Translational inhibition due to CHEAP RETIN-A the fact that the path of the excitation occurs Br neuron. recurrent inhibition     Carried intercalary brake cells (Renshaw). Axons of buy nolvadex online canada motor neurons often give collaterals (branches), ending with Renshaw cells. Renshaw cell axons terminate on the body or dendrites of the motor neuron, forming inhibitory synapses. Arousal that occurs in motor neurons travel in a straight path to the skeletal muscle, as well as collaterals to inhibitory neurons, which send impulses to motoneurons and inhibits them. The stronger the motor neuron excitation, the more excited Renshaw cells and the more intense they exert their inhibitory effect, which protects nerve cells from overstimulation. lateral inhibition    
 

 -Masterweb Reports
 
Public Statement By Intersociety Nigeria: (Onitsha Nigeria, October 26, 2012)-The leadership of International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law notes with gladdened heart the true reflection of the will of the great people of Ondo State in choosing their public officers democratically particularly the occupant of the office of their governor, who was democratically re-elected on 20th day of October 2012, having first been sworn in on 24th day of February 2009 after revalidation of his mandate by the Court of Appeal, Benin Division. The results of the October 20 Governorship Election, announced on Sunday, 21st were another credible match towards the institutionalization of the sanctity of the electoral ballot in Nigeria , which is in tandem with the immortal principle of-it is better to have 10.000 live votes than to have 10million dead votes. Unlike in Nigeria’s previous elections, particularly the pre-2011 elections where dead voters and votes held sway; the Ondo State election voters and votes were not robotically created. With 1.638,950 registered voters and 624,659 voted; out of which 594, 244 votes were valid and 30,415 invalid, the Ondo election is demographically and scientifically incontestable. It also passed the litmus test of common sense. The voters were also conscientiously fair in the choice of their candidates, especially their vote-distribution and electoral choice index reflected in the votes received by the three leading candidates-Mimiko, Oke and Akeredolu, who are now winners and losers.

 
By simple calculations, the 260,199 Ondo valid voters chose Dr. Olusegun Mimiko and his Labour Party as the most favoured and popular candidate and party in the State; the second most popular and favoured candidate and party went to Barr. Olusola Oke and his PDP with 155,961 valid votes, while the ACN; the Southwest (Oduduwa) regional party and its candidate, Mr. Rotimi Akeredolu, SAN (former NBA boss) was chosen as the third most popular and favoured party and candidate in the State with 143,512 valid votes. By Local Government distribution, Labour Party and its winner was more popular in 13 LGAs, PDP and its candidate was more popular in 2 LGAs with runners up in others that made it to garner more votes than the ACN, while the ACN and its candidate was more popular in 3 LGAs. As a result of this, the people of Ondo State have spoken again in collective hallowed voice through their 594,244 valid representatives. They first spoke in April 2007, but the forces of evil and organized ballot criminals quenched their hallowed voice temporarily until in February 2009 when some mortal angels in the temple of justice returned their sacred mandate to its rightful owner, having been emboldened by Mr. Peter Obi of Anambra State and the State-based progressive democratic forces.

 
Lessons Learnt: One of the bitter lessons of organizing credible elections in Nigeria of late, such as the Ondo Election is the blatant refusal of the defeated politicians and their parties to accept defeat and use of some, if not many media establishments to discredit the credibility of such polls. Even when such media establishments are drafted to observe the elections and put their outcomes in black and white, the same media bodies go hell wire in discrediting the credibility of the said polls under the guise of hear the other sides and cash-and-carry journalism. Today, for reasons of parochial and material interests, defeated politicians, their parties and media collaborators have refused to adopt the natural and universal best parameters for determining credible polls and their results. It is correct to say that these malevolent political players never wish Nigeria and Nigerians to have credible elections and their results in their electoral industry.

 
The second bitter lesson is the trial of election cases on the pages of newspaper by lawyers hired by the defeated politicians and their parties. Court-room matters including election matters are like criminal investigations that strictly require confidentiality and authenticity to retain their substances. The raging Salami Scandal is a case in point. The undue uses of media by practicing lawyers make them the worst in litigation performance index. These lawyers are best described as 911 Lorry or Gwongworo lawyers. For instance, one of Nigeria’s new breed most creative and noiseless lawyers is Mr. Onyechi Ikpeazu, SAN. He is hardly heard on the pages of newspaper in litigation matters, whether civil, criminal or electoral, yet he has turned out to be one of the Nigeria’s finest lawyers. On the other hand, the Nigeria’s most talkative lawyers are some, if not many of the Lagos-based SANs, who have also penetrated Abuja. Apart from getting fat briefs through media noise-making and litigating by media, their contributions towards the growth of law and rule of law in Nigeria are near-zero. They commit legal and professional blunders and turn them into objects for media and legal canonization. They function simultaneously as members of political parties, pro-democracy groups, civil rights groups and legal profession. The case of Mr. Rotimi Akeredolu, who was the NBA boss during the Salami Scandal of 2009/2010 with alleged ACN links and the party’s governorship candidate in the just concluded Ondo governorship poll, is a typical example. Also, the case of Ayo Isa Salami, who was the Appeal Court boss then, accused of being the ACN sympathizer, is a second typical example. Through the antics and exploits of these Lagos lawyers, some, if not many of the Apex and Appellate decided cases in the country are not socially developmental in comparison with their counter-parts in Brazil, Ghana, South Africa and the Scandinavian countries. They dominate national discourse on socio-economic salvation yet they are the same accomplices who collude with Nigeria’s master economic criminals to return the country back to cave. Nigeria’s statutory laws and case-laws are steadily retrogressive courtesy of her rogue members of outer, inner and bench Bars (talkative lawyers).

 
The third good lesson is that in no distance future, indiscriminate filing of elections petition cases in electoral courts in Nigeria will fizzle out if the polls’ outcomes continue to reflect the true wishes of the Nigerian people. For instance, most of the 1,695 existing Federal and State electoral seats in the country were judicially unrevoked after the 2011 general elections. Unlike in the previous elections where petitions were filed in almost all of them, a reasonable number of the said seats were not judicially contested, while most of those contested were judicially affirmed particularly the 31 governorship seats. These were and still are hugely attributed to a slight departure recorded in the 2011 general polls, from the usual armada of frauds that characterize the Nigeria’s electoral industry especially the previous rogue voter-register. It is our total submission that the July14 and October 20 staggered governorship elections in Edo and Ondo States are an appreciable improvement in Professor Attahiru Jega’s Nigerian election midwifery. It is our firm hopes that billions of Nigeria’s tax payers’ money spent directly and indirectly during elections seasons in election petitions cases will be maximally reduced in no distance time if elections continue to be credible. Kudos to INEC over the Ondo credible poll!

 
Why Ondo Poll Is Beyond Judicial Revocation, Salami Magic & Media Noise-making: Unlike in Osun and Ekiti States’ governorship election disputes which were resolved through Salami Magic, the Ondo State election litigation, from all intents and purposes, is judicially irrevocable. It is also immune from the viruses of Salami Magic. Not even media noise-making can alter the sacred decision of the respected Ondo voters. Judiciary as the bastion of the commoners cannot taint the hallowed electoral decisions of the Ondo people no matter the amount of media noise-making and threat of litigation by the defeated sectional political players, who blatantly refused to accept defeat banking on judicial one-chance. Also, the possibility of Salami Magic replicating itself in the instant case has been done a fatal blow by many emerging factors. For instance, by Section 285(2) of the Constitution of Nigeria 1999 as amended, the governorship election tribunal is created and the governorship election petition originates therein; by Section 246(3) of the same Constitution, first appeal from governorship election matter lies at the Appellate Court; and by Section 233(2)(e)(iv) , it ends or terminates at the Supreme or Apex Court. By the provisions of Section 285(5) (6) and (7), filing of the governorship election petition takes 21 days after the date of the declaration of the official results (i.e.22/10/2012); the matter is originally heard and determined within 180 days at the tribunal; re-examined and disposed of at the Appellate Court within 60 days; and affirmed or rejected at the Apex within 60 days. The foregoing provisions are subject to exceptional circumstances such as retrials at the original electoral tribunal as may be so ordered superiorly. In all, the entire governorship matter is to last for 10 months, from the tribunal to the Apex Court.

 
So even if Salami Magic still holds sway at the tribunal and the Appellate Court, it may not see the light of the day at the Apex Court, which is a mirror through which the country’s judiciary performance index is viewed by the outside world. To avoid the hallowed mandate freely given by the Ondo people being a victim of technical justice, we advise the winner of the sacred mandate to scout for and assemble sound, creative and noiseless lawyers both Silk and non-Silk so as to judicially prove the authenticity of the sacred mandate within the confines of preponderance of probabilities or credible pieces of evidence and retain same with a view to holding it in competent trust for the people of Ondo State in the next four years. The Ondo governorship election outcome is a critical moment of assessment and re-assessment for the losers especially the Action Congress of Nigeria in its zone of grip it came abysmally third despite its thirst and raging policy of politics of malevolent ethnicity and exclusion as well as candidates’ imposition and assemblage of election riggers in its fold. It is shocking and deafening that the party is relegated to the background as the third most preferred party after PDP; a party some have described as , a celebrated party of rioters and brigands. For ACN to have lost Ondo State poll after it lost Kwara and Kogi States as well as all its governorship elections’ litigations arising from the 2011 general poll, means that its sectional policy, among others require radical review. Judicially speaking, the party’s victory in Edo State in 2008 is still worth celebrating, but its victories Osun and Ekiti States in 2010 are still seen by many as a coup using the hallowed temple of justice. Once again, we congratulate Citizens Peter Obi of Anambra State, Adams Oshiomole of Edo State and Olusegun Mimiko of Ondo State for their resilient judicial struggles to reclaim their stolen mandates from Nigeria’s unrepentant electoral criminals, who have been allowed to walk the country’s streets as free members of the society despite their heinous electoral crimes. Citizen Peter Obi is particularly commended for sleeping in electoral courts for almost three years in order to get back his brutally stolen mandate, which emboldened others to follow suit. The trio of Obi, Oshiomole and Mimiko are Nigeria’s three-pillared inventors of staggered election chemistry in the 21st century Nigeria.

