Translational inhibition due to CHEAP RETIN-A the fact that the path of the excitation occurs Br neuron. recurrent inhibition     Carried intercalary brake cells (Renshaw). Axons of buy nolvadex online canada motor neurons often give collaterals (branches), ending with Renshaw cells. Renshaw cell axons terminate on the body or dendrites of the motor neuron, forming inhibitory synapses. Arousal that occurs in motor neurons travel in a straight path to the skeletal muscle, as well as collaterals to inhibitory neurons, which send impulses to motoneurons and inhibits them. The stronger the motor neuron excitation, the more excited Renshaw cells and the more intense they exert their inhibitory effect, which protects nerve cells from overstimulation. lateral inhibition    
 

General Ojukwu As An Institution

General Ojukwu As An Institution

 -Masterweb Reports
 

Ojukwu was 33years of age when the Nigerian Civil War erupted. He was born in the small Northern town of Zungeru while his father was on a short business trip. Born among the landed gentry of his multi-millionaire father, young Ojukwu grew to boyhood in the embrace of loving parents-Catholic education and Religion shaped his formative years naturally. His father -Sir Louis Odumegwu Ojukwu was a bull of a man, highly cultured but not quite a man of erudition and yet he believed in formal education for all his children. At age 7, young Emeka Ojukwu was encouraged to read the classics on long evenings in front of his father’s huge and complex home.

 
By age 9, Ojukwu could write long passages from Illiad in Pope’s translation and knew the Catholic Bible by heart. Sir Louis died in September 1966,with a Knighthood of St. John-few months after the Nigeria’s military coup. Ojukwu had the education money could buy, Catholic Grammar School in 1940, Lagos King’s College soon after. At age 13, his father sent him to Epson College England and upon completing his high school, he moved into Lincoln College, Oxford. It was here that he had his first clash with his father and won. His father, the Victorian type, wanted him to study Law, but ‘Emeka’ Ojukwu wanted to read Modern History. Driven in on himself, Ojukwu developed a private philosophy of total self-reliance, and unyielding internal sufficiency that required no external support from others.

 
Despite frequent clashes with his House Master, Ojukwu excelled on the highest level of the class, played a good game of Rugby and set a new Junior Discus record. Ojukwu’s British classmate and sports partner called him “a Steam-Engine in pants-an African boy with enormous brain power.” Known to have a volcanic temper, young Ojukwu was deeply involved in students’ protests in his High School days. He was locked up for slapping his white English teacher, Mr Slade, for badgering him over incomplete project. Ojukwu earned his graduate degree in Modern History and hurried to his fatherland-Nigeria. Again, to express his independence, ‘Emeka’ opted for the Civil Service job rather than surrendering to his father’s recommendation- to be the Director of his father’s multi-millionaire business enterprise. He was subsequently made an Assistant Division Officer-[ADO] in a short span of time. In an effort to prove himself, Ojukwu threw himself into the work with great vengeance -personally taking part in building roads, ditches, culverts among the peasantry.

 
Ironically, it was a vital apprenticeship for his future as the General of the People’s Army. At this position, Ojukwu mastered the Psychology of his people-the Ibos at the level of the common man. He understood their problems, fears and aspirations, prejudices and innuendoes. He joined the Nigerian Military after two years of Civil Service. This transition was ironical for a man who was to be accused of “breaking up the federation” during the Civil War. Historically, Ojukwu was a convinced Federalist who resented the narrow confines of regionalism -that straight-jacketed the Civil Service and he saw in the military an institution where tribe, race, and social standing should not count. Non-the less, Gen. Ojukwu was immediately sent for officer training at Eastern Hall, Britain and he graduated as a Second Lieutenant. After further advanced courses at Hythe and War Ministry in Britain, he was later promoted to Captain and sent to Army H/Q Lagos in 1955.

