Eyo-Umo Nakanda, Emmanuel Okokon Asuquo, Ita Okon Nyong and Richard Ekenyong.
 
They had asked for an order of perpetual injunction restraining the federal government from expelling or removing them from Bakassi or handing their homeland to Cameroon. The court case was won by the Bakassi people but the federal government refused to recognize the judgment.
 
Apart from the rejection of the High Court ruling by Abuja, the litigants were also intimidated and threatened. Chief Etene and his partners have gory tales to tell about their experiences in the hands of Nigerian authorities. But, despite this, the struggle for the soul of Bakassi had continued. Many lives have been lost, one of which was that of Chief Tony Ene.
 
Investigations revealed that when the Nigerian government blatantly refused to honour the court injunction stopping the ceding, out of annoyance and frustration, Ene decided to form a militant group, known then as Bakassi Movement for Self-Determination. This was to press home the emancipation of his people, but he paid the supreme price for daring the government of the day in the early hours of August 22, 2006 in a questionable circumstance.
 
This writer gathered that Ene died along Calabar-Itu road at Odukpani axis while on a mission to petition the then Cross River State government for the release of Richard Ekenyong who was one of the plaintiffs in the Abuja case. Ekpenyong was detained by the State Security Service allegedly on the order of the government of Cross River State, coerced by Abuja. Eyes witnesses at the purported auto-clash site painted a gory picture of what actually transpired.
 
While bemoaning the fate of his people and the untimely death of Ene, Chief Eyo Nakanda who spoke with reporters shortly after the death of the Bakassi militant leader, had said “Tony is the first martyr of the struggle for the freedom of the Bakassi people”.
 
A government house source also disclosed to our reporter that “it was clear that activities of Ene and his group stood on the way of the purported N3 billion ‘largesse’, which was budgeted for the settlement of Bakassi”.
 
The ceding and the pains:
 
It remains a fact that despite all entreaties to convince the country’s leadership to change its mind, Nigerian authorities, on August 14, 2008 at the Peregrino Government Lodge in Calabar, finally transferred the territory to Cameroon despite the tears and groans of a people whose only strength was their voices which at that point was rendered useless by the high and mighty in Aso Rock.
 
That day, thick darkness of uncertain future had eclipsed that part of the world. Some Bakassi indigenes who witnessed the sober ceremonies had psychological and emotional break-down as they visualized bleak future for their posterity.
 
Old men in their respective villages received the sad tales with rude shock, instigated by fear of losing their heritage, culture, identity, source of livelihood, history, sepulchers of their fathers and indeed everything that matters in life. This shock led to sudden unexplained sicknesses and early graves. It was not a bad dream but an absolute reality; they were being given out cheaply without being conquered in war.
 
To some of them, the very thought of Cameroon had sent goose pimples down their spines but they were consoled with a promise that the federal government would look into their welfare and properly resettle the emotionally bruised people. Four years after, the assurance has tacitly become a mirage.
 
From August 14, 2008, many Nigerians have variously made several submissions on the Bakassi problem which gets complicated by the day. Factions with diverse interest have not also help matters. This is because, while majority of the Bakassi people are crying out for their homeland, others are groaning about the federal government’s inability to properly resettle the Bakassi people.
 
Expressing his frustration in a chat with our reporter in Calabar after being chased out of Atabong (now Idabato) by the brutality of soldiers of the Central African country, a 81 year old Chief Ita Asuquo noted with nostalgia that the federal government’s action on Bakassi reminds him of the story of Ikemefuna; the ill-fated lad from Mbaino as contained in Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart.
 
Chief Ita recalled that Ikemefuna had regarded Okonkwo as a father who, apart from playing the role of providing for his household, was destined to be a pillar of strength and protection to his family members.
 
“In that book, it was Okonkwo, Ikemefuna’s ‘father’ who unleashed on the innocent lad the final and fatal blow which killed him. If Ikemefuna must be sacrificed to the oracle of the hills and caves, must he be slain by his own ‘father’? Bakassi has been slain by a ‘father’ whose natural responsibility was to protect.
 
“Moreover”, he continued, “like Banquo’s ghost in Shakespearean classic-Julius Ceasar, the ghost of Bakassi has refused to go away and shall never go away. It daily haunts our national psyche, particularly when Cameroon’s cruelty on Nigerians is brought to the fore as narrated by some of those who are daily escaping from the peninsular,” Ita had submitted painstakingly.
 
The Chief-turned-refugee therefore warned Nigerian government to ensure nothing evil happens to the leader of the Bakassi Self Determination Front, Mr Ekpe Ekpenyong Oku over the recent development at the peninsular, stressing, “the sacrifice of Tony Ene is enough, and as they say, enough is enough”.
 
Gory tales from Bakassi
 
Furthermore, Nigerians from all walks of life today believe that Bakassi’s sad tale is fallout of international judicial ambush against Nigeria, and which the country’s leadership in its warped wisdom fell into sheepishly.
 
It is also very true that the story of Bakassi cannot all be told in a hurry. Few days ago, international media practitioners from United States of America and Germany had visited Bakassi for an on-the-spot assessment of situations in the ceded territory. As part of their routine, they had audience with a cross section of the Bakassi people.
 
Those who spoke included a 24 year old Asuquo Nyong Okon, Mrs Arit Essien, Prince Edet Etim Okon amongst others. All of them spoke in agreement about their gory experiences in the hands of the Cameroon gendarmes. 
 
Mrs Arit Essien, who betrayed emotion during her submission said, “Cameroon people treat us like animals and force us to pay plenty of money when their patrol boat accost us in the sea before we are allowed to pass to our villages which are now in their country.
 
“Whenever they visit your village, the people would run into the bush and those the Gendarmes would arrest in the village would have to pay a mandatory fee for Gendarmes’ welfare and transportation through a special contribution or they would beat you to a pulp. Some time, they would seize all the fishing nets and engines of our fishermen and would tell our people not to fish in their waters again.
 
"Bakassi is our ancestral home. We all know that the struggle for the soul of Bakassi is the oil, so if they want to take the oil, let them take the oil and leave our native home to us. If the Nigerian government is not ready to accommodate us, please help us stand on our own as a country.
 
“We are crying to the Nigerian government to help us because if they leave us at the mercy of the Cameroonians, they would kill us all. We all know how Cameroonians treat Nigerians. We are the Efiks tribes in our country home and we cannot abandon our land. If the Cameroon people want to kill us all, we have no option, we are ready to die”, she sobbed uncontrollably.
 