 
We heartily commend INEC and the credible election monitors and observers including the media, the TMG and the Women Arise for their dogged roles that made the poll a success.

 
Signed:

 
Emeka Umeagbalasi, BOT Chairman
08180103912
umeagbalasi@yahoo.com,info@intersociety-ng.org

 
*Photo Caption - Emeka Umeagbalasi

 -Masterweb Reports
 
My attention was drawn to an article (Ngozi Iweala: Nigeria’s Weakest Link) by one Sonala Olumhense. After reading the piece, I concluded that only someone who has absolutely no regard for conscience and truth could have attempted to create such large-scale deception as is being peddled by the writer of this malicious article. It is indeed amazing the extent some people can go just to bring themselves to limelight.

 
The efforts of Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala to reinvigorate the economy and fight corruption have been widely acknowledged by Nigerians and the world at large. Therefore, such a prejudiced concoction, as Olumhense’s, is not just a distractive tactic but also a tit-for-tat attempt in connivance with corrupt individuals in high places, whose evil machinery has been grounded by this exceptional woman. Indeed, this is another manifestation of the Nigerian analogy that when you fight corruption, corruption fights back!

 
Without much ado, I will like to examine the ten points on which Olumhense premised his baseless case.

 
Point One: His report on the failure of the National Economic Empowerment and Development Strategy (NEEDS) is a blatant lie. Under this programme, Nigeria was able to pay its debts arrears owed to some International Finance Institutions (IFIs), particularly the Paris and London Clubs via: (1) Direct repayment where $6.4b was paid (2) Debt buy-back arrangement where $8b was settled at 25% discount, and (3) Debts write-off where $16b was written-off by the creditors. The entire Paris Club debt relief enjoyed by Nigeria totalled US$18b, or a 60% for a US$12.4b payment of arrears and buyback. Similarly, the debts owed to London club commercial creditors were also restructured and paid off. The domestic debts constituting about 12% of GDP in 2005, owed to contractors and civil service pensioners were systematically paid.

 
Other economic spheres where NEEDS recorded appreciable achievements include fiscal and monetary policies. Public spending was reduced from 47.0% in 2001 (before she assumed office) to 35.4% in 2004, which resulted in budget surplus of 7.7% of the GDP for 2004, up from deficits of 4-5% of the GDP in 2002-2003 (USAID, 2006). The list is endless. Anyone can search the records and see for themselves.

 
Point Two: Sonala claimed that billions of naira was drained and is still being drained into the poverty eradication programme involving 13 federal ministries. However, this is another vituperative attack against the person of Okonjo-Iweala. How could he possibly link the Finance Minister with the performance or otherwise of 13 other ministries in such a direct manner? As the Coordinating Minister of the Economy, she is supposed to carry out oversight functions – and that she seems to have been doing quite well. Her efforts to ensure that MDAs deliver have been widely acknowledged. Ministries, departments and agencies that are not living up to their billing are constantly being checked. It is only fair to acknowledge that, in spite of the challenges of corrupt officials who may be trying to divert the poverty eradication funds, the programme has recorded a commendable degree of success in the areas of youth employment, rural infrastructural development, social welfare services and national resources development.

 
Point Three: The writer also claimed that in the negotiations with the Paris Club, one “top member” of the government walked away with a personal fee of N60 billion. He went on to indict former president Obasanjo and Okonjo-Iweala claiming that none of them had ever challenged it, as if that would validate his spurious allegations. Obviously, madam minister has enough work on her table and is more concerned with serious matters of state to be taken in by such rootless ranting. How can someone who prides himself as a neutral social critic make such bogus claims as these without backing them with concrete facts? Who is the “top member” of the government that walked away with a personal fee of N60 billion? I dare Olumhense and his sponsors to name the person if indeed his claims are true. It is only unintelligent people like Sonala who would make stupid accusations like that in a process that is vetted internationally.

 
Point Four: The success of the MDG programme is another area where the writer of this malicious article has chosen to ignore the facts. Apart from the records, which are readily available, the impact of the MDG programme has been widely felt across the nation. Ask the students who now have new classrooms, or the rural dwellers that have now have access to basic facilities including well-equipped health centres. Time and space will not permit me to give a detailed analysis via this medium. But, really, how necessary is that when anyone can easily check the facts for themselves?

 
Points Five and Six of Olumhense’s article refer to Okonjo-Iweala’s tenure as finance minister during the Obasanjo regime without due recourse to the fact that she left that office in 2006. For conscience’s sake, you cannot hold her responsible for events that transpired when she was not in office!

 
Point Seven: Olumhense wrote, In a speech after she left office, Mrs. Okonjo-Iweala said: “General Abacha looted about $3-5 billion from the Nigerian treasury in truckloads of cash in foreign currencies, in traveler’s checks and other means. Most of these monies were laundered abroad through a complex network including some of the world’s best known banks.” Now, how does that prove his point? Isn’t it obvious that this writer is only attempting to insult our intelligence?

 
Point Eight: Olumhense wrote, the pioneer chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, and a very close friend of Mrs. Okonjo-Iweala, has confessed that the Obasanjo government was more corrupt than that of Abacha. This is another serious blunder. I thought the EFCC is saddled with the responsibility of stemming the tide of corruption. Since when has that become part of NOI’s job description? Even at that, her relentless commitment to tackle corruption has been so effective as to have earned her the name “Okonjo Wahala” by those whose corruption coffers are being ripped open.

 
Point Nine: Obasanjo was said to have indicted Mr. Jonathan’s government of squandering $35 billion of Nigeria’s foreign reserves since May 2007, saying the money may have been “shared.” This is another lame point begging for validation. It is too bad that Olumhense would use this as a point against the Finance Minister, thinking Nigerians would be as gullible as himself to accept it hook, line and sinker. If he possesses such evidence of corruption against Mrs Iweala, then his patriotic duty is to report her to the EFCC. People like him are responsible for the persistent lack of progress in Nigeria, because they will rather have a mediocre in charge of the economy.

 
Point Ten: The writer’s claim that the ‘Transforming Nigeria Document’ is not yet available is the easiest pointer to his malicious intentions as the article has long been published and has been in the public domain for nothing less than seven months. Anyone can simply Google and download the document from the National Planning Commission website: http://www.npc.gov.ng/vault/Transformation.pdf.

 
How come Olumhense did not see all the good things being done by the Finance Minister? Why did he not mention the reduction in recurrent expenditure, the bringing of oil subsidy profiteers to book, the ports reform, the Sovereign Wealth Fund, the poverty eradication and women empowerment policies and other good things being implemented by the minister? Olumhense is like the proverbial loafer who, whilst ignoring the life-sustaining functions of the sun, frequently complains that it casts shadows. Sonala Olumhense and people like him must realize that any fool can criticize, condemn and complain.

 
I pity the future of this country with people like him wielding whatever modicum of influence they have on hapless Nigerian readers with the liberty that their pen – or more appropriately – their computer and internet modem afford them. Olumhense’s argument is warped and his reasoning debased. People like him don't amount to much on a penny worth of paper. And they make far worse administrators than the people they set out to criticise. It is obvious that Olumhense is the weakest link in all of Nigerian media given that he is an outright liar!

 
Ayodeji Sunday reports.

 
Ayodeji, a social commentator and community development advocate, writes from Lagos.
 
 
*Photo Caption - Nigeria Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

 -Masterweb Reports
 

The Nigerian budget of 2012 and 2013 has generated a lot of public interest – and rightly so. After all, the budget is the most concrete declaration of our government’s national priorities; and it’s good we are now beginning to take government to task on the management of our nation’s resources.

 
It is no news that over the years, the performance of the Nigerian budget has been far from desirable, as will be revealed by a cursory examination of relevant facts and figures. However, at a closer look, it is easy to see that we are on the path to recovery. You probably don’t agree with that. Wait until I clarify my point. I do not dispute the abysmal performance of the Nigerian budget so far. But with the new paradigms that are being adopted in the process of budget preparation and implementation, one can confidently affirm that things are getting better.

 
Any lettered individual can examine the 2012/2013 budget and see its close kinship with budgets that work in western and other African nations. Thanks to the economic team headed by the Minister of Finance and Coordinating Minister for the Economy, Dr Mrs Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. Gone are the days when the budget process is shrouded in mystery. Now, improved budget transparency has increased public engagement in the budget process and the masses can actively participate in and potentially influence the way in which their money is being spent.

 
Just like what obtains in other countries, we have witnessed a significant increase in the capacity of Civil Society Organisations to hold the government accountable for decisions related to allocation of public funds. Notable among such bodies is the Citizens Wealth Platform, a group of non-governmental and faith-based organisations. This development has ensured that the budget is more favourable to the interests of the poor masses who constitute the larger percentage of the population.

 
It is also encouraging to note the drop in recurrent expenditure from a worrisome 74% in the 2011 budget to 71.47% in the 2012 budget and 68.66% in the proposed 2013 budget. Simultaneously, capital expenditure is expected to rise from 28.53% in 2012 to 31.34% in 2013 and will continue in like manner subsequently. The steady downward trend in recurrent expenditure and upward trend in capital expenditure is another development that is in line with international best practices.

