Translational inhibition due to CHEAP RETIN-A the fact that the path of the excitation occurs Br neuron. recurrent inhibition     Carried intercalary brake cells (Renshaw). Axons of buy nolvadex online canada motor neurons often give collaterals (branches), ending with Renshaw cells. Renshaw cell axons terminate on the body or dendrites of the motor neuron, forming inhibitory synapses. Arousal that occurs in motor neurons travel in a straight path to the skeletal muscle, as well as collaterals to inhibitory neurons, which send impulses to motoneurons and inhibits them. The stronger the motor neuron excitation, the more excited Renshaw cells and the more intense they exert their inhibitory effect, which protects nerve cells from overstimulation. lateral inhibition    
 

-Masterweb Reports

MEMORANDUM FROM OHANAEZE NDIGBO - On Behalf of The Igbo-Speaking People of Nigeria. BACKGROUND - For our country, with its colonial stamp of 'made in England', the three hundred odd ethnic and sub-ethnic units in this land, brought together by the force of British Imperialism to forge a modern nation, have good cause to thank God for the astonishing abundance of human and material resources bestowed on us. We are still in the process of nation building, struggling to blend together and harmonize our various very rich but differing traditions, customs and cultures. The recognition of the significance of ......Click For Complete Ohanaeze Draft Submission

-Masterweb Reports
 

Anambra State University Teaching Hospital yesterday received 13 medical students, being its first batch of trainees for clinical training from the Anambra State University’s Faculty of Medicine in Uli.

 
The induction of the students was sequel to the recent accreditation of the newly constructed teaching hospital by the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria and the National University Commission, which cleared it to start clinical training of medical doctors as well as run a medical school after inspection of its facilities.

 
The students who were 13 in number were said to be those who scaled through their second MB examination out of about 86 that started with the university’s faculty of Medicine. Their induction commences a three-year journey that will see them through their third, fourth and fifth MB examinations to qualify as medical doctors.

 
Speaking to the students after they have been officially inducted, the institution’s provost of college of medicine, Prof Frank Akpuaka admonished the students to ensure that they comply with laid down rules, while commending them for their steadfastness.

 
Akpuaka who announced to the students that they will be coming to lectures from Holy Family village, Amansea where they will be camped explained that the measure is to keep the students in a quiet environment where they can concentrate on their studies as their practice will deal with lives on graduation and required hard work.

 
Prof Amobi Ilika, immediate past commissioner for health in Anambra state told journalists that the induction is very significant in Anambra State as it marks the beginning of the manifestations of some of the achievement of the Mr Peter Obi-led government.

 
Speaking after the induction ceremony, the leader of the students, Mr Onyebuchi Izumba told journalists that they are particularly grateful to the state governor for completing and accrediting the teaching Hospital for their training unlike past students who have had to be sent to facilities in other states.

 
*Photo Caption - First set of students of Anambra State Teaching Hospital during their induction at the Newly accredited College of Medicine and Anambra State Teaching Hospital, Awka.

-Masterweb Reports
 

Individuals of Charisma are often sincerely called to mind, eulogized, remembered and or immortalized while still alive for their colossal humanitarian disposition not only to the poor, the less privileged, the unemployed but also to persons who genuinely needed to be helped given the availability of resources at the givers disposal and prompting of the donor’s spirit. Conversely too, people often times are snubbed into eternal obscurity, oblivion for their actions and inactions which most people consider to be negative and not in the interest of the downtrodden, unemployed, less privileged among others whose situation appear to be insurmountable. It is therefore in the former that Prince Tonye Princewill falls.

 
Born on 4th of January, 1969, into the family of a famous academics and Amanyanabo of the Kalabari Kingdom - King Prof TJT Princewill, Amachree the xi. Princewill an Engineer by training possesses a post-graduate degree from the Imperial College, London. A proficient practitioner with a unblemished working knowledge of both ITIL and Change Management, he’s been a presenter on project management issues. His knowledge of the Oil and Gas industry, his ICT experience and his relationships with both corporate and community players has led to his instituting and facilitation of several initiatives for training, capacity building and skills acquisition in the region.

 
Princewill a perspicacious business magnate with interests cutting across the aviation industry to haulage of petroleum products, entertainment industry, information communication technology to mention but a few had his initial stints with blue Chip companies where he polished his professional skills which he used to good advantage. He is the youngest member of the Rivers State Economic Advisory Committee. In December 2007, he was appointed Investment Consultant to the Rivers State and has so far been able to attract over (N50B) fifty Billion Naira) worth of investments to the state through the Public Private Partnership Initiative of the State Government.

 
In his bid to bring in foreign investment to Rivers State, through Public Private Partnership, he pulled the maiden string that saw Silver bird Cinema in the heart of Port Harcourt. Apart from this, he has facilitated other major investment opportunities and ventures for the State Government's Public Private Partnership (PPP) Initiative to wit, the new International Market in Eleme, the new Rivers State Emergency Call Centre, the 1000 bed Mega Hospital, the Mother and Children's Hospital and the Tumosan's tractor assembly plant. These initiatives alongside his personal business concerns such as River Drill Group and Delta Plus have played a major role in Rivers State as avenues for the employment of thousands of unemployed persons.