Furthermore, our reporter who monitored the happenings in the ceded territory submitted that the mood in Bakassi is that of disappointment, apprehension and annoyance. Majority of Bakassi people hope the ceding of their homeland would be reversed miraculously before October 12 timeline.
 
Chairman of Bakassi local government area, Dr Ekpo Ekpo Bassey told our reporter recently that all hope was not lost, adding “the Calabar Chiefs who signed the treaty of protection with the British did not tell the colonialists to give out part of Efik kingdom to the Germans. We were not colonized as such the Anglo-German treaty is not binding on us. We shall get back our land by God’s grace”.
 
In his opinion, amidst great annoyance, Etinyin Etim Okon Edet, paramount ruler of Bakassi , expressed unshaken believe that the peninsular shall come back to the real owners.
 
Addressing members of the House of Representatives Committee on Treaties and Agreement penultimate week, he had retorted angrily “Nigeria should leave us alone. There was a Bakassi before a political Nigeria and there was Bakassi before a political Cameroon.
 
“We have not been fairly treated by this nation and what we are looking for now is to go back to our area by any possible means. We don’t even want that so-called relocation or resettlement any longer. We have been left to roam in the streets for almost ten years now; some of our people who chose to remain in the ceded villages are now at the mercy of the gendarmes.
 
“Thousand of returnees were camped in an open field for months with their wives and children. Thereafter, the Cross River State government built for us a refugee camp. This camp could not contain influx of thousands of Bakassi returnee. I left my palatial mansion at Abana to the Cameroonian”, he stated.
 
Militants’ activities and declaration of independence
 
Furthermore, the Bakassi militants themselves have also been speaking from the creeks. The leaders of the militants group, Ekpenyong Oku said his people are ready to lay down their lives and that the boys have already taken over some villages in the peninsular, and added “we shall soon send video clips of our activities for all to see”.
 
In a message posted on the internet few days ago, Oku, who addresses himself as ‘Commandant-General’ said “the whole world should answer this question: if you own a land, and one inch of that land is taken by your neighbor without your consent and or approval, how will you feel?”
 
He thereafter went spiritual and said, “O Time, thou determine all things. If indeed this is the time, manifest thyself for all to see that thou have come. The people of Bakassi have been in bondage for about 10years with their land and resources taken away. They are homeless and some have died. Those who are now living have no hope for the future.
 
“Time, manifest thyself. If blood would be required to set the people free, take mine. As you confronted pharaoh, oh Time, do so now. Everybody here (militants in the creeks) has deserted food, Time, take this as a sacrifice and assist us on this onerous journey as we do not know when we shall return.
 
“Bakassi, land of our birth, we pledge to you, neither silver nor gold shall dissuade us from taking you back. We did not choose the land of our birth neither did we choose our parents, the Almighty placed us there, and we were uprooted in a broad-day light by a president who was supposed to protect us”.
 
Oku therefore disclosed that his group, apart from taking over Ine Ekoi village, “are now at Akpa Ukwak quite close to Akpankanya”, stressing “from our observations, no Cameroonian army is in Akpankanya. There is a satellite tower built at Abana, to monitor Akwa Ibom and Cross River with a mast. Firstly, we must bring it down and that will now turn to a full scale.... The Defence Minister at Yaoundé recently visited Abana and Akwa . We are yet to get full details from our intelligence.”
 
This indeed is the general mood in today’s Bakassi.  A one-time Chairman of Bakassi, Chief Emmanuel Etene in an advice said, “Nigerian government for once must be proactive because with what we are hearing, whether one believes it or not, a big problem approaches”
 
The final step
 
There are myriads of questions about Bakassi –the small but rich island which has surreptitiously become a global centre of attention. Some of these questions are: what would be the fate of the Bakassi people after the October 10, 2012 timeline? What is the way forward?
 
Answers to these questions may not be forthcoming but this writer recalls that during the visit of members of the House Committee on Treaties and Agreements to Bakassi penultimate week, Chairman of the Committee, Hon Yacoub Bush-Alebiousu, had given a glimpse of hope.
 
According to Alebiouse “nobody can feel the pains of Bakassi people than the people themselves. I can really appreciate why you are so bitter. I have sat here and I have tried to imagine what you are passing through, but I haven’t been able to because I am privileged to have an abode, to have shelter and not to roam the streets.
 
“We have listened to you; we would like something in writing. Those things in writing are what we would use to show and tell everybody, look the agreement has already been breached at this point and if at this point the people are passing through such ordeal, what do you think would happen after that October date?”
 
He promised the resolved of Nigerian government/National Assembly to do everything within its power to protect Nigerian citizens, and with such assurance, hope was rekindled particularly as the discussion revolved around revisiting the judgment.
 
But in his reaction to this, a Calabar-based legal practitioner, Barr Okoi Obono-Obla described as ‘medicine after death” any effort at revisiting the ICJ judgment.
 
Obla posited “the Judgment has been unequivocally accepted by Nigeria with her signing the Green Tree Agreement on the 12th June, 2002 in New York, the United States of America. Nigeria cannot therefore be allowed to approbate and reprobate.
 
“The equitable doctrine of estoppels shall operate against Nigeria in the event that she makes any attempt to repudiate the Green Tree Agreement signed nearly six years ago. Generally when estoppels bind a party to litigation, he is prevented from placing reliance on or denying the existence of certain facts. Therefore from the point of view of the party in whose favour it operates estoppels, it could be regarded as something which renders proof of certain facts unnecessary.
 
“It is clear that Article 61 of the Statutes (ICJ’s) shall not avail Nigeria in the event she makes an application to the ICJ for the revision of the judgment delivered on the 10thOctober, 2002 in favour of Cameroon. It is certain that no Lawyer worth his salt will ever proffer such advice to Nigeria to gamble by making such a frivolous application to the ICJ”, he had posited.
 
Corroborating, Professor Akin Oyebode, renowned international law scholar and Head of Department of International Law and Jurisprudence of the University of Lagos (UNILAG), Akoka, Lagos, in an interview recently, submitted that the possibility of a review is remote with a very big proviso.
 
According to him, “there must be new facts. In law, we have what is called Res Judicata. It means that a decided issue cannot be re-litigated except new facts emerge which were not before the court when the case was decided”.
 
Towing that same line, a professor of law in the University of Benin, Professor Itse Sagay had, shortly after the judgment submitted “we cannot apply for the revision of the judgment as some laymen have suggested because we cannot meet the conditions for revision. An application for revision can only be made, when it is based on the discovery of some fact of such a nature as to be a decisive factor which fact was when the judgment was given, unknown to the Court and also the partly claiming revision, always provided that such ignorance was not due to negligence (Art 61).
 