 
Highly talented and showing promise of a military genius, Ojukwu was sent to the popular West African Frontier Force in Ghana as a Lecturer in Tactics and Military Law. Back to Nigeria again, he was appointed Company Commander of the Fifth Battalion of the Nigerian Army. In 1962, Ojukwu was selected for further military training and he attended the Joint Services Staff College in England and upon his arrival in Nigeria, he was promoted to a Lieutenant-Colonel[1963] and became the first indigenous Quarter Master General. By virtue of his experience in this position, Ojukwu adopted a policy of “buying the best Arms and Munitions from any source. ”Under Ojukwu, the major old arms contracts with British firms were cancelled and fresh ones placed with more price-competitive manufacturers in Europe.

 
THE UNTOLD CHARACTER OF GEN. OJUKWU : THE COMPLEXITY AND CONTROVERSY OF A TITAN

 
After the military coup that culminated in the massacre of thousands of Easterners, the Commander of the nation’s Armed Forces appointed Ojukwu to govern the Easterners. He was truly a complex and controversial figure. He was highly respected and equally feared by many who know him intimately. His legacy transcended his military conquests. He was also an unrepentant, aristocratic snob whose devotion to the common soldier and his people was irreproachable. Forty-two years after the Civil War, Ojukwu’s name still reverberates world wide. An Oxford-educated, a military tactician, a Shakespearian admirer. He was an omnivorous reader. He consumed the biographies of Winston Churchill and mastered the Themes in Tolstoi’s War and Peace, and Ghandhi’s Non-Violence. Gen. Ojukwu was a Workaholic, a Public Policy Wonk who plowed through weighty tomes of history for pleasure and knowledge. He worked like the demons and drove his staff crazy with military work assignments. He looked cultured and mild-mannered but could be a fire-brand when angered or provoked.

 
Ojukwu,s life experiences helped him engage in the ineffable crucial struggles for his ‘defeated’ people and in seeking justice and truth, he tended to liberate the truth by seeking liberty for all. Ojukwu was tough. He was charismatic. He was brilliant. He had no peers in the annals of modern warfare. He argued his people’s case with matchless accuracy, thunder and dash. He was passionate, but arrogant where situation called for it. He was vilified and deified by both critics and admirers. When it came to the business of War and Governance and Fair play, Ojukwu had no competitors. His profile reveals a complex personality of a man who struck fear into the Nigerian Civil War Generals and left everyone questioning the sanity of ‘this demigod.’

 
Gen. Ojukwu was “a man of many parts.” He was a master of showmanship, a fighter, a war strategist, perhaps an idealist, an insatiable political animal. Many believed that in a country of imponderables, Ojukwu is Nigeria’s last hope. He was also a mystic who believed in reincarnation, a Catholic by birth and orientation, but a Calvinist in practical daily life. Ojukwu practiced misanthropy- “Save for the Rainy Day.; ”he would always caution. His personal savings summed up to $8million in the British Bank. But he squandered the entire savings when the realities of war became apparent to Biafra. “ Here is a man for whom you could go to hell and come back, ”remarked Captain Anene of the Biafran Engineering Unit, in admiration of Ojukwu’s talents. Many believed in the infallibility of ‘His Excellency.’ His British greatest admirer likened Ojukwu to Daniel Webster-” a super professional with a volcanic inner drive that propelled him on, when others chose to stop.” As both practitioner and philosopher of Martial Arts, Ojukwu was an avid reader, [five hundred words in a minute] a devoted student of his Oxford University and prolific writer and Celebrated Orator. He often used his Diary as a stetch pad and as a means of venting his spleen. The General’s gift for aphorisms had a didactic influence on generations of people. Many quoted him during and after the Civil War. Succinct snatches such as “Hold the serpent by his head”, “ Let all Biafrans sleep with one eye open.” “No power in Black Africa can subdue us” and “May God have mercy on our enemy,” were prominently heralded in the national newspapers and quoted by Foreign Press.

 
August, 15,2005, this writer had one-time opportunity to meet with Gen.Ojukwu at his Enugu War-like - looking Palace. He was routinely surrounded by a handful of the Biafran Ex Generals reminiscing over their pension status and pleading with Gen. Ojukwu to help with their full benefits. It was a casual discussion, but Ojukwu digressed and talked about why the Roman Empire fell and spent endless time synthesizing the qualities that separated Great Commanders from “Average Mortals.” “Leadership is the element that wins battles; I have it but I will be damned if I can’t use it.” he smiled fiendishly to the retired Generals.. He had certain permanent ‘trademarks’ no other human has: a relentless quiet aggression, faith in a military offensive, an uncanny instinct for the enemy intention and dispositions, a steely unwillingness to sustain high casualities-perhaps out of conviction that “cowards die many times before their death.”
 