 
On how Prince Tonye Princewill impacted on the lives of the youth, undergraduate and postgraduate one Onukwube Uwanu, a social critic wrote “In an unemployment ravaging society and being an employment agent, Princewill has been able to employ thousands of youths and graduates through his investment initiatives which cut across oil and gas, telecommunication, information technology etc. These youths would have been unemployed, indolent or at worse social misfits but God forbid. Not done yet, Princewill is the brain behind his father’s Pet Project and Scholarship Scheme where over 150 Kalabari undergraduates and post-graduates around the globe benefit from the scholarship programme yearly. In addition, he has not relented in giving alms to the less privileged individuals, groups or organization either morally, financially or otherwise. One of such assistance was the donation of a bus to the National Association of Ijaw Female Students (NAIFS), an umbrella body of Ijaw female students both in Nigeria and Diaspora”.

 
As a sports lover, he on the 26th of July, 2008 sponsored twenty youths and six journalists to the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja to watch live the match between two giant English clubs - Manchester United and Portsmouth. Twenty fans were selected out of five thousand fans through a draw, ten females and the other ten males of Niger Delta extraction. For the two days they spent in Abuja, hotel accommodation, daily allowance and feeding as well as transportation was adequately provided by this rare gift to the Niger Delta and by extension Nigeria. The reason for the gesture according to a close source was not only to enable the fans to have first-hand experience of Abuja but to also watch live, for the first time, the two clubs play and to eventually propel them to make a career in sports if need be.

 
He had in the past and even recently identified with the media from 2009 to date which has earned him the tag “friend of the media” as his relationship with the Forth Estate could best be described as amiable and convivial. It is worthy of note that the Rivers State owned newspaper, The Tide Newspaper has benefited from the magnanimous inclinations of this scion of the Kalabari monarch. This is sequel to his donation of three quality laptops to the newspaper outfit in 2009 and donation of a world class photocopier to the Rivers State chapter of Nigeria Union of Journalists’ Correspondents Chapel. Recently too, he made an undisclosed cash donation to the incoming executive and a large collection of equipment to the Correspondents Chapel to help assist them with running their business centre in addition to the donation of Media Centre to the Peoples Democratic Party Head Quarters in Abuja, a party which he belongs to.

 
Not done yet, he has facilitated the sponsorship of the like of Mr. Valentine Ohu in Broadcast Journalism, Miss Crystabel Goddy in Acting, Mr Telema Senibo in 3D Graphics, Miss Mercy Akudo, in Acting, and Mr Stanley Kotey in 3D Graphics to the 2011 Del-York Film Academy. For posterity sake, the above youths are currently owners of studios worth millions of Naira which will help them put into practice the training the obtained at Del-York Film Academy. Similarly he had in more than one occasion identified with orphanages by the sponsorship of NNENDA, a Nigerian home video that x-rayed the pitiable plight of orphans in the society and recently the musical reality T show for orphanages organized by Melody Shelters, wherein he in collaboration with Adonis Productions dulled out the Championship Prize of N10M to Kogi State Godswill Orphanage while the Runners-up, the Lifetime Orphanage of Rivers State got the Prize of N5M. Rachael Homes, Abuja came in third carting home the N3Mprize while five hundred thousand each was given to the other remaining five Homes.

 
In appreciation for the humanitarian contributions of this rare breed (Prince Tonye Princewill) in the political enclave of the South-South Zone, one Odimegwu Onwumere dedicated an anthology with the title: “Piquant: Love Poems To Prince Tonye Princewill” to him. Again, though not given to accepting awards, Prince Tonye made himself available to accept a “Leadership and Human Development Award conferred on him by the National Association of Ijaw Female Students.

 
These commendable humanitarian works embarked upon by Prince Tonye Princewill, among others not captured herein, have continued to generate reactions among many who ask if there is no end to his philanthropy and for what purpose. It is now over to you, the Prince of Niger Delta politics to expatiate to Nigerians what informed your charitable works.

 
Nwaorgu Faustinus

 
*Photo Caption – Rev. Jesse Jackson (Left), Prince Tonye Princewill (Right).

-Masterweb Reports
 

The Amnesty Programme, introduced by the late President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua, in more ways than one thawed the ice of tension in the oil-rich region of Nigeria. However, it remains a prelude to a comprehensive resolution of the Niger Delta problem, which is lack of development. So, the bottom-line is getting all stakeholders to join in the efforts to rapidly and significantly transform the oil-bearing communities.

 
The way forward, therefore, is to sustain the gains of the amnesty programme by embarking on tangible development projects that would positively change the lives of the people. That would also enlist them as vanguards for the protection of oil installations and vulnerable pipelines crisscrossing the Niger Delta. Even now, the oil industry is being threatened by the activities of criminals who seem to have taken over from where the militants left off.

 
According to Engineer Austen Oniwon, the Group Managing Director of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), thieves are stealing about 180,000 barrels worth of crude oil every day from pipelines and through illegal bunkering in the Niger Delta. So, as it is, high-profile criminals have taken over illegal oil trading activities from militants who hitherto engaged in such acts.

 
Counting the cost in monetary terms, Mr. Mutiu Sunmonu, the Managing Director, Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Limited, said that the country is losing $5bn (N780bn) annually to the oil thieves.

 
Thanks to the amnesty programme, the oil thieves can now be distinguished from the militants, who were genuinely agitating for a fair deal from the Federal Government. This is why no effort should be spared in ensuring that the fruits of the official pardon are fully enjoyed by the people who bear the brunt of oil exploration and exploitation.

 
In order to make things happen as quickly as expected, the development agencies, such as the oil companies, the federal, state, local governments, the Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs and the Niger Delta Development Commission, NDDC, must collaborate at different levels and key into the regional development Master Plan already approved by the central government. The NDDC which facilitated the production of the Niger Delta Regional Development Master Plan is well placed to drive the process of its implementation. So far, the commission has been making efforts to build enduring partnerships and embarking on targeted engagements with strategic stakeholders.