“We cannot claim that we did not know that the Kings, Chiefs and peoples of Bakassi, did not give their consent to the so-called cession of Bakassi, or that the inhabitants of Bakassi are Nigerians. Indeed these points were canvassed before the Court and in effect, rejected. Can we or the Court claim not to know the indispensable nature of self-determination or even plebiscite? In any case self-determination is not a fact, but a legal principle,” he had stated.
 
This may have explained why the Nigerian government has been dragging its feet since 2002 when the judgment was given.
 
But the Bakassi people have insisted that they are in possession of unchallengeable fresh facts which shall help to repudiate the ICJ judgment, and that the government should exploit this last chance. They argue that if the Efiks/Bakassi natives were involved in the legal team that represented Nigeria at The Hague, the story would have been different.
 
In a stakeholders meeting at Ikang recently, they faulted the ICJ judgment which was based on Anglo-German treaty of 1913, stressing that at no time was Bakassi a colony of Great Britain, which should have given the Britons authority to enter into any agreement with the Germans on behalf of the Bakassi people, and that even at that, “the purported 1913 Anglo-Germans.
 
Treaty was not endorsed by the parties. This renders that document invalid and illegal”.
 
Besides, experts believe the situation is not completely hopeless as the Nigerian authorities could salvage the situation through a ‘buy back deal’.
 
On this, Professor Akin Oyebode said “in my honest view, the only way to reset the relationship between Nigeria and Cameroon is either we go to war and win the territory back by force of arms, which is not unheard of in history or we buy back the Bakassi Peninsula from Cameroon. After all, Alaska was sold to the US by Russia”.
 
Lending his voice, a former General Manager of Cross River State Newspaper Corporation and commentator on national issues, Pastor Daniel Ubi said “the best option open for Nigeria is to buy back at least part of the peninsular for the Bakassi people.
 
“If appealing the ICJ’s judgment has become a technical impossibility, Nigeria should diplomatically initiate a buy-back deal with Cameroon. At least Western Bakassi that stretches from Abana to the left hand flank of Atabong down to Atai Ema, Archibong Town and Akwa axis could be bought back for the Bakassi people.
 
“It is not out of place to employ the services of experts in international relations to begin a process of a buy back deal. If Cameroon wants to explore oil in the said area, well, there could be a deal on this. Why sent a people to war on an issue which they cannot directly be blamed?
 
‘Whatever amount Cameroon would demand could be paid within a stipulated period of time. This would help the Bakassi people return home since there is no place in the world which the people would now call their home, especially as the possibility of living under Cameroonian government is very remote”, he had suggested.
 
Furthermore, some Nigerians are of the opinion that since the GTA has been blatantly violated by the Cameroonians, Nigeria could exploit this loophole to its advantage.
 
Leading this group is a member representing Odukpani and Calabar Municipality in the House of Representatives, Amb Nkoyo Toyo who, last week, raised an alarm that apart from forcing the people of Bakassi to change their identity overnight and imposing strict taxation on them, Cameroonians are maltreating, maiming and murdering scores of Nigerians daily, against the terms of the GTA. She appealed to the United Nations to call Cameroon to order.
 
“It appears the Cameroonian government is trying to use excessive force to establish its dominance over the Bakassi peninsula. This violates the already illegal Green Tree Agreement, and is a perfect opportunity for Nigeria to renegade on that Green Tree Agreement, not only on the grounds of responsibility to protect her citizens, but also on the grounds of a void treaty which has already been violated”, Ambassador Toyo submitted.
 
Professor Akin Oyebode seems to be in support of this position when he opined that “the GTA provided for the protection of Nigerian residents in the Bakassi and that Cameroon should not harass them and they should be allowed to carry out their activities without fear or molestation peacefully and peaceably.
 
“So the harassment of the fishermen in the area constitutes a material breach of that agreement which authorizes Nigeria to withdraw from or terminate that treaty. Under the law of treaties, we have a provision on termination of treaties where there is what we call material breach. If you look at Article 60 of the Vienna Convention on the law of Treaties, there is a basis for Nigeria to either withdraw or terminate the Green Tree Agreement. These are loopholes for Nigeria to exploit and win back the Peninsula from Cameroon”, he had submitted.
 
But some Nigerians have variously raised objections to this, stressing that the said maltreatments are mere allegations and speculations which cannot be substantiated. To this, the Bakassi natives say they have good and tangible proofs to nail Cameroon, and as such have called on Abuja to give them a chance to prove their assertion.
 
It is against this backdrop that Nigerians from Bakassi to Badagry, Wuse to Dutse, Ondo to Sokoto are unanimously praying for a way out of the imbroglio. October 12, 2012 beckons for a decision which shall assist in wiping away the unending tears of the Bakassi people.
 
Joseph Kingston reports from Cross River State, Nigeria.
 

*Photo Caption - Bakassi Self Determination Front flag ( Flag of purported new 'Bakassi Democratic Republic' ).

-Masterweb Reports
 
Soloman Onwukaife, an 18-year-old Nigerian American teenager Sunday morning around 4.30 am at an Austin, Texas-area (Cedar Park) Walmart shot five people in an earlier dispute over a girl. Onwukaife and the gunshot victims after the dispute at a different location, agreed to meet at the Walmart store for a fight. "This stemmed from a party that occurred possibly somewhere either in Williamson County or Leander, in which there was alcohol consumed at that party," Henry Fluck, Cedar Park Police Chief said  in a press statement.

 
According to Cedar Park police, fight broke out in the Walmart parking lot and Onwukaife began shooting hitting five people. The incident took place at a time when there were few customers in the Walmart store parking lot. No Walmart employee nor customer was injured in the shooting. The store closed briefly (as police sealed-off the area conducting investigations) and re-opened at 9 a.m. "This morning at 4:30 a.m. I heard a 'pop, pop, pop,' like firecrackers. All of a sudden I saw police and ambulance," an unidentified woman told reporters.

 
19-year-old Shayne Davis, 22-year-old Leland McGlocklin, 19-year-old Zacharia Gietl, 18-year-old Cody McGrath and an unidentified victim were wounded and taken to St. David’s Round Rock Medical Center. Davis, McGlocklin and McGrath remain in critical condition. Gietl, was treated and released the same day (Sunday). Onwukaife who suffered facial injuries was treated and handed back to police. He has been charged in court with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon in connection with the incident.