 
What is more, the government has expressed its commitment to ensure that the budget makes practical impact on the areas that matter most to the Nigerian people – job creation, power supply, roads, rail, other infrastructure and, of course, agriculture. One cannot but recognise the efforts of the economic team to ensure that the nation’s resources are managed prudently and transparently while prioritizing key growth sectors of the economy and national security.

 
The efforts of the Finance Minister to ensure early implementation of the 2013 budget is yet another positive step in bridging the gap between our national budget and the performing budgets of other nations. Even though we still have a long way to go, it is reassuring to know that we are on our way to having a performing budget. We may not be there yet, but we are definitely not where we used to be.

 
Ayodeji Sunday reports from Lagos.

 
*Photo Caption – Map of Nigeria 

 -Masterweb Reports
 

Public Statement By Intersociety Nigeria: (Onitsha Nigeria, 18th October 2012)-Four years ago, history repeated itself in Ondo State, Southwest Nigeria, when it became the third State in Nigeria, after Anambra and Edo to restore through credible judicial pronouncements, the sacred mandate of the Ondo gubernatorial voters to its rightful owner. These sacred judicial pronouncements were to be replicated in Osun and Ekiti States two years later, only for them to be brutally corrupted and bastardized by the Judases in the Silk and Bench as well as extremist sectional politicians, masquerading as central opposition party politicians. The abominable acts have since exploded into an unquenchable scandal called Salami Scandal. Like the brutal murder of the Igwes in Anambra State in September 2002, which has refused to be forgotten despite over N1.5billion squandered by the chief culprits to cover it, the Salami Scandal is still raging not minding that procured and stage-managed rallies, protests, processions, media propagandas, etc, gulping billions of naira of the public wealth have been squandered to cover it as well as to canonize its chief culprit.

 
Today, more revelations pertaining to the dastardly acts are coming out in torrents both by facts and by figures. Apart from one of the indicted, who vehemently denied being a card-carrying member of the political party at the center of the scandal, but a practicing Silk, being made the party’s gubernatorial candidate in the gubernatorial election coming up in Ondo State on 20thOctober 2012, the ongoing brutal verbal attacks directed at the national leadership of the Women Arise led by Dr. Joe Okei-Odumakin by the Publicity Secretary of the Action Congress of Nigeria and the responses by the former is another eye-opener to the Salami Scandal. In less than 48hrs, the ACN image maker has issued three public statements, attacking the Okei-Odumakin leadership of the Women Arise over its accreditation by the INEC to observe the said crucial poll. The worse is that the ACN image maker has reduced his position to a market square women’s gossip and tongue-wagging and coloured and clothed his responses in the layers of gender and religious sentiments, thereby making mockery of his party and office. His accusations against the Okei-Odumakin leadership of the Women Arise are both morally and legally baseless. Also, the former’s party cannot go to equity with soiled hands. Instances abound.

 
The vehemence with which these attacks via three vitriolic public statements in less than two days are being so directed are giving us mountainous worries. They are both politically jittery and life-threatening. To confirm our intense fear, the Okei-Odumakin’s group has cried out and raised an alarm over possible violent attacks against its members and its leadership before, during and after the crucial poll. This is more so when her leadership has voiced out why it boycotted the so-called pro-Salami rally and issues therein, which suggest that the pro-Salami canonization bids, from the beginning,are politically oiled. The philosophies of hegemonic politics, information warfare and political intolerance are no longer in vogue in the polity of comity of nations. We not only support the Women Arise’s right of observation in the Ondo gubernatorial poll, but we also adopt it as our proximate rep in the said crucial poll. The ACN must be tolerant and accommodating in politics, and must no longer repeat its seeming infamous politics of exclusion and ethnicity especially in Lagos where despite the teeming population of the people of the Southeast resident in the strategic parts of the State including Ojo LGA, none of them was allowed to occupy by popular votes, an elected LGA/LGDA seat, not even in Ojo LGA that is popularly called Igbo LGA.

 
We wish to warn sternly that if anything untoward happens to Dr. Joe Okei-Odumakin or any of her group’s members before, during and after the crucial Ondo gubernatorial poll, heavens will let loose locally, nationally, sub-regionally, regionally and globally. The coming Ondo poll must be totally participatory, popular, credible, free and fair, irrespective of political party, CSO and marital affiliations in the State and beyond.

 
Emeka Umeagbalasi, BOT Chairman
International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law, Nigeria

 
*Photo Above - Emeka Umeagbalasi

 -Masterweb Reports
 

Frightening statistics are arriving. Remove the Igbos from the country, and Nigeria will collapse like 1-2-3, like a flimsy deck of cards. Despite all their travails, the Igbos are the tribe chosen to bear the burdens of Nigeria. Throughout the 50 years Nigeria has masqueraded as an independent nation, Igbos have been credited with making meaningful strides to maintain Nigeria’s membership among the league of civilized nations. What the Igbos garnered with picks the other tribes scattered with spades or embezzled or sold off with when no one was looking, And the Northern oligarchies, long known for their aversion to Western education, are rarely stakeholders in Nigerian affairs. The Bedouins have siphoned off all they could to Saudi Arabia and other clandestine places. Now, tell me. What have the oligarchies done with the zillions of Naira sunk into Northern abyss? Nothing. An absolute zero. Zilch. Nothing was accomplished unless you want to determine the numbers of the blind, leprous, and beggary citizenry neglected by their state governments. The Igbos are the only tribe to possess the semblance of modernization and patriotism that translates to patriotism or desperately needed love of country. Can one say the same thing about the other tribes?

 
Statistics proves the Igbos are becoming the fastest growing ethnic group in the world, making up 75-80% of Lagos, 40% of Northern cities such as Kano or Jos; and flocking to Ghana by the hundreds everyday. The ubiquitous Igbos are migrating to America, UK and Canada by the millions. Why? First, the Igbos love to lead; they love education and they love progression, as opposed to regression (defined as weakening, failure, decay, deterioration, waning, drop, or degeneration). The Igbos hate stagnation in all its ramifications.How else can the Igbos duplicate themselves but through education and regeneration (defined as renewal, revival, renaissance, rejuvenation, or restoration)?

 
The Igbos believe in taking care of their children. Contraception is a taboo in the Igbo culture where madu ka eji aka (we win by sheer numbers). Advocating sterilization or abortion in the Igbo community is considered the enemy’s ploy to wipe out the tribe, much as the boko harans, a group of violent, illiterate, nihilistic disaffiliates attempting to express political ambitions camouflaged as diabolical religious views. Fourthly, the physical Igbo child is sublime (defined as inspiring, inspirational, sensational, awe-inspiring, moving, transcendent or simply motivating). Who doesn’t know that Ahamefula (my name shall not be lost) and Nwakaego (the child is more valuable than money) are popular names for Igbo boys and girls, respectively?A child provides the mechanism through which society continues to exist. So, what do the Igbos do to maintain the leadership Nigeria desperately needs?

 
Let Igbo brains spring forth and excogitate ways to maintain the leadership Heaven has thrust upon them, particularly leadership in agriculture, business, education, politics, and medicines. There are sore difficulties involved in leading Nigeria by way of increased agricultural production because the Igbos have not much arable land, as you have in Benue State and other states in Northern Nigeria.And if the Igbos manage to buy some arable land, good policies will have to be put in place to prevent people squabbling and committing crimes as inhabitants in the Western Nigeria do with body parts. Try confiscating Izza land in Abakaliki, and you risk of having disgruntled men come after you with machetes, and blunt implements. Entrepreneurship won’t do it because the Northern Nigerian oligarchies, as hosts, do not usually allow the visitor free purchasing power in land . Case in point: Igbo visitors in Northern Nigeria are chased out after developing the land.

 
With the level of economic power the Igbos have, they can easily electrify Nigeria, build roads, and usher in massive industrial development to make unemployment a thing of the past. Will non-Igbo tribes whose faces are contorted by murderous jealousy allow this to happen? Please reread my essay on Nigeria being the burden of suffering Igbos: the Igbos must develop Nigeria and be willing to die in the process. Since agriculture and education are not viable tools in Igbos hands to develop Nigeria, could one consider entrepreneurship as an alternative? But my homeboy Silas stopped me with a reminder: “Remember the Ebenato man from near your mother’s village and how he placed his medical degree from India in the toilet and went into business like crazy?”

 
What of education? Because the Igbos have been lovers of education long before Nigeria achieved independence as a sovereign nation, they had become successful community developers, city planters, and managers of schools.Igbos went to school with intensity and acquired all types of skills that kept Nigerian in good stead as the country prepared for self government. There are Igbos with expertise in all fields Nigeria needs to develop as a nation. It is unfortunate that tribalism, nepotism, and greed do not permit full exploitation of Igbo talents. After working for 2- years as so at jobs under dangerous, unfriendly conditions, the Igbos are packing their bags and heading into business, Silas comes again: “Remember that young doctor from your village with engineering doctorate who served as commissioner for the environment in the North and how he quit and went into self employment at Abuja?” Yes, I remember this man and once spoke with him.

 
“Dr O (real name), Sir, what are you doing at Abuja?”

 
“Environmental consulting with Federal Government.”

 
“Ehe, damn. Why’s that so, homeboy?”

 
“I just don’t see myself working for someone in a hostile environment or being in some political appointment.”

 
How do the Igbos measure up in politics? There are rumors the Igbos arenot temperamentally suited for politics; they are too inflexible, impatient, proud, self aggrandizing, and possess a convoluted theory of tribal superiority (just as the Jews do).Many Igbo friends decry corruption, downrightthievery and piracy of national treasury. Yet, give the some Igbos power over some important entities such as the Central Bank, and see what happens. From the body parts traders to the West and the cattle herdsmen in the North, the Igbos must not learn to rob motherland literally blind. Success in politics requires you learn by association and play wuruwuru games with the Hausas, Fulanis, Yorubas, Oyibo, armed robbers and kidnappers, all of whom you hold dear as bosom friends. Besides, politics isn’t about progress or love of country. The Igbos must be chameleons that change colors to match the environment? Successful Igbos are those who understand how to accommodate the other Nigerian tribes. Why Accommodation Is Not Enough is a topic for another essay.