Ojukwu is a legend. He kept extensive diaries of events but made few confidences. Unlike millions of humans, he was a composite of different personalities, drives and characteristics. He was a distinct African type, equatorial, gallant and seasoned -the product of a tough, difficult, disciplinarian father with no overtones of quilt, a stern morality humanized by British Oxford Education, a profound sense of right and wrong that owed more to the Bible and moral education-“doing the right thing” than to any set of political doctrine. Certainly Ojukwu is the type historian Bernard De Voto called “The tall, the gallant, the gaunt, the powerful, sallow men-men of great mental and physical strength.” Surely, his basic values are those hardened by hard work, perseverance, selflessness, and dignity of labor. Only a few close friends of Ojukwu knew that he was disarmingly informal and ingratiatingly friendly but took himself very seriously. He accomplished his intended daily goals in a record time and chose his intimates meticulously. He trusted few-the consequence of war experience but kept a good distance from his subordinates, except a nucleus of powerful uncles and cousins. ”It’s impossible to be intimate with these hard-playing, rambunctious generals,” commented a war-time Biafran Ambassador defending Ojukwu and pleading anonymity.

 
Visibly anti-imperialist, Ojukwu challenged Harold Wilson and the British government over the morality and brutality of their Arms-Supply policy to one side in the conflict.” “Britain, leave us alone, so that we can solve our problems in our own way.!” Yet, his precise, no nonsense approach to national affairs endeared him to the world leaders. He literally frowned at the complacent and the idiotic, yes, a sterling model for humanity. Ojukwu loved Nigeria, but he loved Biafra more when confrontation became inevitable. He had zero-tolerance for the ‘laggards’- what he called “political insufferable whip-per-snappers.” Close associates of Gen. Ojukwu sworn that he practiced Psychic Phenomenon known as ‘de-ja vu’ -the sensation of having been somewhere or seen military events before. This had extraordinary positive effect on him. That is why Ojukwu viewed war in its broadest panorama, and applied the lessons of the past to real situation and current experiences to future plans.



 
Episodes of the past were deposited in Ojukwu’s mind like grains of gold in South African River ready to be washed out. He would always identify himself with them, and would adopt them as his own subconscious memories. He forgot nothing-he was naturally endowed with encyclopedic mind.-What a mega-photo memory! Ojukwu viewed himself therefore as a timeless man who would have been fit to live in any time and age. “ Gen.Ojukwu would have been a good Field Marshall in the time of Napoleon” remarked a Biafran General in his administration. ’His Excellency’ once affirmed that “Men live in deeds, not in years” as he faced the World Press. He also reaffirmed the occult notion about reincarnation of a ‘fighting man‘ in no uncertain terms in his personal philosophy- “To thy Own Self Be True.” quoting Shakespeare. As an Extraordinary character, Ancient and Modern History made an enormous impact on Ojukwu. Instinctively , young Ojukwu emphasized the study of Ancient History in High Schools and studied Modern History in Oxford, England. He read tons of books on Mythology. “If you want to predict the future ,study the past.“ Ojukwu would always remind the youthful high school Biafrans as he visited local schools. Cerebral and studious, Ojukwu’s mystique is that he projected self-confidence in all situation. He never smiled, except in a magnetic way, and could not be anything else but authentic.

 
Interest in History determined Ojukwu at a tender age to become a soldier later in life. But he’s literally destined by tradition and genetics, ordained so to speak by the chromosomes of Sir Louis Odumegwu Ojukwu and his African ancestors-a kindred known for their frontier mentality. Ojukwu, the product of British Military Schools would always claim: “Im sure, my ancestors are always with me; They’re watching. They expect a lot of me.” and he gesticulated into the high heaven with the contours of his Castroic eyes wider than ever. The General’s first marriage to Njideka produced two sons. But the relationship became a casualty of the Civil War.It floundered on the alter of deromanticism!