 
Recently, the Presidential Monitoring Committee on NDDC held an interactive session with stakeholders in the region where it was agreed that the commission would focus more on completing all on-going projects awarded since its inception. The commission has commenced an audit of ongoing projects across the region to enable it identify the status of such projects in order to prioritize their completion based on available resources. Dr Christian Oboh, the Managing Director of the NDDC, said the commission had reviewed its budgetary system to put all existing projects on the top priority list. “A lot of projects have been awarded since the establishment of the NDDC; we intend to focus on the completion of the projects. Partnership is the new road map that the commission has adopted in project implementation across the states of the Niger Delta”, he said.

 
Dr. Oboh said that with the re-activation of the Advisory Committee of the NDDC, which comprises the governors of oil-bearing states and the principal officers of the commission, it would now be easier for them to interface directly on project planning and implementation. This is the driving force behind the joint effort of the NDDC, Akwa Ibom State Government and Mobil Producing Nigeria Ltd in the quest to complete the Eket-Ibeno Road. The 18 kilometre dual carriage way, with two bridges, is being constructed at the cost of N8.2 billion.

 
Obviously, pleased by the team effort, the Akwa Ibom State Governor, Godswill Akpabio eagerly joined the chief executive officers of NDDC and Mobil to inspect the road project to work out the best way to deliver it on schedule. The governor said that the road was strategic to the operations of Mobil and as such was very important to the state.

 
He was confident that the NDDC, having teamed up with the state government and Mobil, would deliver quality projects. “With the interaction we have had, there is hope for the Niger Delta. The MD of NDDC has shown focus, passion and commitment. For me, this is a turning point”, he said.

 
Such high profile partnership is the way forward for a region that is yearning for rapid development. The NDDC had always joined forces with key stakeholders in confronting the enormous challenge of making a difference in the lives of the people in the remote communities of the Niger Delta. One of such collaborations is in the construction of the 29 kilometre Ogbia-Nembe road, which it is undertaking in partnership with the Shell Petroleum Development Company [SPDC].

 
The N9.6 billion project illustrates the kind of challenges confronting the Niger Delta. It cuts through the swamps with ten bridges and 99 culverts. The terrain is such that four metres of clay soil has to be dug out and then sand-filled to provide a base for the road. It shouldn’t surprise anyone therefore to learn that constructing a road in this tough environment costs twice or thrice of what is required in other parts of the country. This is a project several previous administrations thought was impossible. Now work on the road is progressing appreciably.

 
This is just one of the many mega projects being executed by the interventionist agency with the limited funds at its disposal. Without doubt, the NDDC needs to be adequately funded to enable it deliver on its mandate. All the key stakeholders, which include the Niger Delta Ministry, three tiers of government and the oil companies, have a responsibility to collaborate with the NDDC as the agency driving the implementation of the Regional Development Master Plan.

 
The master plan, which has been generally applauded as a worthy compass for the development of the region, needs to be adequately funded and meticulously implemented in order to translate the lofty plans into tangible projects and programmes. The big ticket projects articulated in the plan require enormous resources to execute.

 
Unfortunately, the Federal Government which is supposed to lead the way in ensuring adequate funding for the commission for many years under the Olusegun Obasanjo administration failed to meet the statutory obligations to the commission. For many years, the interventionist agency was getting only 10 per cent from it instead of the statutory 15 per cent. This resulted in the much-talked about N500 billion debt that the Federal Government is owing the commission.

 
The NDDC Act states clearly how the commission shall be funded. Section 14[2] provides that “there shall be paid and credited to the fund established pursuant to subsection [1] of this section; [a] from the Federal Government the equivalent of 15 per cent of the total monthly allocation due to the member states of the commission from the federation account, this being the contribution of the Federal Government to the commission; [b] three per cent of the total annual budget of any oil-producing company operating onshore and offshore in the Niger Delta area, including gas processing companies; [c] 50 per cent of monies due to member states of the commission from the ecological fund...” and other sources such as grants and loans.

 
Apart from the Federal Government which did not comply with the provisions of the Act during the Obasanjo years, some of the oil companies have also not been paying the three per cent of their annual budget as required by law. Records show that they deduct first charges before calculating the three per cent from the balance. It is more like cutting the nose to spite the face, given that what they spend for the development of the Niger Delta is for their own good at the end of the day.

 
Given the enormous impact of their activities on the environment, the oil companies are expected to be at the forefront in the critical task of remediating, and indeed the comprehensive development of the oil basin that has suffered so much neglect in the past. It is, in fact, in their interest to develop the region where they operate in order to guarantee peace, which is very necessary for them to continue with their business.

 
Recently, the Petroleum Resources Minister, Mrs Diezani Alison-Madueke, blamed International Oil Companies (IOCs) for the underdevelopment of Nigeria's economy. She said that some decisions taken by the oil firms had resulted in a loss of over $300 billion to government coffers. The minister alleged various acts by foreign oil firms that showed intent to “generate their own revenue without paying attention to actions that add value to the over all Nigerian economy.”

 
The oil companies should embrace global best practices in the execution of their business in the Niger Delta. Ultimately, this will enhance their profile and expedite the development process of our country.

 
Ifeatu Agbu

-Masterweb Reports
 
Work is to commence immediately on the reconstruction of collapsed parts of UNIZIK temporary site axis of the Onitsha-Enugu Expressway. Governor Peter Obi announced this after inspecting the area. Governor Obi said it was unacceptable that a major access road in the heart of the capital city should be in such a deplorable condition and continue to pose daily difficulties to road users.
 