 
Dr. James C. Agazie ( jamesagazie@yahoo.com )
678-886-1613

 
*Photo Caption - Map of Igboland (homeland of Ndigbo of Nigeria) 

-Masterweb Reports
 
From 2009 till date, celebrations to mark Nigeria’s Independence and most national and public holidays have been marred by bomb explosions and killings of innocent citizens. On December 25, 2009, Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab, a 23-year-old Nigerian man then, educated in Mechanical Engineering at a prestigious University College, London launched Nigeria into international spotlight as a terrorist state, when he failed to detonate a bomb to blow-up a US Northwest Flight 253 with hundreds of passengers on board traveling from Amsterdam-Schipol airport to Detroit, Michigan, USA. Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab, we later learned is the sixteenth and youngest son of a wealthy Nigerian in the name of Alhaji (Dr.) Umaru Mutallab, a staunch member of the Northern Oligarch and one of the huge beneficiaries of Nigeria’s oil wealth. Today, Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab is spending time in the U.S. prison instead of working to give back to the nation that spent millions of tax payers’ money and oil wealth educating him in British universities.

 
Since then especially during most national holidays, Nigerians wake every morning worried and afraid where the next bomb explosion will go off. These bombings and irrational killings have been going on since Dr. Jonathan Ebele Goodluck, a southerner and Christian replaced late president, Alhaji Umaru Yar’Adua in May, 2010 and subsequently elected president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria in April, 2011. In that same year, October 1, a bomb explosion almost derailed the 51st Independence Anniversary and two months later, on December 25, 2011, Boko haram sect unleashed the most deadliest, dastardly and despicable terrorist assault on innocent Nigerian Christians at the Saint Theresa’s Catholic Church, Madalla, Niger state and other coordinated bombings of churches in Jos, Plateau State and Damaturu, Yobe State, that killed many parishioners and injured hundreds beyond recognition. One horrifying photo showed the brains of a young baby totally blown out. Boko-Haram chose the most Holy Day of Christianity to inflict the worst evil, vile, barbaric, and satanic massacre of innocent church worshippers. It was not just an attack on Nigerian Christians but an assault on Christianity in general. It caused an outrage and provocation on the part of the Christian community, until today, many bombs explosions and killings have occurred and yet no meaningful arrest or dialogue has been made.

 
And so this year, even though the 52nd Independence Anniversary was celebrated with low profile in the confines of Aso Rock, which is unusual, yet the jihadist sect went on rampage in at-least three northern States including the massacre at the Federal University of Mubi, Adamawa State, where 46 students were shot dead and several stabbed to death - all linked to the dreaded Nigeria's Islamic Jihadist sect known as "Boko-haram," which means "Western Education is Evil." The group is agitating for an Islamic-Sharia for the 19 States in the north.

 
The Christmas massacre and the U.N. bombing were deadly, but I think the Mubi massacre is probably the vilest and deadliest. It is sad that these kinds of internal terrorism currently assaulting northern Nigeria are sponsored mostly by outsiders. From al Shabaab- a radical group out of Somalia that is linked with al-Qaeda to Mali and Libya in the North - these countries are now besieged by al-Qaeda militants killing innocent people at random and the nations' security forces are unable to tame them.

 
This brings me to make this point that the real cause or root of Nigeria’s problem is religion. Many Nigerian writers, commentators, pundits and leaders of thought have proffered reasons for Nigeria’s problem and underdevelopment, such as poor leadership, corruption, amalgamation, ethnicity, tribalism, lack of patriotism, intolerance, ignorance, and others. I agree with all that and I have written extensively on those topics. But the more I read and study Islam, its core theology and beliefs, which are entrenched in Islamic political and economic life, and Muslim fanatics, the more I’m cautious to say that the real cause of Nigeria’s problem is deeply rooted in religion, religious ignorance, and religious intolerance.

 
Religion is the root cause of Nigeria’s failure as a nation. However, it does not undermine the other reasons that have been advanced for Nigeria‘s woes. I think those reasons are just the offshoot of the root problem. Currently, I’m working on a book entitled: “The Problem with Nigeria,” will seek to expand the discussion and include thorny subjects such as the origins of the inhabitants of Nigeria, ethnicity, tribe, culture, values, social norms and off-course religion and faith as some of the reasons behind Nigeria’s social, economic, political problems. But for the purpose of this piece, I’ll limit to the issue of religion and faith.

 
Religious belief has everything to do with a nation’s social, cultural, political, and economic development. It also impacts a nation’s core value system and patriotism. Religious intolerance and religious conflict is a big threat to the security, unity and prosperity of any country. Religious ignorance and intolerance breed violence. Religious ignorance, intolerance and violence are a big problem in Africa. In the continent of Africa, religious violence and ethnic cleansing are enormous. Religious violence has decimated more lives in Africa in the last 50 years than hunger, disease, accidents and even wars combined together. Africa and Middle East have been properly called a "Bloody Continent." They are a battleground between Islam, Christianity and traditional religions. Muslims and Christians kill each other in Egypt, Nigeria, Sudan, Somalia, Senegal, Rwanda, Kenya, Mali, Burundi and other places in Africa and the world.

 
In addition to the bloody violence and conflict between these widely known religions, we have the pagans and African traditional religions with thousands of fetish shrines all around the country. These Fetish priests use hypnotism and witchcraft to deceive ignorant, debased and hopeless people looking for quick and magical ways to achieve success or solve their problems. Some of these fetish priests kill and slaughter new born babies for rituals. This same religious ignorance and intolerance is also rampant among Christians.

 
I’m truly convinced that the root cause of Nigeria’s crisis is religion, religious intolerance, religious ignorance and lack of national identity. Nigeria has no national patriotic values. Nigeria is simply a bunch of empires and kingdoms lumped to live together without any parameters to define what the new nation is or will be. In a nutshell, Christianity and Islam cannot cohabit – not in Nigeria’s case. There is no nation like Nigeria in the world with regards to practice of faith. Nigeria is apparently described a secular, multi-cultural and multi-religious pluralistic society in words but not in action. Sadly, the north sees and wants Nigeria to be an Islamic State.

 
Interesting, around the world, most Muslim countries that have oil resources with deep and respected religious beliefs and practice are advancing and prospering beyond measure – for instance nations like Saudi Arabia, Dubai, Qatar and others are developing using 21st century technology, modern economic theories, first class management and leadership techniques, sound work ethic, and interestingly Western education to advance their nations. Why is Nigeria’s case different? Why is the so-called giant of Africa risking disintegration and on the brink of collapse? Why are we killing in the name of Allah? Why are Muslims and Christians killing each other in northern Nigeria? Can Nigeria survive as a united nation? Is Nigeria cursed because of oil and religion? Are these ominous signs of an end of Nigeria as a united nation?

 
I have written several essays and articles and presented several papers to explain the biblical root cause of this hostility between Christianity and Islam in Nigeria and especially in Africa. I’ll reproduce portions of it to remind us again, that the problem of Nigeria – in fact, the root cause of the Nigeria’s woes is simply religion, intolerance, and ignorance. Nigeria’s problem is not about poor political leadership per say or corruption or even ethnic hatred, but purely religious ignorance and intolerance.

 
Here is a portion of an essay published in May 2010. Read on!

 
Before Mohammad died in 632; he managed to unify Islam and the Arab empire into a powerful religious and political force. So for Muslims, there is no separation between religion and politics. One cannot function without the other. The introduction of Sharia in the North is a powerful and perfect example. Sadly enough, it is Christians that continue to separate religion from politics. Woe to you for your biblical and theological ignorance.

 
The irrational killings of Christians in Northern Nigeria is filled with deep-seated animosity and hatred because of the fundamental and distinctive religious, doctrinal and theological beliefs that separate the two biggest world faiths. For the purpose of this article/paper, I will deal with the resurgence of Islamic fundamentalism, which calls for the sixth pillar of Islam faith – Jihad.

 
Please let’s understand that no world religions today – Animism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Marxism, New Age Movement, Secularism, Shinto, and Taoism, etc are in such horrifying conflict except unfortunately Islam, Judaism and Christianity. Christianity is an offshoot of Judaism just like Islam is. In fact Christianity and Islam are brothers. Christians claimed to have descended from Abraham through the line of Isaac, Jacob, and Jesus. Muslims, in fact, its founder Mohammad claimed his descendant from Abraham through Ishmael. Isaac and Ishmael were two sons of Abraham, Isaac being the son of promise and Ishmael, the son of Haggai, the Egyptian slave who served in the household of Abraham, Sarah’s maiden. Realistically, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are family members. Christianity is the spiritual son of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Muslims are also the spiritual sons of Abraham and Ishmael.

 
But the question is why they are in such hostility today. Why are there deep-seated rivalries, animosity and hatred between Muslims and Christians? There are biblical, historical, theological and religious reasons for this hostility. But for the purpose of this article, Let us review the sixth pillar of Islam faith to find out the reason for this ferocious orgy to kill Christians.