 
Gietl told police the dispute began when a man choked a woman at a nearby party earlier in the evening (Saturday) and several people agreed to fight at the Walmart parking lot. He said he was not at the party but went to the parking lot to stop his friends from continuing the fight.

 
*Photo Caption – Soloman Onwukaife in police custody

-Masterweb Reports
 
Two retired generals and former heads of state stirred up a hornet’s nest recently when they proffered solutions to the growing insecurity and hopelessness in the country. Coming on the heels of a war of attrition between them, there was enough reason for Nigerians to be guarded about the intervention by Olusegun Obasanjo and Ibrahim Babangida who ruled Nigeria cumulatively for 19 years.

 
The periods that these generals ruled (1976-79; 1985-93; and 1999-2007) were about the most glorious of the nation’s history, not in terms of development or genuine attempt to redefine the future of the country, but in terms of hope and desire on the part of Nigerians to lift up their country and make it a global contender. As it turned out, Obasanjo and Babangida made sure theirs were the years of the locust. Obasanjo and Babangida orchestrated perhaps the greatest despoliation of Nigeria, its wealth as well as human and material resources.

 
Obasanjo and Babangida talked about the greatness of Nigeria and Nigerians, but they did everything possible to undermine the country and its people. They had the opportunity to write their names in gold as true statesmen, but they botched it. Of course, on the personal level, both Obasanjo and Babangida have received adequate response to their unwelcomed intervention so I shall not dwell on that. I shall focus on the thrust of their intervention.

 
“Nigeria’s existence not negotiable – OBJ, IBB”, was how one newspaper headlined the intercession of the retired generals the morning after. The paper reported Obasanjo and Babangida as saying that “the worrying trend emerging from the violent attacks, bombings and mindless killings of innocent Nigerians was creating room for doubt about the end of the carnage, but that ‘the continued unity of this nation is not only priceless, but non-negotiable’”.

 
I wonder what our rulers really mean when they say the “unity of Nigeria is not negotiable”. If you hear this glib talk from people who actually did something to advance the unity of Nigeria, then it is understandable. It becomes worrisome when those who advance this proposition are those who have done everything possible to undermine the unity of the country. In simple terms, “negotiable” means “open to discussion; not fixed, but able to be established or changed through discussion and compromise”. Considering the current state of the nation, the social and political upheavals that go to the very core of national existence, only a masochist will deny that this is time to “negotiate” Nigeria.

 
A nation is usually united around a common national ethos, a set of values and principles that are abiding. Not so in Nigeria. For the ruling class in Nigeria, the only unifying factor is corruption, as one of their own, Governor Babangida Aliyu of Niger State, eloquently espoused in his speech at Chatham House, London, in June. For the majority of Nigerians, the unifying factor is a life of grinding poverty and hopelessness. No country sustained by corruption and the poverty and hopelessness of its citizenry can survive for too long.

 
In a sense, therefore, the real threat to the unity of Nigerian has come from those who have succeeded in dividing Nigerians through their pillage and misuse of our patrimony. Our rulers know that the country is not working because of massive corruption and that we can’t sustain the current system for too long. Yet, because our elite, and in some cases ordinary Nigerians, seem satisfied with the proceeds of corruption, they are blind to the danger we are all entrapped in. While we are nibbling at the seams of the nation, we willfully assume that the country will still hold together and that things will get better. It is this same false hope that led us to the London Olympics after just three months of preparation. The London games ended without any medal for Nigeria. Anybody who understands Nigeria will not be surprised that this may yet be our worst Olympics. Regrettably, our youths on whose shoulders the survival of this nation rests, appear to have imbibed the worst examples of the “wasted generation” before them. That is the real tragedy of our situation. Only recently, the African Centre for Media & Information Literacy held a lecture to mark the 2012 International Youth Day. It was meant as a sober occasion for our youths, the greatest resource of our nation, to reflect on their role and contribution to national development as well as the responsibility of the government to the youth. Many of the so-called youth leaders that came for this event arrived with much enthusiasm, with retinues of aides in tow. All someone close by could mutter was: “if these people ever come close to power, they will do worse than our current crop of rulers”.

 
When I look at corruption in Nigeria, our dismal showing in London, the attitude of our dehumanised and traumatised youths, and the war mongering going on, it all makes sense to me. The conclusion I have arrived at is that it is necessary but not sufficient to do critiques of sectoral deficiencies of our problems as a nation. Nigeria has collapsed. It is imperative, therefore, that the systemic dysfunction in Nigeria is confronted and changed to cater to all in a truly law governed country. And the only way to do this is to “negotiate” Nigeria through a Sovereign National Conference (SNC), not just of so-called ethnic nationalities, but also of marginalised and pauperised people of Nigeria.

 
Part of the reason corruption thrives so much in Nigeria is the structure of the country. Political violence is rife, states and ethnic nationalities are threatening secession, yet there are people who still insist that it is forbidden to question the status quo. Those who are really concerned about Nigeria and genuinely fear that the country will break up if it goes the route of SNC, as opposed to those who mouth “the unity of Nigeria is non-negotiable” should rest assured that it won’t happen without a very bloody war or wars. It is not exactly clear which ethnic nationality wants to embark on that futile journey. The greater prospect now is that of anarchy (as in Somalia) or the rise of fascism through what Edwin Madunagu describes as “a coalition of the most unlikely bed-follows’”.

 
What Nigeria needs now is a radical change that will redefine the country and create a new national ethos. It is for this reason that all those who have bled the country and brought it to its knees should be wary, not just of social media, but also the street anger of Nigerians.

 
This street anger must fester and yield positive results if we are to achieve a national renewal and end what a colleague has described as the hackers’ paradise called Nigeria.

 
Chido Onumah, Coordinator of the African Centre for Media & Information Literacy, Abuja, Nigeria ( Email: conumah@hotmail.com )

 
*Photo Caption - Map of Nigeria

-Masterweb Reports
 
Dating back to Fredrick Lugard's days, people at the top always desire to keep the masses in the dark while they rebarbatively divide and conquer. Thank goodness, there are always few brave souls who risk it all to fight every insidious “dual mandate”. They creatively use the media to liberate the oppressed and to give voice to the disenfranchised. Freedom of speech is the cornerstone of every true democracy.

 
When the likes of current Nigeria's Senate President Mark David call for heightened media censorship, Nigerian independent website operators should loudly protest. Citizens ought to draw a line in the sand and peacefully declare that the dog is not going to hunt anymore.