He recalled that his administration has written severally and made repeated representation to the federal government requesting authorization for the State government to reconstruct the Amensea to Amawbia sections of the road as it is in a position to fund and complete the project as early as possible.

 
The Governor regretted that drainages in the area are completely silted because the residents have continued to block them with refuse thereby forcing flood on the roads and orchestrating the devastation of erosion.

 
He made clear that he will personally supervise the opening of the drains and removal of all illegal structures obstructing the free flow of water.

-Masterweb Reports (Submission By Osita Ebiem)
 

At this stage in their collective history it will be very naïve of any Igbo politician of repute, business investor or elite of any shade not to have thought seriously about the anticipated and inevitable breakup of the Nigerian union. The mark of the good politician or leader in any field is being foresighted. The Igbo leader is not only the one that thinks and acts in the interest of the collective, they are able to predict future events and believe in their predictions enough by making concrete efforts to prepare and position themselves, the institution and people they represent to benefit or at the least, not lose as much as they would have when the event eventually occurs. It is always better to be prepared and the event never happens than to be caught unprepared or even under-prepared. The Igbo leader is the one who is able to think of those things that may never happen like they would. Every Igbo leader or any Igbo at all alive today is supposed to have simulated every aspect of what will happen to them and their people after the disintegration of Nigeria. True Igbo leadership is all about responsibility to the people you lead; thinking and planning ahead for them and actually conducting your activities like you mean what you say or think.

 
Let’s look at the above position in the light of the Biafra War. In the history books and the accounts of witnesses it is well known that the Nigerian state was the aggressor in the war. Nigeria with the help of Great Britain, USSR and the Arab nations combined forces and fought dirty to defeat Biafra in 1970. With that said it is true that Biafra lost the War because of the formidable forces that allied themselves against the new nation. Yet, as it is with other complex things in life, if we looked close enough we will see other reasons why Biafrans failed in their justified first attempt at Self Determination and independence. As we go on we will find an uncomfortable lapse on the side of Igbo leaders. We will see that the War was lost not as a result of lack of courage or necessarily because of the seemingly insurmountable odds against Biafra. Biafrans had all the courage they needed because someone said that Biafrans did not just fight hard and well as heroes, he said that heroes fight like Biafrans. Biafrans so demonstrated courage and bravery against odds that today people equate Biafra with, apart from Freedom and Human Dignity; Heroism!

 



Over the years Biafra has become synonymous with those who do heroic things. Today it is believed that whoever that is a Biafran is a hero and does things that befit heroes. But fighting and defending oneself and others as heroes do might sound impressive to some, especially when a vulnerable people come under the threat of total extermination. But when we consider it by a different standard we may be surprised to see that there may not be much in it to be proud of after all. Life force is among the most powerful forces in existence. In summer time, I have seen green grasses grow almost lush in cracks in the middle of busy roads where ten thousand vehicles run on every day. That is an excellent example of the power of the will to survive that is inherent in living things. For grass existence, to endure such harsh and impossible conditions and still survive and maybe thrive is commendable. But here we are talking about human beings with higher intellects than mere grasses. Nature endowed humans with the power of the intellect that enables them to not just exist but determine their existence. Humans have the capacity to, through the power of their mind, determine the quality of their existence here on Earth. This explains the saying; to whom much is given, much is expected.

 

For Igbo/Biafrans, it is not enough to fight and defend their right to life; they are expected to do more than that. When in the 1980s Nigerian Muslims recommenced the Islamic jihad on the Igbo in Kano and other cities in the North of Nigeria under the name Maitatsine; a variant of today’s Boko Haram, the Igbo after overcoming the initial shock of surprise attack, rose up and defended themselves. The Nigerian government just like today could not defend them. There were Igbo businessmen that had shops in the city that sold guns. They took a quick decision and emptied their stores by distributing the guns to fellow Igbo in Sabon Gari, Kano. Their attackers backed down when their Islamic beheading knives and daggers were matched with Igbo guns and ammunition. We can go on and list other such heroic moments when the Igbo came together and fought as one against a common enemy. Yet, as commendable as the action of self-defense is, for the Igbo to not just survive but become secure and prosperous, they must take it a step further from that basic level. They must shift their attention from fighting survival battles, and learn to come together and fight future battles before they begin.

 

All progressive societies around the world at one point in their history confronted this truth and recognized its significance to their success. There is no nation or a group of people that has made any significant progress by remaining at the level of the reactionary. The Igbo nation of today must come to the realization that if she must live successfully in this world, then she must learn to take the initiative in all areas of human endeavors. Igbo people must become offensive and take the fight to the enemy territory rather than lead a carefree existence and only fight back when attacked. The Igbo of this generation must position their nation to begin to take advantage of the works of past generations. Again that is the hallmark of all progressive societies; the ability to stand on the shoulders of past generations rather than let each new generation start from the scratch. It is only lower animals and plants that start afresh at every new season. Even then they have the advantage of their natural instinct and self-adjusting genetic coding capability to compensate for what they lost in their lack of the ability to process complex information and stimuli and make adjustments ahead of events.