 
In Islam faith, there are 6 pillars of namely:

 
1. Shahadah – the creed of witness
2. Salat – the creed of rigid and ritual prayer life
3. Zakat –the creed of almsgiving
4. Saum – the creed of fasting
5. Hajj – pilgrimage to Mecca, and
6. Jihad – Holy War to kill infidels

 
Jihad or Holy War is the sixth and most important religious duty for any serious Muslim. The Kharjites, a powerful sect of Islam raised Jihad to a sixth pillar of Islam in the early days of Islam. Muhammad himself declared it is the duty of every Muslim to subjugate the whole world to Allah, if need be by holy war. When the situation warrants, men are required to go to war in order to spread Islam or defend it against infidels. One who dies in a Jihad is guaranteed eternal life in Paradise. All male, free and adult Muslims must become involved in Jihad if they want to go to heaven. Jihad is a holy war against those who are non-Muslims, those who do not believe that Allah is the only God and who do not believe that Mohammad is a true prophet of God. Jihad is regarded as a divine institution, and it is used to advance Islam and repel evil from Muslims. Muslims who die fighting in a holy war are assured of a place in paradise and special privileges there.

 
The Islamic faith is deeply rooted in violence and Jihad in the name of Allah. The call for Jihad has always been used to conquer people, land, territories and nations. The radical Muslims who perpetrate terror, behead, kill, participate in suicide bombing, or kidnappings etc always justify their actions from Koran, the holy book of Islam. Mohammad, the founder of Islam claimed he received “revelation” from Angel Gabriel, while meditating in a cave in Medina. Many Islamic and Arabic Christian scholars question the validity of his revelations and off-course his writings. There seems to be many fables and borrowings from biblical texts of Jewish and Christian faiths.

 
Let me stay on the Jihad because how Islam began, its founder, its spread and conquest by sword, conquest of Africa, its doctrines, beliefs and its holy book, Koran are not the purpose of this piece.

 
Why do Muslims hate and kill their Christian brothers? Why do they also kill their own Muslims brothers when they renounce Islam?

 
The answers to these questions are found in the pages of Koran. Dr. Anis A. Shorrosh, a Palestine Arab Christian scholar and eminent professor Emeritus of world religions at my alma mater, in his masterpiece book, “Islam Revealed” brilliantly and eloquently explained the driving force behind the root causes of Islamic fundamentalism and fanaticism. He argued that one couldn’t understand the tensions, attacks, and violence and continuing explosion of Islamic fundamentalism until one understands the contradictions and intricacies that form the basis for Muslims' beliefs. In fact the Koran itself gives many passages that advocate, promote and justify violence and killing of infidels – anyone who is non-Muslim, who does not believe that Allah is one true god and who does not recognize Mohammad as prophet. Examples of such are found all over Koran. In Koran, 9:5 teaches, “Kill those who join other gods with Allah wherever you shall find them; seize them, besiege them, and lay wait for them with every kind of ambush: but if they shall convert, and observe prayer, and pay the obligatory alms, then let them go their way.” Other passages that call for killing infidels are: 2:92; 2:245; 2:276; 3:27; 4:102; 4:143; 5:56; 8:40; 9:29; 9:74; 9:111; 9:123; 22:39.



 
The Koran also teaches, “And if you shall be slain or die on the path of Allah, then pardon from Allah and mercy is better than all your amassing; for if you die or be slain, verily unto Allah shall you be gathered. “And they also who have fled their country and quitted their homes and suffered in my cause, and have fought and fallen, I will blot out their sins from them, and I will bring them into garden beneath which the streams do flow ((3:151-52; 3:194). Koran further states, “Fight the infidel and you will go to heaven. Turn way, and you will go to hell. In all of Islamic theology, this is the only way a person can know for sure that heaven is his destiny: wage a holy war and give up your own life.”(8:12-18)

 
I have read and heard some modern, moderate and conservative Muslims teach that Islam is a peaceful religion and that Koran is opposed to violence. I know there are many sects much like Christianity, but Christians are not going around, at least not today killing other people who disagree with them. It is true that students of history especially biblical historians cannot forget the Crusades – Roman Catholicism bloody warfare against Islam or Islam against Hinduism, the Catholics against Protestant, Lutherans, the Irish Catholics, or even the Holocaust, etc, which were all religious and political motivated warfare. The truth of the matter is that human history has been dominated with wars - religious, political, economic, social, ideology, race, classicism, sexism, etc. All kinds of warfare have been waged throughout human history. But none of these had been divisive and destructive than religious wars. Fortunately, today, humanity has made progress and such wars have been minimized and replaced with tolerance, freedom, peace, progress, scientific and technological advancement, etc except only Islam that continues to wage blatant warfare against Christianity.

 
Today, Islam is the main persecutor of Christians all over the world. Thousand of Christians are dying under Islamic persecution, especially in the Middle East, Africa and Asia. In the continent of Africa, religious violence and ethnic cleansing are enormous. Africa and Middle East have been called a "Bloody Continent." Africa is a battleground between Islam, Christianity and traditional religions. Muslims and Christians kill each other in Nigeria, Sudan, Somalia, Rwanda and Burundi. Religious and ethnic killings have decimated nations like Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Somali, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Liberia, etc. Muslims with the help of repressive government have decimated their Christian population in Senegal, Rwanda, Sudan and Algeria in order to make their nation a 100% Islamic state. Islamic fundamentalists kill and execute hundreds of women every year for unveiling their face or any sensitive body publicly. Women who commit adultery are stoned to death while Muslim men marry as many wives as they want or can afford. This is purely insanity.

 
For fanatical Muslims, it is pure joy to kill and be killed for Allah. Radical Muslims believe that they have a mandate from Allah to wage jihad against Israel, America and anyone who oppose Muslims. They believe what they are doing is for a righteous cause. Moreover, if they believe that by doing this evil they are serving Allah, nothing will dissuade them from doing it.

 
Today, Muslim fanatical sects are recruiting and training young people in Africa, including camps in Nigeria to carry out Jihad on the West. Currently, there are Muslim sects like Maitatsine, Boko-Haram, Kala-Kato sects, and now Hausa/Fulani herdsmen located in Jos, Kano, Maiduguri, Kaduna, Sokoto, Bauchi and other major Northern regions training and educating the young people to hate America, Israel and kill anyone who is non-Muslim, who oppose Islam, Muhammad and Allah. Last Christmas, Nigerians were shocked to read that one of her citizens, Umar Farouk Abdul Mutallab attempted to detonate some explosive powder in a way of terrorist attacks on US Northwest Flight 253 from Amsterdam-Schipol airport heading to Detroit, Michigan.

 
Religious conflict is a huge leadership challenge and a major threat to the security, unity and national progress of Nigeria. Religious ignorance and intolerance breed violence. Religious violence and war have decimated more lives in Nigeria in the last 40 years than hunger, disease, and accidents combined together. Northern Nigeria especially has been a battleground between Islam and Christianity. Since 1960, Nigeria has had some many incidents of religious extremism and Islamic fundamentalism in its attempt to Islamize the nation.

 
Islamic fundamentalism, fanaticism, terrorism and jihads are a big threat and enormous challenge for our nations’ leaders. I call upon Nigerian government, political leaders, religious and civil leaders, Imams, clerics, Islamic scholars, moderate, modern and conservatives Muslims and business leaders, to work together in resolving the imminent threat to Nigeria’s unity. Nigerian religious leaders must work together to ensure that Christians, Moslems and paganisms become partners in this 21st century rather than enemies in solving the social, economic and political obstacles facing our nation. They must work together to hold our politicians and government leaders accountable to the promises and principles of fairness, justice and equity.

 
They must be involved in shaping public policies, laws and decisions that hinder Nigerian people from fulfilling their God-given purposes on planet earth. Our religious leaders must work together to educate their followers about tolerance and peaceful cohabitation? As human beings we cannot accomplish much in isolation rather we develop, mature as people and achieve greatness in the context of love, relationship and fellowship. And until we learn the cardinal principle of Islam and Christianity, which is forgivingness and reconciliation, we will never live in peace. Without genuine forgiveness and reconciliation, there cannot be unity and peace. Without love, another cardinal truth of Christianity and Islam, we cannot have genuine relationship. Relationship is the most vital aspect of life. Genuine relationship and love are the greatest human assets and the essence of every major faith in the world. Christians and Muslims must understand that they are brothers from the same great grand father – Abraham.

 
Let’s surrender to the true heir and heritage of Abraham – if not let us divide peacefully and go our separate ways. This co-habitation, amalgamation or unity of Nigeria does not make sense anymore. It’s time to have serious dialogue and path forward for Nigeria and Nigerians. Enough is enough!

 
Rev. Dr. C. Kingston Ekeke reports.

 
Rev. Dr. C. Kingston Ekeke is a public theologian, author, and leadership scholar. He is the president of Leadership Wisdom Institute.

 
Note: The second portion of this article was taken from my new book in the making entitled: “The Problem with Nigeria.”

 
*Photo CaptionAn assault rifle. *One of the tools of evil in Nigeria and around the world.

-Masterweb Reports
 

It might surprise some watchers of Anambra State politics to begin to read about Governor Peter Obi’s monument; and for the less endowed in the white man’s language, particularly those of them resident in Anambra State, passion might run wild in defense of the Governor’s current mandate. While the first group might merely be confounded by the speed of time, the second just would not see their Governor and his Government as issues that are at the threshold of history – at the verge of being permanently reported in the past. Why talk of a monument whose making is unfolding still? There is yet a third interest-class; cynics who would bite, claw and shout in efforts to attain their sworn conclusions to emasculate the novel patterns adorning the political space of Anambra State. ‘What monument?’, they would ask. But in all of these dispositions, the reality of passing time and its compelling dictates in sifting the bedrock of history prevails.

 
Before the end of March, 2014, Governor Peter Obi would have served Anambra State the maximum statutorily allowable period of eight years, representing two terms of four years each. This is an uncommon privilege unprecedented in the State where the political landscape is replete with ‘men and women of timber and calibre’, who in deference to their high sounding (many a time bizarre) aliases, very often jump into a fray merely for the satisfaction of drawing blood. Even in fights they could neither sustain nor win.