 
Nigerian website operators are today's freedom fighters with battle scares to prove it. They have written and/or published articles that attracted the wrath of the big wigs. Some have used that badge of honor to garner more credibility and popularity.

 
The pioneering websites are: NigerianVillageSquare.com, NigeriamasterWeb.com, NigeriaWorld.com, ElenduReports.com, SaharaReporters.com, NigerianVoice.com, etc. I hope NigeriansInFrance.com and AfricanUndisguised.com are restored soon. Nigerians should regularly visit each of these websites to show support and to keep them in business. Nigerians need more websites to haunt the do-nothing-good politicians.

 
Legendary Fela used his music and fame to fight the power. Likewise, these websites employ their sites as powerful thorns on the side of errant leaders; proving the pen is mightier than the sword. How these people muster enough courage to operate their websites should be studied, commended, and replicated in other aspects of Nigerian society.

 
The websites perform other societal functions. For example, after reading about a woman with serious sickness, a reader contacted the NigeriaWorld operator. He was prompt in tacking down the news reporter to find the sick woman. A Harvard-trained surgeon Dr. Brian Camazine had volunteered to perform the surgery pro-bono and an anonymous reader had agreed to chip in N400,000 the newspaper article sought to treat the woman. Reporters covering such pleas should include adequate contact information, in case a reader has the wherewithal to assist.

 
The websites foster training ground for budding writers. Seasoned authors can use the venues to mentor future writers and to showcase their craft. Hats off to prolific Internet writers, such as Rudolf Okonkwo, Peterside Chamberlain, Nasir El-Rufai, Okey Ndibe, Femi Awodele, Femi Ajayi, and others. One does not have to agree with everything writers publish to appreciate their contributions. We need more authors to write about what we need to know, not just what they think we want to read.

 
My favorite contributors are: Rudolf Okonkwo and Peterside Chamberlain and Nasir El-Rufai. These writers know how to breakdown complex topics so the average reader can understand them. Mr. Okonkwo's pieces are esoterically great; read his articles!. Mallam El-Rufai's articles are often right on; however, the reader needs to know that the Mallam's nursing a political ambition. I miss Mr. Chamberlain's financial articles.

 
Surviving In Biafra by Alfred Uzokwe is a book one of the sites helped popularize. It's a unique book that narrates that vicious civil war via a child's lens. To obtain a copy of the book, either ask your local library to stock it or buy one.

 
It's ironic that some Nigerian websites are censoring contributors. Some of the writers think their work became too thorny that some politicians called in censorship favor. While a few others think there are tribal or regional politics being played beneath the surface. Some websites want exclusive right to articles they publish. Then there are personal fall outs that result in writers being banned. Whatever the reason(s), the duties of these websites are too important to allow them to be attenuated.

 
It's a competitive business but the websites could emulate NigerianVoice and Nigerian Village Square and Sahara Reporters who publish articles without exclusivity requirement. These three sites are progressive and delightful, in deed. Sahara Reporters goes a step further by advertising competing websites. Bravo to NigerianVoice.com! It's a comprehensive website with instant publishing and editing functions.

 
Unfortunately, a few writers have traded their fame for seats at the fleecing table, once the price is right. These people pen critical articles about the government or politicians but as soon as their bread is buttered, they begin to sing a different tune.

 
Website owners have their work cut out for them. While they remain the vanguards of Nigerian fledgling democracy, they should have enough courage to broadcast news from their pipelines without fear or favor! Finally, it's up to the readers to collectively let the leaders know they won't stand for media censorship of any kind. That is the essence of a democratic Nigeria.

 
Chuks U.C. Ukaoma resides in Austin, Texas, USA. Read his other articles on this and Yahoo website. Email: chuksucukaoma@yahoo.com

 
*Photo Caption - Chuks U.C. Ukaoma, Article author

-Masterweb Reports
 

When a balding and greying old man in his 60’s who should be a retired and resting grandfather spends all his time being a cowardly wimp that hides behind his computer to pimp and recycle nothing else but hate and abuse against everything and everyone on the internet then it is obvious that there is a problem somewhere. It makes one to imagine how embarrassed his relations and siblings would be reading the recycled trash from the sick OSUJI.

 
It is not surprising that most websites chased him away from their sites and he found refuge in junk forums that can tolerate the trash that he posts. The same forums he once declared he was quitting only to display his lack of character and confusion by swallowing his vomit and running back because he could find no life outside being a sadist and a psychopath on the internet.

 
Ironically the OZODI OSUJI that wishes others dead is an anti-social coward who for more than 40 years has been lost in America as he has never travelled home and who is too afraid even to mix with people , yet he hides his delusional and cowardly head behind his computer asking that others be killed.

 
Not only those who run naked are mad. OZODI OSUJI is a sick, frustrated, depressed, rejected and tormented soul who is living out the demons of his life on the internet . The only unfortunate thing is that instead of committing suicide to end his shambolic life, the old wreck disturbs innocent people with his demons on the internet. His picture above is the true image of an old, delusional, greying and bald wreck of a man who urgently needs help to free him from the self consuming demons that devours his soul and makes his life a miserable existence.



 
Below are excerpts of OZODI OSUJI’s tirades against Nigerians, Africans, Igbos, Obama, Americans, etc., calling all and every group all kinds of unprintable names which is proof of the man’s insanity.

 
Excerpts of Ozodi Osuji Abusing Nigerians:

 
“Force is necessary to make Nigerians give up their thieving ways and learn to live by the rule of law. (Nigerians are so devious that they have learned to talk about “the rule of law”; they fling that phrase at your face but nevertheless continue in their thieving ways; these people bastardize everything good that comes their way that one cannot afford to listen to the glib utterances of good intentions that come out of their filthy mouths.” -Osuji
 

Nigerians need a period of merciless treatment to make them become decent human beings. As it is, they are worse than predatory animals!” -Osuji

 
“ Do not listen to their glib talk; point guns at their heads and compel them to do things that they ought to be doing and refused to do. If they refuse to do as asked kill them. Their existence is of no use, any way. What is a Nigerian living for, what is he contributing to science and technology or even political discourse other than makes noise?” -Osuji

 
“These people want to live at all costs but living for what they have no clue. They are afraid of death. Fire a gun into their crowd, kill a few of them and the rest of them, like lily livered cowards, run for cover; they run into underground burrows and from there make noise.” -Osuji

 
“Nigerians for too long have been criminals and it will take an equally long time to redirect their behaviors from criminality to law abiding.” -Osuji