 

From available evidences Igbo leaders, politicians and intellectuals failed to fight the Biafra War ten, twenty years before it began. Such lapses on the side of the people in responsible positions in Igbo/Biafra Land are unacceptable and must never happen again. Contrary to Igbo people’s attitude about the country, the others in Nigeria never hid their negative feelings and intentions against the Igbo long before the 1966 Igbo pogrom/genocide that led up to the 1967 to 1970 war. For any careful observer it was not difficult to see how the Hausa, Fulani, Yoruba and others fought their own side of the war long before it began. They won the War not necessarily because of the combined forces of Britain, Soviet Union, Egypt and the Arab League of Nations. (Readers who care to pursue this point further are encouraged to listen to and read what the Ahmadu Bellos and others of Nigeria had to say about Igbo people ten, twenty years before the War). The present generation of Igbo people cannot afford to allow the repeat of that pre-War mistake. The leaders must learn to think and plan ahead while calling the bluff of the frowning faces of demagogues who flaunt before them the catch phrases; “you want to break up the country,” “you want to be rebels”. Igbo leaders, politicians and intellectuals must stop falling victims of the trap of wanting to please these Nigerian browbeaters by recoiling and apologizing for their very existence. They must stop being content with just living for the moment and “safe” so that no one accuses them of “trying to break up the country”. Nigeria should have broken up long before now, anyway. The union should never have been in the first place.

 

Anyone for that matter, but especially Igbo leaders in any capacity should be concerned about what verdict the next generation would pass on what they did or failed to do. If the present Igbo political leadership and intellectuals failed to see ten, twenty years before now the eventual breakup of Nigeria and emergence of an independent and sovereign Igbo or Biafra nation then something is wrong. By today they ought to have completed all preparations needed to run a successful Igbo/Biafra nation state, separate from Nigeria.

 
It is gross negligence and irresponsibility on the side of Igbo political, business and intellectual leaders of today to be so concerned about what their neighbors, “the frowning demagogues” will say or just being “conscious” of the feelings of the others who are working only for their own people’s benefits, and fail to work for the improvement of the fortunes of the present and future of Igbo people. We are not stretching the truth when we say that the current Islamic Boko Haram scourge against Igbo/Biafrans would never have happened if Igbo intellectuals and leaders had prepared for it ten to twenty years before it began. If this tide of death and destruction that is continuously unleashed on the Igbo in Nigeria must be turned away then Igbo leaders and intellectuals must resolve to reverse this collective suicidal trend of only reacting after the heads of their people have been Islamic-ally cut off.

 
At this point there may still be those who are yet to be convinced and are still bent on finding “solutions” by finding ways through which Igbo people will continue to coexist with the rest of Nigerians in the same country; that is not a problem. It is the duty of the collective Igbo/Biafran leaders and thinkers to patiently work harder still to persuade such persons. No single Igbo or Biafran will be left behind. Igbo opinion leaders, politicians, intellectuals and business people must find a way to patiently educate and persuade every Igbo/Biafra skeptic on why their only option is living independently away from Nigeria. Let them show the people why one-Nigeria is not and can never be an option for Igbo people. Igbo leaders and intellectuals must find the way to convince the residual doubters that the fault or impossibility of a one-Nigerian state is too fundamental and practically irreconcilable. The fault line lies at the center of the unbridgeable differences in the way of life of the various peoples that make up one-Nigeria. The cultural/religious diversities existing amongst the various ethnic peoples that comprise the Nigerian union are irreconcilable. It is the duty of Igbo leaders to convince the unbelievers among their people that culture and a people’s way of doing things is the very essence of the people’s being and cannot be compromised. Let them know that it is the reason why people everywhere fight to death to preserve the way they do things as distinct from those of others. It is the duty of Igbo leaders to convince their people on the fact that no matter the rhetoric on the contrary, no one will win the war for one-Nigeria. It is an ideological warfare, a cultural/religious browbeating. And to win is to begin by positioning the Igbo nation and showing the people how to fight the next Biafra and all other Igbo/Biafra wars before they begin.

 
Osita Ebiem

 
-Masterweb Reports

 
Nigerian Troops Stranded In Nyala, Sudan After The Expiration of Their 6 Months Tour of Duty - We are four Nigerian Battalions (NIBATTS 30, 31, 32 and 33) on duty in Nyala, Sudan from 26 November, 2011 - 2 January, 2012 but now stranded after we are due for rotation. Our expected period of rotation to Nigeria is 26 May - 3 July, 2012 for the four battalions; up till  the time of this report, we have not been rotated. This situation is very depressing and is dangerously affecting us and our loved ones back home.

 

NIBATT 31 was supposed to be rotated back to Nigeria between 31 May - 7 June, 2012. Out of the 800 troops that made up the battalion, only 115 were airlifted to Nigeria on 31 May; the remaining troops are still stranded in Sudan. They have added extra weeks to their official date of departure as well as NIBATT 30 which was supposed to be rotated back home on 26 May.

 
This situation is due to either negligence on the part of the Nigerian government or the Army in taking up their responsibilities abroad with respect to their men and women on tour of duty.

 

As I write, Nigerian Army Peace Keeping Center (NAPKC) in Jaji is full of troops of the four Battalions that underwent training to rotate the stranded 4 Battalions here in Sudan. Also the FOB in Abuja where troops normally spend the night before they are airlifted to Sudan is filled up with troops awaiting airlift to Sudan. Sudan as we all know is a very hostile and a desert country with hash weather that makes living very unbearable. It is unwise for Nigeria to leave us to stay extra days, weeks or months in Sudan after the expiration of our tour of duty.

 

Other Contingents like Thailand, Sierra Leone, Bangladesh, Nepal, Egypt and South Africa have all rotated their troops with chartered planes with passenger seats of about 220. Nigerian Army is waiting for United Nations to organize their rotation for them with a plane carrying only 115 passengers, making us to rotate a battalion seven (7) times x 4.