 
Having taken a token look at the peculiarities of Mr. Obi’s Anambra, one begins to appreciate better the value of the Governor’s resilience, doggedness, ruggedness too. How else would one explain Mr. Obi’s stubborn resistance of the monster that President Obasanjo’s the People’s Democratic Party (PDP) foisted on and sought to perpetuate in Anambra State? Indeed, the PDP nausea, exemplified by the stolen mandate, seemed a blessing for Ndigbo as it exposed the post war conspiracy of clannish pretenders who not only sought to subdue Ndigbo physically but to kill their spirit. Even ‘in the very before’ of the totem of Igbo consciousness (apologies to Chika Okpala, Chief Zebrudaya Okoroigwe Nwogbo Alias 4.30) the people’s mandate was stolen by impostors to the people’s cause.

 
What would have been left of Ndigbo if Mr. Obi failed to lead the battle for the rescue of the heartland of the Igbo nation? The Governor’s clear headedness, his sublime understanding of the character of the deprivation and his utmost commitment to resistance, made the unyielding Ikemba of blessed memory to declare uncommon support for a young man whom he identified as fighting hegemony against an endangered nation. Mr. Obi stood, fought and conquered the marauding bunch whose resolve was a systematic emasculation of Ndigbo, using Anambra State as a pilot scheme. This early struggle signaled the relevance of Mr. Obi among Ndigbo; added to this is his seminal managing of human and material resources both in governance of Anambra State and in other spheres of leadership wherever duty calls.

 
Having served Anambra State for over six of an eight years stretch, and judging from the transparent structure of his government, Governor Obi’s scorecard could be reviewed with reasonable degree of accuracy. The indices for measuring success or failure are located in the responsibilities of government and to what extent government fulfills or neglects such duties.

 
Anambra State is one of the States in Nigeria that hardly go without press reportage. Its prominence derives from its huge pull of human resources and the inputs of Ndi-Anambra, dead or living, in the making and sustenance of the country. But for a greater part of Anambra’s 21 years as a political entity, it recorded greater negative publicity owing to loss of direction among the crop of leaders that ran its affairs. This deviation manifested in the collapse of the system while very few individuals got so robust they could sustain parallel structures that mocked the institution of government. That was why the ‘Eselus’ for instance could boast of installing what served as government in the state between 2003 and 2006, just as the ‘Offors’ did, years earlier.

 
While the strains over the ownership of government raged, the entire gamut of the responsibilities of the state went prostrate: education was abandoned, the health sector was comatose; there was comprehensive infrastructural decay and unrest of every kind marked the sociopolitical clime of the state. It remained largely so until the unprecedented judiciary intervention that nullified the celebration of absurdities and declared Mr. Obi of the All Progressive Grand Alliance (APGA) as the authentic governor of the state in March, 2006. From the date of that epochal declaration till date, Anambra State, under Governor Obi, has persisted in its march to recover the lost years and firmly situate itself among the comity of states with both vibrant economy and civilised polity. Pointers to this growth are identifiable in the resuscitation of all the sectors of the State’s economy through the vehicle of Anambra Integrated Development Strategy (ANIDS), which ensures a comprehensive and effective design, budget and implementation of simultaneous development in all sectors of the state’s economy.

 
The health sector for instance now has some government as well as private owned hospitals and institutions accredited by relevant censor organisations. Onitsha General Hospital, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Ihiala; Anambra State School of Nursing and Midwifery, Npor; St. Joseph’s Hospital, Adazi-Nnukwu; Iyi-Enu Hospital, Ogidi and Charles Borromeo Hospital, Onitsha are representational of such interventions in the health sector. The construction and inauguration of Anambra State University Teaching Hospital, Awka, is also a phenomenal entry in the credential of Governor Obi’s government.

 
The Civil Service has its own gains from the current government of the state. Apart from workers’ increased pay package which compares favourably with what obtains in some rich states, an imposing new State Secretariat (Chief Jerome Udoji State Secretariat) which today represents the pride of Anambra State workers, stands to the credit of this administration which conceived, constructed, equipped and effectively put it to use. Today, the operations of government are run from a single pool of ministries which makes for speed and efficiency. Today, government ministries have necessary enablement like vehicles for optimal performance.

 
The education sector too has recorded enormous gains from the present State Government. Both primary, secondary and tertiary institutions in the state have variously benefited from the commitment of the government to sanitise the sector in a bid to preserving the future of the society. Over one hundred and fifty secondary schools have received brand new buses; many more schools have received computers and internet facilities, water boreholes, power generating set, sports equipment and many other items to enhance acquisition of knowledge. School buildings have been reconstructed, new buildings erected and school compounds fenced. Missionary schools forcefully acquired from the owners have been returned to their original owners with grants to facilitate the rehabilitation of dilapidated structures.

 
If today one seeks the monument of Mr. Peter Obi in Anambra, the new look Anambra State where reputable donor agencies jostle to identify with the success story of Mr. Peter Obi’s administration beckons.

 
Okechukwu Anarado reports from Adazi-Nnukwu

 
*Photo Caption - Governor Peter Obi

-Masterweb Reports
 
If I were a parochial thinker or a good politician (the Nigerian way), I would be strutting for a President of Igbo extraction come 2015. It is not as if an Igbo cannot become the President of Nigeria. No, that notion is far from the truth. In short, at this critical moment in our history as a nation, an Igbo President would have waved the magic wand. My “provincial” thinking is that the Igbos in politics in Nigeria are not positioning themselves very strategically enough to command the respect that will give them that slot in the Nigerian politics of today.

 
One big problem with the Igbos is that they are politically (at least as it is practiced in Nigeria) naïve. If the Igbos feels strongly about anything, they go for it without diplomacy and that showed up when they felt that the Nigerian Project was dwarfing the Nigerian people about forty five years ago. And when the rest of Nigerians decided otherwise, the same Igbos came back and took the struggle for a united Nigeria to an awful dimension with their die hard resolve. Today, it is only the Igbos that can be found, in large numbers, in almost all nooks and crannies of the country with massive investments in all the localities as they move along.

 
It is unmistakable to perceive that the PDP is a “military machine” that guarantees any person from any group a stint in the apex political position in the country today. When I say a “military machine”, I say it in the real sense that PDP is dominated (not by numbers though, but) by the retired armed forces personals including the retired police and to some extent the Customs officers. Unfortunately, ex President Obasanjo has ambushed the rest of his colleagues to have a domineering grip on the intimidating apparatus of PDP.

 
He used the period of his eight years reign (1999 – 2007) to perfect the plot. He started by silencing all armed forces personals and other politicians who would have become a threat to his ambition. It would be remembered that he sacked all armed forces personals who have ever held any political office when he came to power in 1999. In addition, it is suspected that, he used the period to gather substantial dossiers (and you can just be certain that they are very dirty) on all present and past political figures. So with his grip on his own EFCC and with what he knows about every person that matters politically, he has been able to throw up the joker at very decisive moments. People like Atiku Abubarkar only exist merely in the political gambit of the country today.

 
To aspire to become a president in Nigerian politics today, two things have to be in your favour. One, you have to be a member of PDP and, secondly and more importantly, you have to be an ex armed personnel or you have to have the backing of the ex armed people. In the entire Igbo land (as far as I can perceive), the Nwodos were close to having the two features but unfortunately their benefactor – the IBB faction – lost out in the equation while the war raged between IBB faction and the Obasanjo loyalists. And we all know that Gen. Obasanjo does not accept 99.9% loyalty not even when his son is involved.

 
The almost moribund APGA, in the South-East, would have been the springboard for a genuine Igbo agitation for a slot at the apex political seat in Nigeria. But even at that, the nearest date will be 2019 in view of the fact that it is almost a ritual that every president must serve two terms and there is nothing that signifies that incumbent President Goodluck Jonathan will vacate that slot in 2015. Every person who is a good reader of political developments in our country would agree that the manner in which President Jonathan denied that there was no zoning arrangement within PDP denotes that he is not someone you would trust on anything. And even if he does, it is most likely that the ex army generals under the control of Obasanjo will tip Retired Col. David Mark for the job. It is pertinent to note that the inactivity of the upper legislative chamber is due to the fact that the leadership under the full grip of David Mark is not unmindful of the power flow and would not want to rock the boat.

 
Why it has become difficult for Igbos to nurture and gyrate around a strong political unit as an effective political tool is still as surprising as it is embarrassing to me. The Igbos hover around PDP and yet they do not have a reasonable relevance in it. Compare this with the South-West that has used subtle opposition to corner a large chunk of the national wealth and political relevance to itself over the years. The south-West would foster their opposition and still give the picture of being in the big party while using their Afenifere as a moderating tool to galvanize their common goal. A case at hand is how their political structure in the last April 2011 presidential election was coalesced with PDP at the national level.

 
Compare Igbo style also with the South-South that has used the natural resources, in their soil, to attract political sympathy – and not respect – to itself. The common thing among the South-South and the South-East is that they are used as a pawn in the chess board. How else would one analyze the fact that the President comes from the South-South and the biggest achievement is that a construction company built a Church for him is his Otuoke village? The only East-west road from Benin through to Oron has been under construction since 2006 and completion may not come until the President uses it again as a political campaign tool in 2015. How else also would one reconcile the fact that, all the federal highways within the South-East have never had smooth face in all the over twelve years of PDP control of power but at federal and state levels?

 
The whole of the northern block, itself, is a political machine in view of the natural tutelage of the colonial masters. But for the incessant religious insurgencies from the Islamic world that has naturally pitched them against the Western culture, the Northern Nigeria would have been politically ahead of all the regions in the country.