 
“I am asserting that Nigerians are peacocks, vain, proud, egoistic, and narcissistic. In effect, I am saying that they are mentally ill.) (What is a Nigerian but a pure egotist, a narcissistic personality! The narcissistic personality disordered person fancies himself special and better than other persons and wants other persons to admire him because he is better than them. Believing in the illusion of his personal superiority he justifies exploiting other people, in his eyes, using inferior persons for his good, and discarding them as pieces of scrap iron when they are no longer useful to him.” -Osuji

 
“If you ever engage in any kind of business activity with Nigerians, instead of working to make the business a success they put their little brains to cheating you, robbing you; they seldom seek positive ways to make things work well. These people get other people to do all the work, and then steal from them! These people’s ingenuity lies in putting their little minds to criminal thinking and activities and seldom in being productive persons. They are crooks of the first order.” -Osuji

 
“It seems appropriate to call Nigerians thieves. Why so? Consider that in the main, their politicians seek public offices: legislative, executive, judiciary and bureaucratic to loot the national treasury. They seek political and bureaucratic offices as opportunity to steal to their hearts satisfaction not because they want to do anything useful for their people. Political offices are seen as avenue from which they become rich and while at it be called very important persons.” –Osuji

 
( Read more at:- http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/articles/ozodi-thomas-osuji/a-case-for-dictatorship-for-nigeria.html and http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/articles/ozodi-thomas-osuji/are-nigerians-crooks-12.html )

 
____________

 
Excerpts of Ozodi Osuji Abusing Igbos:

 
“Yorubas could feel insulted by squatters claiming ownership of their land and attack and kill a few of them and the rest of them would carry their loads on their sorry heads and march to the East. They would not even have the courage to stand and fight to death. When the going gets tough they always run to their tribal enclave.These people routinely insult Hausas and Hausas, not being as patient as Yorubas are, often pick up their machetes and start slashing at any Igbo in sight.” –Osuji

 
“One of the annoying traits of Igbos is their arrogance and lack of political realism. Igbos generally have naïve views of human nature. They put folks down and expect those folks to like them! How naïve can you be! If you put folks down they want to kill you! And make no mistake about it: every human being has the capacity to kill other human beings if he so desires it. I have the capacity to kill you and you have the capacity to kill me. Therefore, I must respect you and you must respect me if both of us want to live together, get along and not harm one another. This existential realism notwithstanding, Igbos insult other people; it is as if they are unaware that those they insult could hate and kill them. They do not seem to have the capacity to learn from their sorry history where those they degraded, Hausas, killed them. They are like insane persons: they keep on engaging in the same behaviors while expecting different results. The fact is that if you insult folks they would not like you and some will not only put obstacles on your path but would occasionally kill you! And you are not invincible despite your childish arrogance; anyone who so chooses it can kill you. You are a human animal who lives in flesh; and like everything in flesh you can be put down; you will die and rot and smell to high heaven.” –Osuji

 
( Read more at:- http://www.nairaland.com/873527/why-igbos-always-go-looking and http://www.chatafrik.com/articles/nigerian-affairs/item/113-why-it-is-unlikely-an-igbo-would-be-elected-the-president-of-nigeria.html?tmpl=component&print=1 )

 
____________

 
Excerpts of Ozodi Osuji Abusing Africans:

 
“In my view, the African is an emotionally retarded creature; he is unable to love and work for his fellow human beings.” –Osuji

 
“If Satan is an actual entity, not mere figment of our imagination, I would not hesitate calling Africans the children of Satan. I have never seen a more devilish people in my entire life!” –Osuji

 
( Read more at:- http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=17862&Itemid=46 )

 
____________

 
Excerpts of Ozodi Osuji Abusing Obama:

 
“I have visceral hatred of Barrack Obama; I have tried to accommodate him but the fact is that I simply do not like the man." -Osuji

 
"I have wondered why I cannot stand this Obama person. Now I get it. He makes complicated that which is very simple. He comes across as a college professor who in an effort to seem knows it all talks loquaciously and volubly about a matter that can be talked about in simple and understandable prose, and like a college professor he comes across as not knowing what the hell he is talking about.” -Osuji

 
( Read more at:-http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/articles/ozodi-thomas-osuji/why-i-do-not-like-barrack-obama.html )

 
____________

 
Excerpts of Ozodi Osuji’s Hate Writings On America Where He Lives:

 
“Empirical observation indicates that white Americans are mostly sociopaths, antisocial personalities and criminals. They enslaved and killed other people just so that they kept their useless lives in existence. They killed Indians and stole their lands and enslaved Africans and do not exhibit the slightest sense of remorse or guilt from these hurtful behaviors; indeed, they seemed to have enjoyed doing so, classic symptoms of sociopathy.” –Osuji

 
“I predict that before the end of this century, when a significant percent of the people no longer desire to live at all costs and, therefore, no longer fear death, that the evil empire called America will decline. The criminal empire can only exist for as long as people desire to live as separated egos and fear death and want to buy time for as long as they could.” –Osuji

 
“‘What is America but hell on earth? America is a country where folks decide not to live on the basis of love but on the bases of criminality. They can only tolerate their useless existence by taking drugs to deaden their conscience. They are mostly addicted to drugs for drugs enable them to tolerate their criminal behaviors. These people cannot intimidate one; one should pity them rather than fear them.” –Osuji

 
( Read more at:- http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/articles/ozodi-thomas-osuji/on-americas-racism-15.html )

 
____________

 
Lawrence Nwobu (lawrencenwobu@yahoo.com )

 
*Note: Ozodi Osuji's listed contact info are as follows: Emails: ozodiosuji@yahoo.ca or Ozodi@africainstituteseattle.org Phone +1 206-853-4245

 
*Photo Caption – Ozodi Osuji

-Masterweb Reports
 

The recent clamor for subsidy thieves to be prosecuted is as illusionary as hoping that Lucifer will betray the Queen of the Coast. I have reiterated in an earlier piece, 'Shut Up! Nigerian Government Cannot Prosecute Subsidy Thieves' that those who hoped that subsidy thieves will be prosecuted will be disappointed at the crash of their optimism. Recent events have shown that successfully prosecuting those who stole N1.7 trillion naira that belongs to the Nigerian people under a fraudulent subsidy regime as revealed by the Farouk Lawan led Subsidy Probe Committee of the House of Representative reports and the recent Aigboje Aig-Imoukhede Presidential Review Committee is a mirage and can never happen.
 