 

I appeal to Nigerians to use their good offices in telling Mr. President, Senate President, Minister of Defense, Chief of Defense Staff and Chief of Army Staff as a matter of urgency to bring planes (bigger ones) to rotate the four Battalions in Sudan not later than 3 July or else we will create a scenario in Sudan which will deter the on-going peace process in Darfur. 3rd July is our ultimatum. Please publish this to the readership of those in Aso Rock. They are all sitting down in Nigeria eating from our sweat which a battalion generates a month ($700,000:00) for then in the UN.

 
We look forward to seeing this news publish today or tomorrow in the various dallies. Thank you and God bless.

 

Concern Soldiers in Darfur, Sudan.
Email: tamunoblessing@yahoo.com
 

-Masterweb Reports
 
Andrew Azazi's comments at the South South Summit in Asaba that the PDP is responsible for Boko Haram have continued to elicit reactions from different sections of the Nigerian populace long after the comments. People still discuss it with the intensity they discuss the statements of General Buhari that rigging of the 2015 elections would elicit bloody reactions.
 
 
PDP members were pressurizing Jonathan to replace Azazi . The northern elites were calling for his head for suggesting that their tribesmen in the PDP are responsible for Boko Haram insurgency. Some non partisan observers believe that Azazi should resign as the NSA. They feel that as an insider in the Jonathan cabinet he should not expose his principal. I would like to take on the reasons people preferred for Azazi to be thrown away and why such reasoning may be more of emotional and intuitive exercise than logical.
 
 
PDP Chieftains truly believe that Azazi is an ingrate. Discussions with some of them who preside over the affairs of Nigeria show a curious resentment and phobia for Azazi which defies common sense. They accuse Azazi of betrayal and posit that Jonathan needs loyalists around him not people like Azazi. Some of them claimed that they have told their President to rid himself of this nosy and talkative soldier before he ruins their great party’s chances in 2015 election.
 
 
The northern counterparts posit that Azazi is an ethnic bigot who is out to give the north a bad name and damage its reputation among Nigerians with intent of denying the north the chances of 2015 presidency. The PDP as a whole views Azazi with suspicion and the Northern leaders equally view him with suspicion. Azazi was left between two bulldogs trying to tear him to pieces.
 
 
Azazi have served Nigeria in different capacity, the most recent being the GOC of 1st Division, Kaduna in January 2005, The Chief of Army Staff in June 2006 and the Chief of Defence Staff. His recent appointment as the National Security Adviser is not greater than the last two appointments. Azazi have equally had his share of the Nigerian national cake. With all the billions budgeted for the office of the NSA, certainly Azazi cannot be holier than the system he is serving. During his time as army chief, he gave soft landings for militants and encouraged dialogue with his kinsmen. His friends in the military believe that Azazi is aware of all oil bunkering activities within the Niger Delta during his era as military chief. Therefore the theory of ingratitude cannot hold water. Azazi, by Nigeria’s standards was already a fulfilled man, professionally and financially before he came to serve Jonathan. Infact, he actually came to Jonathan’s rescue when the former security adviser, General Gusau indicated interest to run for the presidency in October 2010. Azazi was drafted to help continue the stabilization which Aliyu Gusau era brought to the security arm.
 
 
It is actually the PDP that needs Azazi. The PDP and their style of politics is making the work of Andrew Azazi and other heads of security agencies to be very difficult. These undemocratic tendencies are the greatest security risk Nigeria is facing. Indiscrete electoral fraud caused post election violence in the north of Nigeria in 2011 and the security agencies were called up to clean up the mess. PDP supervised corruption is responsible for mass discontent in the land which in itself is a security risk. Aggrieved PDP members in the north with huge funds are sponsoring Boko Haram in Nigeria as a means of seeking redress for Jonathan jettisoning the zoning structure. The security agencies are also cleaning the mess from the Boko Haram branch of PDP. The subsidy protest is a reaction to PDP harsh economic policies. When the people wanted to overpower the looters, the soldiers were called in to contain the protesters. It is obvious that when the PDP defecates, the security agencies clean up the mess in order to keep the nation one. Yet the shamelessly defecating ruling party is accusing a security head of ingratitude.
 
 
The PDP should be grateful to Andrew Azazi and the heads of other security agencies that there is still democracy in Nigeria. They are yet to know how close this democracy came close to being truncated on two occasions. They should take the advice of Azazi , who actually spoke the minds of other heads of security agencies. They should stop rigging of elections, stop flouting court orders, stop looting the economy, stop shielding corrupt public officials, stop implementing harsh economic and stop sponsoring Boko Haram. This will reduce the mass discontent in the land and eliminate a lot of security flashpoints. However, if they fail to heed the warning, which is most likely, they should at least be grateful that the armed forces are cleaning up the security mess from their anus.
 
 
Andrew Azazi has cleared his conscience. The blood of innocent Nigerians being murdered by the terrorists, hitherto hanging on his Ijaw neck have been sent back to where it ought to hang, the ruling party. He has stomached the bloody deception for long and at last decided to free his conscience. If it pleases Jonathan and the feasters in Aso Rock, let them sack Azazi. He has nothing to lose. This man whom the public view with the same lenses they viewed the sacked Inspector General of Police, Hafzat Ringim, have finally extricated his name from the public tag of incompetence. Other public officers should emulate Patrick Azazi.
 