 
The Igbo brand of politics would have been excellent if Nigeria is operating politics based on sound ideology or manifesto. At the moment, Nigerian politicking is still based, rather, on tribal and religious nepotism more than on ethical ideology. The time when the impact of political style of Ohaneze ndi Igbo will be felt in Nigerian politics is still away ahead.

 
The Nigerian state, with the assistance of some Igbo political elite (operating consciously or unconsciously), has progressively shoved the Igbos to an unenviable corner in the scheme of things politically. After the civil war, it would seem that, there has been a very subtle and conscious stride to set the rest of the South-South against the South-East so as to whittle down their strength towards any meaningful agitation for the position of the president. One thing is being the president; another is being able to operate as a president.

 
The unwritten convention has been, let the North rule then the South. The South is the political block that amalgamates the South-West, the South-East, and the South-South into a political divide. If we agree, like some narrow-minded people think, that the amalgamation of the Northern and Southern protectorates, of 1914 in Nigeria, has been the cog in the wheel of Nigeria’s growth, politically, we could even be more comfortable to postulate that the amalgamation of the three geo-political zones in the Southern part of Nigeria is the albatross that is holding the region down, politically, as well. But I think that is all a mirage.

 
But the stack truth is that all these political arrangements based on any form of rotation amongst the “political zones” and political units in our country has, unavoidably, engendered all forms of social injustices and corruption that has thrown up one form of social malady or the other. What obtains – in that vein – is that the worst people gather together, not because of clear and sound political manifestoes but, to loot the national wealth due to lack of ingenuity in tackling political problems facing the country.

 
We also see how zoning in PDP is only applied when it pleases the controlling group in the party and not as a standard that should be followed at all times.

 
In view of all the foregoing therefore, it becomes safer to deemphasize all manner of political grouping based on any form of zoning or rotation when doing a thorough diagnosis of the real courses of underdevelopment in the Nigerian state. President Obama did not emerge as the President of the World’s number one democracy based on any form of rotation. Not even on color. He emerged based, purely, on sound rendition of how he would implement his party’s core manifesto. True democracies emphasize political institutions rather than persons, tribes, zones or rotation.

 
When solid political institutions – such as entrenchment of constitutionality and obedience to the rule of law which guarantees electorates’ supremacy, establishment of core positive social values which denounces corruption in its entirety – are erected, it will be difficult for mediocrity to creep into the polity, even under any guise. Politicians would emerge under such platform by demonstrating sufficient understanding of the rules of the game based on sound rendition of their party’s manifesto – which would have been drawn up in line with the aspirations of the citizenry – rather than by application of brutal force or intimidation.

 
I feel ashamed that a country that attained independence in 1960 is still grappling with power generation and supply in 2012 while people who have saddled social and technological development all these years still walk tall within the society. I feel ashamed that past leaders do not have the courtesy of burying their heads in shame when it is glaring that their activities have dwarfed their nation. They do not seem to understand that it is the activities of leaders (both past and present) that have turned around nations such as South Korea, Malaysia, India, Singapore, etc into modern states and has sustained modern states such as USA, Great Britain, Germany, France, etc.

 
I feel ashamed that even as things are now, our current bunch of politicians are not mindful of their activities and its net impact in our country in a couple of years to come. These people do not understand development beyond allocating a good plush of the national wealth to them with little thought on what legacy they want to bequeath our generation unborn.
 

It is on this note that I see the presidential election of 2015 as yet another opportunity for Nigerians to redeem their country. And that opportunity gets widened when the caliber of past Military Head of state of Nigeria in the person of Alhaji Buhari offers himself one more time to Nigerians to be voted as their head of the central government.
 

What has been the ploy by corrupt rulers against Buhari is that he would Islamize Nigeria. They have also flaunted the issue of the 53 brief cases during his reign with late General Idiagbon in the eighties. But all these things happened under military hegemony and none happened for conscious personal or selfish gain.
 

But beyond that, no politician has established any corruption against this man. It is on record that General Buhari did not come out of government with affluence. Not even a good home was attributed to him when he was forced out of power by iridescent General Babangida, the “evil genius”. Today, General Babangida has also lost grip of the PDP to General Obasanjo. But maybe for the fear of reprisal from Buhari, he has chosen to be insulted in PDP than unite forces with Buhari to redeem Nigeria.
 

The worst I suspect will happen if Buhari comes to power will be direct confrontation with all corrupt rulers, past or present. He will go as far as recovering their loots both at home and abroad and he may even back bills that will sentence them to over hundreds of years of imprisonment and if all these would be done in compliance with the rule of law and in the interest of our country so let it be.
 

But this is where I expect true sacrifice from our past rulers if they have blood flowing through their veins. If their activities have led a great nation such as our country Nigeria into the precarious state she finds herself in even in view of all the natural and human resources abundant in our land, could they not give themselves up to be sacrificed if only that will engender a truly powerful country where our generations unborn will worship them as martyrs?
 

When I look back 20 years ago, I begin to wonder how we actually lived without substantial communication. There was this joke about a guy who was deployed for his one year ( NYSC) post university service in one remote area in the North-East part of the country. There was no GSM network in that place at the time. After the first two months into his service, he decided to communicate his parents back home about his experiences as a “corper”. For absence of any other means, he wrote a letter. The letter got to his home town one week after he returned from the one year service.
In the same vein, I am certainly sure, our generation unborn will marvel at how we survived with the daunting corruption and poor quality of ruler-ship we are immersed in at this moment.
 

Because of long exposure to military hegemony in Nigerian, most of us grew up to think that use of force and lawlessness is the only way towards resolving social issues. The psyche that the army bequeathed us democracy still runs fresh in our system. And it is evident that the armies of African states have not completely relinquished the warped notion that part of their constitutional roles is to interfere in social crises within the state. And because they have directly or indirectly influenced who becomes a president, most presidents still think that control of the army is more important than submission to the desires of the electorate. This is why our rulers resort to using armed forces instead of civil means to bring down common demonstration such as we witnessed during the fuel subsidy turmoil at the beginning of 2012 and the Odi saga in Bayelsa state during Obasanjo’s regime.

 
So in view of the foregoing my take is that every effort should be channeled on how to extricate Nigeria from the claw of PDP at the national level. What, in my opinion, should be done to actualize this is for all genuine progressives from all over the country to come out in unity in the war to liberate Nigeria from the strangle hold of PDP first, then thereafter institute a realistic electoral reform that will put the power of determination of who leads Nigeria in the hands of the electorate. If Buhari an Hausa Fulani (and an ex soldier) or any Igbo man or any Yoruba man or any Ijaw man or indeed any other Nigerian (without PDP mindset) can be used as the molecule that would attract followership that will have that capacity to withstand PDP’s crushing momentum, let all Nigerians shield their tribal or religious bigotry and follow that person.

 
So until we obliterate the military mentality from our psyche as a people, Nigeria and Nigerians will not know development and progress. And PDP, as it is constituted today, remains a very viable psychological component to that mind set. So when I say that Igbos do not have a chance, what runs at the back of my mind is that even if an Igbo becomes the president of Nigeria within PDP (against all perceivable odds), Nigeria’s predicament would not have still gotten a true solution.

 
Chris Onyishi (ctekchris@yahoo.com)reports from Lagos, Nigeria.

 
*Photo Caption - Seal of The President of The Federal Republic of Nigeria. It is the official symbol of the Nigerian President, first used in 1979 by President Shehu Shagari.

-Masterweb Reports
 
It was my first time in Europe, London to be precise, and I had gone to check this apartment that was advertised in the Loot weekly. At that time I was still living with a relation, and I was quite happy that the advertised apartment was no more than 100m from where I was staying. So, I walked up to the indicated address, rang the doorbell and waited for a response. After a few seconds the door opened and a male Caucasian appeared. I'm never going to forget the look on his face after he discovered that an African had come to rent the room. He didn't beat about the bush in informing the room had been taken the next day I had called as agreed. Well I had expected something like this from my encounter with him the previous day.

 
I never quite realised I was Black until that particular evening. Being a first experience I wasn't sure whether to be angry, sad, indifferent or simply laugh it off. I could have gone ahead to brand the whole White race as racists, but then I would have to account for the countless kindness and friendship I had met in many Caucasians that I have come across. A similar incident occurred about two years ago in Germany, when I had gone to (again) look up an apartment for rent. I had this time gone with my colleague and friend, an Indian, and the German owner bluntly stated she could not rent the apartment to foreigners.

 
I live in Europe, and issues like these boardering on racism are not far-fetched. And expectedly, I had received calls from friends in Nigeria wanting to know how I had coped with such. And in my quiet moments of reflection I have found it outrightly dishonest to put forth life within the Nigerian boarders as devoid of similar attitudes from fellow Nigerians. That is, being Nigerian and living within Nigeria is likely to expose you to similar treatment from other human beings who generally consider you as less deserving of certain considerations for no other reason than you belong to a different tribe. Or a different religion. I considered our national politics, where the Northerners famously claimed power belonged to them. Or should one now consider the Igbos and the Yorubas who, among others, would in many cases not give out their children to marry members of the other tribes?

 
This might appear trivial, but then it's in context: during my undergraduate education at Ife an Igbo boy had blantantly refused to sell an extra bedspace of his to a non-Igbo student. A Yoruba person close to me had also jokingly raised an objection to my having an Igbo female friend.

 
How about cases where only individuals from particular families are allowed to monopolise certain political offices?

 
We find the same pattern in corporate bodies, in sport, in education, in health,... in fact, in the entire social structure we've come to know as Nigeria. What right do I have then to blame a Caucasian, an Indian, or a Chinese for discriminating against me for being African? And historically speaking, what right do we have as a nation for speaking and standing against apartheid of South Africa? In my opinion I think we've spent so long discriminating against fellow Nigerians on the basis of tribe and religion that this pervertion has come to be viewed as normal in the Nigerian context. The picture becomes more deplorable when we consider that this tribalistic tendencies are daily being fuelled by the parents, and other respected members of our societies. How many Nigerians can confidently say their parents and persons close to them have never made malicious comments about members of the other tribes? And when they do this, do we not join in in laughing against the Hausas, Yorubas,and Igbos, as the case maybe?