 
The CBN was first contracted to rubbish the report, later the NNPC joined fray. Their attempts to discredit the subsidy probe report failed to impress both the Nigerian people and the Nigerian media. They changed tactics; the Attorney General of the Federation came with his own version of the understanding of the report and was short of calling it an ill prepared document which needs proper reconstruction. Nigerians ignored him and continued with calls for the prosecution of oil thieves. The Lawan $3 million dollars bribery scandal came and Nigerians refused to be distracted from the substance of the matter. Now the government has directed the EFCC to investigate the reports and prosecute offenders. That is where the matter will finally die due to imbecile prosecution.
 
 
The EFCC have buried different cases of corruption due to inconclusive investigations or haphazard prosecutions. In some cases there is deliberate collusion between the EFCC, the suspects and the Judiciary to encumber the cases so that nothing will come out of it. What happened in the Erastus Akingbola case where the Judge dismissed the suit for incompetent prosecution is a case at hand.
 
 
The only achievement of the subsidy probe is information. This information will be vindictively handy in the day of revolution or reckoning when the Nigerian people will reclaim their commonwealth from the hands of thieving leadership. The second gain is that the thieves will reduce their tempo and this reduced tempo will save the nation billions of dollars of hitherto stolen funds.
 
 
The expectation that Goodluck Jonathan will prosecute the fingers that fed his presidential election is wishful thinking. During Obasanjo era, the former president refused to surrender Babangida for prosecution. The Dr Pius Okigbo Committee report on the squandering of $12 billion dollar gulf oil windfall disappeared from all public records during the tenure of Olusegun Obasanjo. All attempts by the Nigerian people to pressurize Obasanjo to prosecute the Babangida fell on deaf ears because the later was the leader of the people who dragged Obasanjo into the State House in 1999.
 
 
Umaru Yaradua was not able to surrender James Ibori for trial. He frustrated all earlier attempts by the Metropolitan Police to arraign James Ibori for money laundering charges. He sent a high powered letter and delegation from Aoondoaka, then Attorney General and Minister for Justice of Nigeria to convince the British police that Ibori was a clean man. Ibori had used Delta State funds to bankroll his presidency with the permutations that Goodluck Jonathan will be dropped as Vice President after Yaradua’s first tenure.
 
 
There is yet no record in Nigeria where a political godson led the arraignment of the godfather for corruption related matters. Godsons and godfathers quarrel in Nigeria over control of state resources but their disagreement has never degenerated to the extent of the godson and incumbent dragging his benefactor to the courts for fraud related matters. It is a no go area for Nigerian politicians. Goodluck Jonathan cannot be an exception. He cannot be different from the tradition that trumped him up.
 
 
Goodluck Jonathan would still have won the 2011 presidential elections without the assistance of the huge funds deployed at the time. The hawks convinced him that without a huge financial chest, his presidential dream is finished, and such reasoning commenced the process of the looting of national treasury unprecedented in the history of Nigeria. Therefore, the people who used different guise to mobilize those funds cannot be victimized through fraud related prosecutions. Funds were mobilized from Fuel Subsidy bills, Pensions, Capital Market, Customs, Federal Inland Revenue, Ministries, Departments and Parastatals of Government. The fronts refused to surrender the privilege even after the elections had been concluded. The presidency preferred to confront the masses by removal of fuel subsidy than face the blood sucking oil mafia.
 
 
The earlier this government runs affairs by telling the truth, the better for all. The opposition Action Congress of Nigeria had earlier called on President Jonathan to apologize to Nigerians over the subsidy scandal. This is the best he can do under the circumstances. Let him apologize to Nigerians for allowing his party men and their friend’s costly indulgence in endless sharing of subsidy national cake and promise to block all loopholes whereby such thievery will occur in the future. Nigerians will likely appreciate an admittance of wrongdoing and a verifiable evidence of preventing future occurrence than the current circus show.
 
 
The politics of N1.7 trillion naira subsidy thefts is a time bomb which will likely explode on the thieving politicians and their business associates in the not too distant future. Equally, the possibility of Goodluck Jonathan betraying his helpers is rare and such optimism is an expensive mental exercise. This cartel is so oiled and powerful that crumbling the Jonathan administration will take them a few weeks and for a president already frightened by Boko Haram Jihadists, he cannot afford another battle with the oil thieves.
 
 
Obinna Akukwe

-Masterweb Reports
 
This is not about Charles Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities but about two states that grew from the same source. Delta and Edo States were formerly Bendel State. Before then it was Midwest State. Midwest State was so named on May 27, 1967 when Gowon created twelve states. It was the only region that was not split in that 1967 state creation exercise. In 1963, Midwest Region was created. It remains to date the only constitutionally created state in Nigeria. It was not created via any military fiat.

 
As Midwest State, the state became the pacesetter in Nigeria. The state became synonymous with development. In infrastructure, sports and other areas, the state became number one in the country. When it metamorphosed to Bendel State, the pace never slowed.

 
When twenty one years ago, Bendel State gave birth to Delta and Edo States one had expected the two states to maintain the pace. The relationship between these two states goes even beyond the 1963 creation of Midwest Region. Nearly all ethnic groups in the two states trace their origin to Bini. The language spoken by nearly all the ethnic groups in both states can be traceable too to Bini language. In folk tales too, most of the stories are about the Obas of Benin Empire.

 
Politically too, both states have been moving in the same direction. In the second republic, Bendel state joined the progressives in the West by voting in a Unity Party of Nigeria (UPN) governorship candidate. In 1983, Bendel State went to National Party of Nigeria (NPN).

 
During Babangida’s contraption and democratic experiment, both states went to the Social Democratic Party (SDP). Both states have been moving in the same ideological direction way back in time.

 
In 1999, both states went to the People’s Democratic Party (PDP). In both states for a long period of time, they were condemned to bad leadership and corruption. For ten years, Edo state was in bondage. Development was lacking. There was infrastructural decay. Insecurity became the order of the day. The godfathers were busy helping themselves to state fund. It was ten years of disaster in Edo state. No wonder, the former governor was found guilty of corruption.

 
The case was not different in Delta State. Since 1999, the state has been retrogressing. Roads are in terrible conditions. From Effurun Roundabout to Enerhen Junction, from Enerhen Road to Udu, Refinery Road, there is none to write home about. Asaba is not faring better either. Apart from the new bridge construction going on, Agbor is a forgotten place. Where roads are constructed, it is of very poor quality. Maryam Babangida Way in Asaba is a typical example.