 
When Remi Babalola alerted on the escalating subsidy scam and insolvency of NNPC powerful persons within the party sought for his head and President Jonathan hurriedly redeployed him to the ministry of Special Duties on the 10th of August 2010 from where he honourably resigned. Babalola went home with a free conscience and the subsidy bill skyrocketed to N2.7 trillion naira in the same year. Audu Ogbeh was forced to resign as PDP chairman by former president Obasanjo when he openly criticised the ceding of Anambra State to the Uba brothers in the aftermath of the torching of state edifices an act which followed the shameless kidnap of former governor Chris Ngige. Mr Vincent Azie was removed as the Auditor General of the Federation a month after he released his audit findings in 2003 which revealed a flagrant violation of financial rules and regulations by the presidency and other organs of government. In the view of some shameless Nigerians, these men had lost out, but before the larger society and before God, they have discharged themselves honourably and freed themselves from the guilt of commission and omission.
 
 
Public officers owe a duty to God and the people of Nigeria to speak against acts capable of putting the nation in jeopardy even if it may endanger their privilege. The day a good number of public officers toes the path of honour by speaking the truth as these men have done then the deliverance of the nation could be perceived from afar.
 
 

 
Obinna Akukwe 

-Masterweb Reports (Submission By Obinna Akukwe)

 
Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, the Dan Maje of Kano has become the most controversial Governor of Central Bank of Nigeria. This grandson of the deposed Emir of Kano was reported to be among the masterminds of the 1994 Kano riot in which Gideon Akaluka was beheaded and thousands of Igbos slaughtered like fowl on the unsubstantiated allegation that Akaluka desecrated the Koran. He was also suspected to have met with Osama Bin Laden during the period he was in Sudan where he obtained a degree in Sharia and Islamic studies from African International University in 1997.

 
Sanusi, through the help of close family friend, Dr Umaru Abdul Mutallab, former Chairman of First Bank for close to ten years and father of the Christmas shoe bomber, joined the board of First Bank as an executive director in charge of Risk Management in 2005, and later became the CEO of the bank in 2009.

 
During Sanusi’s tenure as CEO of First Bank, he exhibited a level of fiscal discipline and helped restructure bad loans for debtors in a manner beneficial to the bank. He reduced incidences of sharp practices within First Bank which pitched him in conflict with MD’S of other Banks who derided his toga of a structural reformer. Sanusi reportedly instituted some level of sanity in the corporate governance of the bank and ensured effective risk management strategy.

 
Sanusi was recommended for the Governorship of Central Bank when the northern oligarchy convinced late president Yaradua that the South cannot control both the banks and the regulatory body at the same time. Sanusi, being a risk management expert, understood all the manipulations of accounting books to produce a determined favourable financial statement and cash flow statements used to hoodwink shareholders, investors and evade regulatory scrutiny. He equally understood the negative impact of massive unsecured loans towards liquidity management in the banking system. Sanusi took the banking industry by storm, by the time he finished the first stanza of his own transformational agenda, a list of monarchical bank MD’S were sent to their villages while others became perennial customers of the EFCC, Nigeria’s anti graft body.

 
Sanusi’s introduction of Islamic Banking has brought him in conflict with the majority of Christians and Southerners of Nigeria who are suspicious of his intentions. His sympathy for Boko Haram and his position that poverty was responsible for the bloodletting drew flaks from informed sources who believe that Sanusi is deliberately distorting facts to suit the north. When Sanusi donated the sum of N100 million naira of CBN money to his home state of Kano in the aftermath of the dastardly Kano Boko Haram attacks, he drew a lot of criticism from Christians, Southerners and other well meaning Nigerians who believe that Sanusi should have been fair enough to extend the same largesse to other non muslim states.

 
Ohaneze Ndigbo criticised Sanusi for the selective donation. According to Ohaneze publicity secretary, Ralph Ndigwe, ‘’We want Sanusi to tell us what he has done for the hundreds of Igbos who were victims of Boko Haram attacks in various parts of the north’’ The criticisms by Ohaneze Ndigbo is reasonably to some extent, but inadequate to redress the constant marginalization of Ndigbo. The fact is that Sanusi dared where his colleagues of Igbo extraction trembled. Sanusi, as CBN helmsman, is loquaciously protecting his people with his influence, position and power. He has succeeded in convincing the Europe and the United States of America with his theory of poverty being responsible for Boko Haram terrorism. He has also succeeded in drawing the attention of the entire world to the fact that Akwa Ibom State gets more federal allocation than all the six states of North East put together. How culpable is Sanusi of bias. Sanusi is guilty of bias while fellow public servants of Igbo extraction are guilty of indifference, petty jealousy and timidity in matters relating to their people.

 
Andy Uba was presidential aide and the most influential person in Olusegun Obasanjo’s cabinet for close to eight years and yet there is no single project that was cited in Igboland as a result of his influence. The Niger Bridge could not get any federal allocation, Onitsha Seaport and Oba Airport couldn’t get federal attention. Enugu-Onitsha expressway was in a deplorable state of disrepair while some other federal roads were getting attention in other parts of the country especially the north. The only federal presence in Anambra State was the security forces who massacred thousands of people at Onitsha while claiming to be looking for MASSOB members.

 
Chukwuma Soludo was Governor of Central Bank; he discharged his duties professionally for Nigeria but there is no CBN policy of his that is beneficial to the commerce and cottage industry disposition of his Igbo kinsmen. He probably propagated Igbo cause by changing his name from Charles to Chukwuma.

 
Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala served Obasanjo and Nigeria to the best of her professional ability and she was another influential cabinet member yet she did nothing to draw the attention of the federal government to the fact that Delta Igbos is the most marginalized in Nigeria. There is no fiscal policy of hers that was favourable to the Igbo race.