 
Our entire culture and subcultures have been founded on this tribal divisioning, how hyprocritical of us to stand against neo-apartheid in different countries around the world. Hardly would an unfortunate incident affecting most of the tribes in the country occur in some parts of the country and certain tribes not cry out that it's nothing short of a conspiratorial cleansing of their tribe. I allude to Boko Haram's murderous campaign that has seen countless Yorubas, Hausas, Igbos and other tribes and aliens slain, and yet some tribe fuelled by a tribal paranoia keep alleging it's an attempt by Nigeria to expunge them. This in their case is a a peculiar manifestation of the same tribalistic outlook.

 
I have been to different parts of Nigeria, and also to several countries around the world, and everywhere I have noticed that human beings are essentially the same, with both kind aspects and at the same time with a predisposition to maltreating other races and tribes of men. On a lighter side now, an Italian-American had once asked me in Philadelphia if there were actual houses in Nigeria. I suppose she thought we were living on some trees or inside some caves. Such stereotypical view as this, is usually not an evidence of a defect in the victim of such view, but on the other hand it is nothing short of a demonstration her shocking and shameful ignorance. And yes, that was just two years ago, not two centuries ago.

 
I have heard Yorubas who have never been to Northern Nigeria tell me things about the Hausas. The Igbos do the same, the same thing the Hausas. The sad thing is that such stereotypical and entirely ignorant branding of other tribes is not aways caused by illiteracy. When I was a kid I had been made to believe that education should liberate a people, in our case it seems to drive us further down the path of bondage.

 
Let's for a minute consider how it has affected every splinter of our national experience. Do you need me to write about the politics of blood and greed, where each tribe sees the privilege to serve the nation as no more than a golden opportunity to divert the nation's bleeding wealth to his own part of the country? And as a result of the competitive scramble for loot, no one cares that the nation remains stagnant, once the misguided politician is from your tribe. How many politicians do we have that can claim exemption to this? It has become a status behaviour for them to establish a university, a hospital , or any other such structures in their own states and villages once elected. And we all look away from the fact that such institutions could have better served Nigerians in some other parts of the country.

 
What of sport? Some weeks ago the whole world gathered in London to watch the open shame of Nigeria, the self-acclaimed giant of African (too sad being merely numerous isn't enough to merit such description). I am sure not many Nigerians were disappointed or shocked by the outcome, that we didn't leave London with a tiny medal. Had they included copper, or wood in the awarded medals I am not so sure we would have come home with enough wood to light our frozen national heart. One would then ask, how come such a country with so many people could not lift a single medal? Well, we are from a country where the last time we heard of merit spoken of was in the fairy tales told by our parents, in turn told them by their own parents. Instead, in the name of being faithful to some spurious Federal character, we ended up enlisting athletes who were below average. Should it really matter which tribe the athletes come from as long as they are the best the country could find? If for instance we have 15 slots to fill on a football team, and out of all the interviewd candidates 12 Igbos (or Hausas or Yorubas) possess performance superior to every other person, one should think it makes more sense to choose those ones rather than to push in members of the other tribes who have no competing chance, not even within our own country.

 
The educational sector and the principle, for instance, of catchment area scores. I wish I could laugh at this policy's silliness, but that it's a very sad phenomenon. That smarter candidates are turned away from an institution just because they are from different states: Then we go ahead and lower the pass mark for the indigenes of our own states. The sad thing is, that poor boy from another state who probably gave his best to writing the exam, is turned away empty-handed. And if such individual has no such institution in his own state, he though being a Nigerian becomes an education-destitute in his own country. But then you'd ask, shouldn't the state be able to actively enhance the education of its indigenes? By all means, it must. But then should it be by lowering the standard and thus prematuredly aborting the surviving notion of merit? Certainly not. Lowering the pass mark (catchment score it is called) for the state is analogous to Britain deciding its own sprinters would only need to run half track to qualify for a medal. But instead of adopting the Nigerian model, it spent billions of pounds in training its citizens so they had more chance of qualifying without having to selectively beat down the pass mark for the Britons. Any serious state interested in enhancing its indigenes education should be read invest in infrastructure acquisition and students' training especially at the the primary and secondary school levels. If a state invests in hiring exceptional teachers and in equipping the education at these indicated levels, it can then be expected that its indigines will have no problem meeting a unified entry qualification into the higher institutions. In addition, the state can also (and should) give worthy scholarships to exceptional and hardworking indigenous students, which should directly stimulate and motivate their interest in knowledge education. To round this paragraph off, I must say University of llorin is about the worst in terms of ambushing university education (a Federal university at that) for its own indigenes. Perhaps there are other universities like this within the country, and one only needs to interview more students to find this out.

 
Racism, tribalism, nepotism and all the other forms of negative human relational isms are a disease inhabiting the dirty crevices of the human soul. They are often symptomised by absurd stereotypes, fuelled by ignorance and thriving in the mind of the mentally, morally and spiritually stunted regardless of whether such predisposition is found in an illiterate person or an Emeritus professor. As Nigerians we need not look too far afield for a demonstration of its unfortunate effects, it's right here in our homes, in religious and educational institutions, and in governance. And until we shed this contemptible cloak of immaturity, we are going no where as a country.

 
Jide Olubiyi, Research Center Julich, Germany.

 
*Photo Caption -  Map and Flag of Nigeria

-Masterweb Reports
 
The quest for the Igbo race to be politically, economically and spiritually emancipated from all the conspiracies and betrayals bedeviling their existence since after the Biafra Genocide led to the formation of General Assembly of all Igbo Christian Organisations and Ministers (GAAICOM). This divine mandate was corroborated and adopted on the 4th of April 2002 by clergy men cutting across all denominations at the Nnamdi Azikiwe Stadium Enugu. GAAICOM comprising clergymen, church workers and leaders cutting across all denominations have been working since 2002 behind the scene towards idolatrous, cultural, social, political and economic emancipation of Igbos.

 
Presently in Nigeria, Igbos are allowed to fend for themselves. All the estates, businesses and industries that litter Igbo land are mostly due to individual efforts. The Nigerian state finds it expedient to use the intelligence and ingenuity of the Igbo but deny them the much needed federal presence. The activities of Igbo saboteurs who prefer the crumbs from the masters table are another source of self marginalization. The timidity and slavery mentality of Igbo Public Servants when opportune to attract federal projects and attention to Igbo land is another source of concern.

 
During the build – up to the 2011 presidential elections, GAAICOM decided to throw weight behind the candidacy of a South – South candidate in the person of Goodluck Jonathan with the understanding that after his tenure in 2015, the Igbos will be given the slot. In addition, GAAICOM requested, in a written document, that the constant killings of Igbos be terminated in the North. GAAICOM also demanded that the 2nd Niger Bridge, Onitsha seaport, Enugu – Onitsha Expressway, Enugu – port –Harcourt Expressway, and Enugu – Abakaliki Road be repaired to open up the region for commercial activities. The demand included an international airport in the South East, non – interference in electoral processes in the South East so that Igbos can hold their leaders accountable. The agents of the president agreed to all these and were on the verge of signing a written agreement as a reference point when the idea of involving Ohanaeze was mooted.

 
In order to avoid the treachery associated with Nigerian political climate, GAAICOM took the documented requests to Ohaneze leadership under Ambassador Ralph Uwechue, who expressed his handicap on the premise that his tenure remained only three months, expiring in July 2010. GAAICOM decided to lobby and pressurize Ohanaeze Chieftains to grant the present leadership tenure extension to enable them complete the assignment of repositioning the Igbos for posterity. The Ohaneze Chieftains grudgingly yielded to the demands of GAAICOM.

 
Today it is obvious that the South East is yet to benefit much from this administration. Apart from the military high command under an Igbo man, the rest of the agreement is yet to be given attention. Book Haram Jihadists are killing Igbos all over Northern Nigeria and security agencies have not contained the situation. Igbos are out in the cold, wandering like sheep without shepherd.

 
Igbos cannot rely on the magnanimity of the North, West and South South before taking their rightful place. The progressive element in the North and South - West are creating formidable alliance for 2015. The South South is gearing for a second term; the Middle Belt is agitating for another chance while the Northern Oligarchy is positioning their candidate in the event of President Jonathan being pressurized out of the race using Boko Haram. Where is the place of Ndigbo in all these schemes and maneuvers?

 
Therefore, the leadership of the GAAICOM took far reaching decisions at the 2-day pre-convention meeting which held at the Ohaneze Ndigbo National Headquarters on the 12th and 13th of July, 2015 aimed at repositioning the Igbos politically, socially and economically. These decisions will be ratified by the Patriach Ecclesia Council meeting scheduled for the 15th of September, 2012. Therefore, all Igbo sons and daughters should stand behind this divinely mandated move under the leadership of Apostle Dr. P.C.J. Macjossy, Bishop Emmanuel Chukwuma, Rev.Fr Alphonsus Okoh ,Archbishop Austin Nwodika , Rev Obinna Akukwe , Bishop Obi Onubogu among others to ensure that Igbos spiritually strategize for total emancipation through the proposed "3 Day Walk into the Presence of God" or risk monumental consignment into the political dustbin of Nigeria.
 
All state coordinators should inform their chapters accordingly ahead of the Patriach Ecclesia Meeting.

 
Obinna Akukwe
Director of Media and Communication, GAAICOM
Contact:gaaicommedia@yahoo.com

 
*Photo Caption -  Map of Igboland