 
The Health is not left out in this rot going on in Delta State. Asaba General Hospital is an eyesore. If the hospital in the state capital is this bad, one can imagine what obtains in the rural areas.

 
Corruption has eaten deep into the system. Delta State awards the most expensive projects in the country and in most cases, the projects are never completed. Oghara power project has not left the drawing board several years after it was awarded and paid for. Asaba Airport has become a drain on the state’s purse. The Airport has gulped several billions of naira and is yet to be completed. N7.4billion was the contract sum for the demolition of hills at the airport. It was meant to be done in ten days. Over two months later, the job has not been completed.

 
Elections in Delta State have been the worst in the country. Results are known even before elections. Thanks to the judiciary, such results are made to stand. Since 1999, those in power have been able to win elections but have not been able to win the hearts of the people.

 
Like Edo State, the former governor of Delta State has been convicted of money laundering charges. It was ten years of bad governance and corruption in Edo State while Delta State has been thirteen years of corruption and bad governance with no end in sight.

 
In 2007, the people of Edo State had had enough. They decided to vote against underdevelopment, corruption and bad governance. Though the mandate was stolen, they were resolute and unbowed. Comrade Oshiomole provided the needed leadership - a quality that has been lacking in Delta State opposition. Almost two years after, Edo people reclaimed their mandate. Since then, Edo State has been on the roller coaster of one success story to the other. The people have never had it so good. While Edo State is on the ascendancy of development, Delta State has been on the ascendancy of corruption.

 
Two weeks ago, Edo people reaffirmed their faith in Comrade Oshiomole by massively voting for him and politically burying the forces of darkness in the state. They defended their votes. They ensured that their votes counted. In spite of some logistic problems in some areas and inclement weather in other areas, the people were never discouraged. They did not want the forces of darkness to eclipse the sun already shinning in the state. Their leader, the Comrade Governor never disappointed them as a leader. He was there with them. The small man with a big heart was like a god to Edo people. He never for once abandoned them. Today, any Deltan that passes through Edo State will be ashamed of his state. With a very small budget Comrade Oshiomole has been able to do what Delta State could not do with its massive budget.

 
Edo and Delta State are twins. Both states have been moving in one ideological direction until recently. Today, Edo State has overtaken Delta State. While Edo State is a reference point of good governance, Delta State has become a reference point of bad governance and corruption. Delta State must move in the right direction.

 
In a Press Statement issued by Delta Rescue Mission (DRM), immediately after the announcement of the Edo Election results, the group has this to say:

 
“The Edo State election is a source of good lesson for the people of Delta State. Since the advent of this democratic dispensation, Delta State has never had it so bad. Some politicians impose themselves through the blessing of the judiciary on the people. Delta State has suffered enough. Seeing the developmental strides in Edo State, one is ashamed to note that Delta State has more resources with little to show for it.

 
No non performing individual or political party can impose itself on the voters if they are determined and focused. This is the lesson from Edo State. It is the will of the people that determines change in democracy. Unlike the bullet in a military era, it is the ballot that becomes the people's potency against the wicked who want to rule by all means. When people are tired of darkness, their appetite for light cannot be silenced anymore. Deltans, let us move towards the light.

 
We were once the Midwest and then Bendel. It is wise to move westwards into the club of focused, visionary and development driven governors. We can do it. Delta Rescue Mission has flagged it off, join us. The time to prepare for that change is now.”

 
I cannot agree more with this statement. Deltans, let us begin to mobilize the people now. Power belongs to the people and not riggers of elections. We must take a cue from Edo State and make our votes count.

 
Eddy Aghanenu
Delta Rescue Mission

-Masterweb Reports
 
The Government of Anambra State has viewed with concern, the unwholesome acts of some miscreants in various parts of the State who engage in the negative conduct of obstructing, disturbing, impeding and generally preventing the needed development and improvement on land throughout the State.

 
Government also notes that the rascalities of these deviant groups, who operate under one name or the other, have had the undesirable effect of disrupting the activities of genuineinvestors and developers who wish to invest in the State.

 
We now have a law that takes care of this ugly situation. The law prohibits and makes criminal, certain conducts relating to land, some of which are:

 
- Any person selling land not belonging to him, to another person.

 
Any person selling the same parcel of land to two or more different persons.

 
- Any person demanding or collecting any fee not approved by law from any person developing or improving an already existing property in the State.

 
- Any person willfully damaging, destroying, pulling down or removing any beacon or structure on any land belonging to another person.

 
- Any person harassing, obstructing or assaulting any worker in a construction site with the intent to compel the worker or owner of the land to pay an illegal fee.
 

 
 
 
The penalties for these offences as provided by the law, range from four to ten years imprisonment or appropriate fine.
 
Enforcement Committees which will see to the strict implementation of this law are now being set up in all the Local Government Areas of the State.

 
Let me use this occasion to warn all those who have hitherto involved or engaged themselves in the activities which are now criminalized by the Prohibition of Fraudulent Practices on Land and Property Law, to henceforth desist from or put a stop to such unwholesome acts. Such persons, especially the youths, are advised to find other lawful and productive activities to engage in. It is the desire and determination of this Government to ensure and sustain a conducive and peaceful environment for all those engaged in lawful enterprise in this State.

 
Finally, the good people of the State will recall that at the early part of this Government, I had cause to proscribe some organizations in the effort to get rid of dangerous and undesirable elements so as to sanitize the State.

 
Presently, some more groups have emerged with similar negative activities which are inimical to the interest of the State. In this administration’s determination to rid the State of all such undesirable groups and persons who hinder the lawful enterprise of our people, I have today, pursuant to my powers under Section 98(2) of the Criminal Code, Laws of Anambra State, 1991, proscribed some organizations or groups whose activities are deemed dangerous to the good government of the State by declaring them as unlawful societies in Anambra State. Those affected are:

 
(a) Mpiawa-azu group (or by whatever name called);
 
(b) Igbo Youths Organization (or by whatever name called);
 
(c) Ogbaru Youths Organization (or by whatever name called); and
 
(d) All other Local Government Areas Youth Organizations in the State.

 
 
 
 
The legal implication of this Order is that it is now a criminal offence for any person to belong to, associate with, manage or assist in the management of any of the concerned groups or organizations. All Community based youth organizations must be registered with, supervised by, controlled and subjected tothe town union and traditional ruler of that community which must take responsibility for the activities or conducts of their youth organizations. This Government is determined and will continue to strive in its constitutional duty to maintain law and order in Anambra State.
 

 
 
 
Thank you all and may God bless you