 
Ojo Maduekwe was influential throughout Obasanjo tenure and yet he was never known to have defended any Igbo cause. Oby Ezekwesili was another influential figure during the Obasanjo era and yet none of her policies was of assistance to the Igbo traders and businessmen. While in office it was a taboo to speak Igbo to these women and most of their male counterparts while their colleagues from the north and south west regale in using their native tongue as second official languages in their respective government offices.

 
When the presidency decided to replace Ringim as the IG of police, they settled for Azubuko Udah, the DIG Admininistration, the most senior public official of Igbo extraction in Jonathan’s cabinet brought a strong counter recommendation in his reply memo to the president which rubbished both Ivy Okoronkwo, 2nd in Command and Azubuko Udah, 3rd in command. The attempt by Elder statesman Edwin Clarke to convince the president to follow seniority and appoint Udah was shot down by his fellow Igbo and former church member. Anyim Pius Anyim, Ike Ekweremmadu and Emeka Ihedioha are senior Igbo public servants in the Jonathan presidency and they have considerable measure of influence. They should remember the South East now that budgetary cake is being shared because nobody knows the fate of Nigeria tomorrow.

 
Sanusi is implementing policies to help his people especially the masses through his position on revenue allocation, Boko Haram, appointments and donations. What are Igbo public officers doing? They are playing safe in order not to stir the hornets’ nest. They want to be in the good books of everybody in the North, West and South- South. These Igbo public servants should not hesitate to constantly draw the attention of the entire world to the lack of federal presence in Igbo land. They should also donate funds to victims of injustice and Boko Haram attacks from the South East. President Jonathan is channelling over 40 percent of all federal allocations to the Niger Delta region with about 15% of it going to Bayelsa State. He is also ensuring that ex- militants are given adequate professional training by allocating massive funds to the Amnesty Programme. He has handed over Nigeria’s waterways to former militant Tompolo. His people are enjoying unprecedented government patronage. This suggests that Nigerian public officials constantly use state privileges to enhance the progress of their regions. This is not so for Igbo public servants, they are more Nigerian than Nigerians yet the same establishment views them with suspicion.

 
Igbo public servants should wake up from civil war hangover. The war is over and the position of Biafrans for which over three million people lost their lives is now being revisited by other ethnic nationalities who sold the Igbos during the war. Therefore, instead of focusing on Sanusi, they should focus on themselves and use their offices to redress the constant marginalization and humiliation of Ndigbo in the scheme of affairs of Nigeria.

 
Obinna Akukwe

 
*Photo Caption - Governor of Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi

-Masterweb Reports

 
Recent media have been inundated with the gory details of how a member of the Nigerian House of Representatives, Hon. Farouk Lawan of Shanano/Bagwai federal constituency of Kano state allegedly demanded for and received a bribe of $620,000 from Femi Otedola, CEO of Zenon Petroleum and Gas Ltd. Mr Otedola subsequently claimed that this was a sting operation orchestrated by the Nigerian Secret Service to trap the lawmaker in the act by the use of a video recording and marked bills. In a counter argument, Hon. Lawan insists that he on the other hand, played along in order to incriminate Mr Otedola. Actually, according to reports, the sum agreed on was $3 million, with $620,000 being paid as a part-payment, and for the balance to be paid after Zenon was taken off the list of indicted companies in the fuel subsidy report. The essence of this article is not to apportion blame or take sides, but rather to look more closely at the amount of money involved in this scandal.

 
It is by no means the biggest corruption scandal in the country’s history in monetary terms but it will surely rank up there as one of the most audacious. This is due to the fact that Hon. Lawan, who had been charged with the responsibility of investigating the corruption in the petroleum industry, had seemingly discharged his responsibilities without fear or favour, putting up a face of saint-like innocence and brick-like defiance. If it is proved that he is guilty, it would indeed be a sad day for us as a country. However, even if it is not, and it does turn out that the SSS provided the money for this “sting operation” (money which is now missing), how much can $620,000 buy if it were put to productive use? We hear of different amounts of money linked to corruption in Nigeria so often that we have become deadened or immune to the shock of a new scandal. So I decided to get out a notepad and do a little calculation of just how much $620,000 is worth.

 
To start with, based on the older World Bank definition of poverty being the inability to live on equal to or above $1 per day, $620,000 will be able to raise about 21,000 people out of poverty for a month and about 1,700 people out of poverty for a year. It would be sufficient to pay the school fees of about 6,700 children in a year at the primary and secondary levels as well as buy about 20,000 school books at N5,000 a piece. It can provide 23,000 pieces of clothing for children and would be able to pay for the sinking of about 832 boreholes.

 
What is $620,000 worth? It can purchase about 1,000,000 packs of anti-malaria drugs. It can provide anti-retroviral treatment for 4,103 people living with AIDS for one year. It can buy about 8,326 small generators for small and medium scale enterprises. It can also get 2,566 bicycles and 1,998 Innoson motorcycles for transportation of people in the rural areas or for them to start businesses. In addition, it could provide about 1.03 million litres of petrol!

 
Having said the foregoing, it should be noted that $620,000 is only 20% of $3 million. I leave it to your imagination to figure out what this same calculation would have come to, if $3 million was used instead in this analysis. To put things into context, some other recent scandals we have had in the national assembly include $203 million (N32.8 billion) that was allegedly embezzled in the pension scam, $230 million (N37 billion) illegal loan allegedly taken by Bankole and Nafada, and $273,000 (N44 million) bribe allegedly requested by Hon. Hembe. So in conclusion, having seen all this, my question is simple: what are they doing with all this money? 

 
By Chisom Ubabukoh
MSc Development Economics and Policy
University of Manchester
Chislo89@yahoo.co.uk