 
“Emeka loved his family intimately, but he loved Biafra more“, recalled a close friend of Ojukwu’s wife regrettably. “He’s always at the hem of things-at the war fronts, planning, executing, commanding, plodding-a true perfectionist, no quality time for his family.” General Ojukwu made history for himself. As a positive, creative force in Nigeria and in his chosen profession, as an intellectual, as a natural leader, as a visionary and a comforter, as a military genius, as a writer and an orator, as a chronicler of his time and age, as a peace-maker, as an individual terribly and universally admired and feared alike, as the most controversial Nigerian and African, he remains an enigma and a hydra-headed superman. Simply put, Ojukwu remains an indestructible force. No one can pin him down. He was always at the center of controversy. What an indispensable, ageless political animal! And no wonder that Gen. Ojukwu’s British classmate and Sports Partner nicknamed him “a Steam Engine in Pants.” Though dead and buried, but many believe that this Demi-god [ god of War] is still alive and well, and will continue to contend in Nigeria’s rough-and-tumble politics. The British Tony Blair was very blunt in his description of the General: “There’s universal belief that Ojukwu possesses intimidating-cult personality; face-to-face, it was almost impossible to dislike him. I found I had to like him despite all the evidence to the contrary. He’s truly clever, quick and capable of huge efforts over short time span, and his ethical credentials are beyond reproof.”

 
FINAL DAYS OF A TITAN: While in sick-bed, in London, Gen. Ojukwu warned and advised his people through his most trusted Surrogate - Gov. Peter Obi of “a whirlwind we would reap by not studying our history-history of great events, great Movements and great people.” “If we forget what we did, we won’t know who we are. I’m warning of the eradication of the Ibo Memory that could ultimately result in an erosion of the Ibo Spirit.” The General raised his head from his bed, looked around and signaled to Gov. Obi for a whisper. Surprising to his VIP visitors, Ojukwu continued with what he considered as ‘Dogma of Life for his people’:

 
** “ Eastern States should not be treated as Archipelago of human Suffering or as the Devils’ Island. Rabbits can’t survive in a jungle, only Lions can. The tongue is sharper than two-edged knife- How many times do we kill with our tongues? Don’t forget that America was founded by individuals who first were on their knees before they were on their feet. Don’t ever throw rocks and stones at one another for the sake of political gamesmanship. The signal of Weakness is a dangerous one, and could place you on a Tinder Box. The next Nigerian President should have unprecedented opportunity to break with the past-and re-invent Nigerian Politics at home and its image abroad. No one can live meaningfully without the Bible. With all biological baggage women possess, they are our Best Hope in politics.” “ Corruption in Nigeria requires a multi-prong approach: the Mass Media, prominent individuals in high places, Professors, intellectuals, and private organizations.”

 
BOOKS WISE PEOPLE SHOULD READ: As a British Journalist observed, the General looked exhausted after his long ‘sermon‘ from his sick bed, but his bewitchingly beautiful wife-Bianca quickly served her husband a glass of red wine. , Ojukwu gained momentary energy and moved into another phase of ‘educating’ his hospital friends and visitors the virtues of reading ‘good books.’ “For people to be humanized, they have to read the FOUR most important BOOKS in this universe.” Gen. Ojukwu emphasized with alacrity. ** The Oxford Book of 16th Century Verse- The Glory of English Poetry
** The Complete Works of Shakespeare
** The Bible
** Charles Dickens-by David Copperfield.

 
Bold and unapologetic, Ojukwu’s human engineering is unfathomable. He remains one of the colossus of the Twentieth Century Africa. Energetic, and bull-headed, the retired General is closely watching the dichotomies and tribal intrigues in his native Nigerian Politics. Gen. Ojukwu is truly an INSTITUTION for all Nigerians, the people of the Millennium and particularly for the Ibo race.

 
Hon. Sylvester Obi Dikas reports.

 
Hon. Sylvester Obi Dikas, Ph.D. ( SDikas@aol.com )
Member, Writers’ Guild of America
Scholar of Gen. Ojukwu as An Institution

 
*Photo Caption - Late Dim Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu, Eze Igbo Gburugburu.